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Chris Preuss_State of Confusion

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Chris Preuss_State of Confusion

  1. 1. Innovation’s Disruption of Everything
  2. 2. Four Ideas to Ponder  Pretext - Societal Confusion  Consumer Confusion  Organizational Confusion  Future Confusion
  3. 3. The New Reality “We no longer feel ourselves to be guests in someone else’s home and therefore obliged to make our behavior conform with a set of pre-existing cosmic rules. It is our creation now. We make the rules. We establish the parameters of reality. We create the world, and because we do, we no longer feel beholden to outside forces. We no longer have to justify our behavior, for we are now the architects of the universe. We are responsible to nothing outside ourselves, for we are the kingdom, the power, and the glory for ever and ever.” Jeremy Rifkin, Algeny, p. 244 (Viking Press, New York), 1983.
  4. 4. Pretext – Societal Confusion  Technology and Innovation are merely the enablers to a broader human experience…but human nature remains the same  The implication is that innovation and technology have accelerated and in some cases exaggerated both perception and reality…  This can be for the worse or the better – or we can take a poll!
  5. 5. Perceptions Changed by Reality
  6. 6. Reality vs. Perception
  7. 7. Pretext – Societal Confusion Implications:  Major societal trends that took decades to advance may now advance in months  The moral shifts this can and will create present major dilemmas to markets and society  Thought: How do you market truth claims when the definition of what is true can change before your eyes?
  8. 8. Technology and Innovation are merely the enablers to a broader human experience…but human nature remains the same
  9. 9. Consumer Confusion  Demographic presuppositions often WRONG!  Millennials rule?  Boomer’s irrelevant?
  10. 10. Wrong! Truth?: Millennials don’t like cars: “There's a lot of evidence that millennials don't drive as much — or care as much for cars in general — as previous generations their own age did. They're less likely to get driver's licenses. They tend to take fewer car trips, and when they do, those trips are shorter. They're also more likely than older generations to get around by alternative means: by foot, by bike, or by transit.” Washington Post, October 14, 2014 Myth: Millennials don't like cars and don't find them essential. Truth: Young people not only like cars but are passionate about them.  70 percent of Millennials enjoy driving versus 58 percent of Boomers and 66 percent of Gen Xers  3 in 4 young people agree "they couldn't live without their current car" versus 62 percent of Boomers and on par with Gen Xers (73 percent)  6 in 10 Millennials said "they feel like losers among their peers without their cars“ MTV/Viacom Drive Study, January 2015
  11. 11. Wrong!
  12. 12. Consumer Confusion  Demographic presuppositions often WRONG!  But the media flow like lemmings!  Technology adoption is rarely contained to a demographic group – but how technology is used varies  Apple proved that UI and Design trumps everything
  13. 13. Consumer Confusion  Demographic presuppositions often WRONG!  But the media flow like lemmings!  Technology adoption and penetration is vast – how technology is used is what’s different  Apple proved that UI and Design trumps everything every time  Whenever you hear “the death of …”
  14. 14. Buy! SIRI
  15. 15. Organizational Confusion  Human Nature and protecting my turf  Agency confusion  Revenge of the Nerds
  16. 16. Future Confusion  Expect the unexpected  Don’t buy into the going narrative  The more things change….
  17. 17. About all this….  “Often wrong, but never in doubt!” Bob Lutz

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