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Buying motives

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Buying motives

  1. 1. THE INDIAN HIGH SCHOOL, DUBAI MARKETING PROJECT BUYING MOTIVES Date: 12th October 2014 TEACHER: MRS.RENNET.JAMES NAME:VRIDDHI.SHARMA GRADE 11 COM-D
  2. 2. THE INDIAN HIGH SCHOOL,DUBAI BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE Certified that this assignment ‘’Buying Motives’’ is the bonafide work of ‘’Vriddhi.Sharma’’ who carried out the assignment under my supervision. Signature Date: 12th October 2014
  3. 3. THE INDIAN HIGH SCHOOL, DUBAI ACKNOWLEDGEMENT CERTIFICATE In order to accomplish this assignment, I would like to thank my marketing teacher, Mrs.Rennet.James for guiding me throughout the assignment. I’m grateful to them for giving this opportunity. It was fun and informative doing this. I would like to thank all of them who helped me in doing this project and who helped me in bringing this assignment a successful one. Thank you
  4. 4. METHODOLOGY The methodology used in this product is personal collection of data. I conducted a personal interview with all the customers of the product line cold drinks. Ten questions were asked to each person and each question was straightforward. All the questions were aligned in an orderly manner. The wording was easy to understand. All the questions in the survey are structured questions. Personal method of interviewing people is thus, the most reliable but an expensive and time consuming form of conducting a survey.
  5. 5. TABLE OF CONTENT 1. BUYING MOTIVES MEANING AND DEFINITION. TYPES. STAGES. REASONS FOR BUYING. HOW CONSUMERS BUY? WHY CONSUMERS BUY? 2. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR MEANING AND DEFINITION 3 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS FACTORS TYPES OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 3. BLACK BOX MODEL 4. PRODUCT TYPE: SOFT DRINKS COCA COLA PEPSI SPRITE MIRINDA 5. QUESTIONNAIRE SAMPLE 6. ANALYSIS 7. CONCLUSION 8. BIBLOGRAPHY
  6. 6. BUYING MOTIVES MEANING AND DEFINITION A buying motive is the reason why the customer purchases the goods. So, motive refers to thought, urge, feeling, emotion and drive which make the buyer to react in the form of a decision. Motivation explains the behavior of why they are going to buy the goods. They buy the goods due to several motives such as economic, social, psychological, etc. For example: In winter seasons we are motivated to purchase the woolen clothes to protect from the cold. Likewise, we are motivated to purchase the fans in summer season to get relief from the hot. Knowledge of buying motives of the customers is important for the producers and suppliers. The needs and desires of customers and their buying behavior should be properly discussed. This will help to take proper step for drawing the attention and sale of goods. So, buying motive is concerned with the reasons that impulse the buyer to take the decision for the action. It motivates or induces the customers that may be affected due to several reasons such as pride, fashion, fear, safety, love, affection, comfort, convenience and economy. After analyzing and evaluating it, the producers as well as suppliers can effort to develop the product and advertisement creativity.
  7. 7. PARTICIPANTS IN BUYING MOTIVES There are the following different roles that persons can play in a buying decision: 1. Initiator: The initiator is a person who first suggests or thinks of the idea of buying the particular product. For example, publisher of a book initiates the professor to ask the students of his class to purchase the book. Here publisher is the initiator, the first person to initiate the buying process. 2. Influencer: Influencer is a person who explicitly or implicitly has some influence on the final buying decision of others. Students are influenced by the advice of the professor while taking a decision to purchase a book. Here professor is the influencer. 3. Decider: The decider is a person who ultimately determines any part or whole of the buying decision, i.e., whether to buy, what to buy, how to buy, when to buy or where to buy. Children are the deciders for buying the toys, house lady for kitchen provisions, and head of the family for durable or luxury items. 4. Buyer: The buyer is the person who actually purchase. Buyer may be the decider or he may be some other person. Children (deciders) are the deciders for purchasing the toys, but purchases are made by the parents. 5. User: User is the person who actually uses or consumes the services or products. The marketer's task is to study the buying process and its main participants and their role in the buying process. He should initiate all of them to make the purchases of his product at different stages and through different strategies.
  8. 8. TECHNIQUES OF MOTIVATIONAL RESEARCH The following techniques are mainly employed for consumer behavior research or motivation research: 1. Experience and knowledge technique: Under this technique, buyers behavior is estimated on the basis of experience and knowledge gained by the marketing executives because of their close association with the customers. Through experience, they come to know what are the main buying motives for their products and why? 2. Traditional or questionnaire technique: A questionnaire is prepared by the marketer with the help of psychologists under this technique. The questionnaires so prepared, are sent to the selected consumers for their return to the company after they are duly filled in. The completed questionnaires received by the company are analyzed and results are extracted about the buyers' motives and behavior. 3. Depth Interview Technique: It is the method of probing the unconscious mind. It is time consuming technique and requires considerable patience. Under this technique, no direct question is asked by the interviewer but the interviewer talks with the consumer in free atmosphere so that the interviewee may express their views intensively. It is possible for the skilled interviewer to go deep and uncover information buried below the conscious mind. 4. Projective technique: The projective technique provides the subject with a stimulus situation that gives him an opportunity to impose upon it his own private needs and his particular perception and interpretation.
  9. 9. STAGES OF BUYING MOTIVES Generally, the purchaser passes through five distinct stages in taking a decision for purchasing a particular commodity. These stages are: (i) need arousal, (ii) information search, (iii) evaluation behavior, (iv) purchase decision, and (v) post purchase feelings. (i) Need arousal: The buying process starts with need arousal. A need can be activated through internal or external stimuli. A need can also be aroused by an external stimulus such as sight of a new thing in a shop while purchasing other things. There is two-fold significance of need arousal stage to a marketing man. 1. First the marketer must identify the drive that might actually or potentially connect to the product class or brand and make the buyer feel that the product can satisfy the drive, he feels, and 2. It also helps recognize that the need levels for the product fluctuate over time and are triggered by different cues. The marketer can arrange cues to conform better to the natural rhythms and timing of need arousal. (ii) Information search: After need arousal, the consumer tries to solve it and gathers the sources and information about the product. Depending upon the intensity of need, it produces two states of individual. The first state is called heightened attention when the consumer becomes more receptive to the information regarding the item he needs. If a consumer needs to purchase a television, he will pay mere attention to TV ads and the remarks made by friends and associates about TVs. If need is more intense, the individual enters a state of active information search and he tries to collect more information about the product, its key attributes, qualities of various brands and about the outlets where they are available. There are four consumer information sources. (i) Personal sources (family, friends, neighbors etc.) (ii) Commercial sources (advertisements, salesmen, dealers). (iii) Public sources (mass media, consumer-rating organizations). (iv) Experiential sources (handling, examining, using the product). Identifying the information sources and their respective roles and importance calls for interviewing consumers about the sources of information and can use the findings to plan its advertisements. (iii) Evaluation behavior: Having collected the information, the consumer clarify and evaluate the alternatives. There is, unfortunately no simple and single evaluation process used by all consumers or even by one consumer in all buying situations. The most current process of evaluation is to judge the product largely on a conscious and rational basis. Various considerations form the part of judgment such as product attributes, importance, weights,
  10. 10. brand image, utility function for each attribute, and attitude etc. After evaluation of various alternatives, he takes the decision to buy. (iv) Purchase decision: Evaluation behavior leads the consumer to form a ranked set of preferences. Normally a consumer buys the article, he or she likes most but there are three more important consideration for taking the buying decision: (a) attitude of other such as of wife, relatives, and friends, (b) anticipated situational factors as expected family income, expected total cost of the product and the expected benefits of the product; (c) unanticipated situational factors as looks or manner of the salesman or the way business is carried on. The marketer must consider these factors and should try to provoke the feeling of risk in the consumer and attempt to provide information and support that will help him. (v) Post purchase feelings: After buying and trying the product, the consumer will feel some level of satisfaction or dissatisfaction and level of satisfaction depends very much on the expectation and the product's perceived performance. If the product matches up to his expectations, the consumer is satisfied; if it exceeds, he is highly satisfied; and if it falls short of expectations, he is dissatisfied.
  11. 11. TYPES OF BUYING MOTIVES Buying motive is the urge or motive to satisfy a desire or need that makes people buy goods or services. Behind every purchase there is a buying motive.It refers to the thoughts, feelings, emotions and instincts, which arouse in the buyers a desire to buy an article. A buyer does not buy because s/he has been persuaded by the salesman, but s/he buys for the aroused desire in him or her. Motives should be distinguished from instincts. A motive is simply a reason for carrying out a particular behavior and not an automatic response to a stimulus, whereas instincts are pre-programmed responses, which are inborn in the individual and involuntary. Thus hunger is an instinct whereas desire to purchase pizza is a buying motive. According to Prof. D. J. Duncan, “Buying Motives are those influences or considerations which provide the impulse to buy, induce action and determine choice in the purchase of goods and services.” Buying motives are can be divided by the following way:
  12. 12. Product Buying Motives: Product buying motives refer to those influences and reasons, which prompt (i.e. induce) a buyer to choose a particular product in preference to other products. They include the physical attraction of the product (i.e. the design, shape, dimension, size, colour, package, performance, price etc. of the product) or the psychological attraction of the product (i.e. the enhancement of the social prestige or status of the purchaser through its possession), desire to remove or reduce the danger or damage to life or body of the possessor, etc. In short, they refer to all those characteristics of a product, which induce a buyer to buy it in preference to other products. Product buying motives may be sub-divided into two groups, viz., (1) emotional product buying motives and (2) rational product buying motives. A. Promotional Product Buying Motives: When a buyer decides to purchase a product without thinking over the matter logically and carefully (i.e., without much reasoning), she is said to have been influenced by emotional product buying motives. B. Rational Product Buying Motives: When a buyer decides to buy a certain thing after careful consideration (i.e. after thinking over the matter consciously and logically), s/he is said to have been influenced by rational product buying motives. Patronage Buying Motives: Patronage buying motives refer to those considerations or reasons, which prompt a buyer to buy the product wanted by him from a particular shop in preference to other shops. In other words, they are those considerations or reasons, which make a buyer, patronize a particular shop in preference to other shops while buying a product. Patronage buying motives also may be sub-divided into two groups viz. a) Emotional patronage buying motives and b) Rational patronage buying motives.
  13. 13. A. Emotional Patronage Buying Motives: When a buyer patronizes a shop (i.e. purchases the things required by him from a particular shop) without applying his mind or without reasoning, he is said to have been influenced by emotional patronage buying motives. B. Rational Patronage Buying Motives: When a buyer patronizes a shop after careful consideration (i.e. after much logical reasoning and careful thinking) he is said to have been influenced by rational patronage buying motives. Characteristics of Buying Motives: There is a process by which individual decides whether, what, when from whom, where & how much to buy. It comprises of mental and physical activities of a consumer. Individual behavior is also influenced by internal and external factors. There is drastic change in the attitude and behavior of consumer.
  14. 14. WHY DO CONSUMERS BUY ? People have six motives for buying any product or service : DESIRE FOR GAIN: Most of our prospects are going to have this as their primary motive whether they measure the financial gain directly or indirectly.if investing in advertising, as noted, then the expectations is to generate more prospects and, ultimately, profitable new customers. If buying a new truck for a fleet a motive for gain may be the increased fuel effiency of the truck to a reduced operating cost , lower maintainence cost or greater hauling capacity that allows for productivity in use. On a personal level an investment in real state, mutual funds or other forms of direct payback for personal gain or business profit can be a dominant reason as a buying motive. FEAR OF LOSS: While buying insurance is an obvious example of spending to avoid a loss, there are other examples. In business, a prospect who feels they are losing their market share or losing out on new opportunities may be motivated by fear of loss. This can lead to spending to better compete. For example, a company may open a new distribution center or increase training for customer service or staff to defend market share. COMFORT AND CONVIENCE : A few examples of personal comfort and convinience in business would be having a comfortable office chair or a reserved parking space by the front door of the office. At the organisational level, the convinience of dealing with your can be seen as having you being a responsive representative. As the prospect works with your company, though, the view can expand to include dealing with other parts of your company with whom the client interacts: delivery, billing, your assistant or any employee of the company. SECURITY AND PROTECTION: Smoke alarms or a security fence are good examples of purchasing for security. In business, keep in mind security in choosing the source of a source of a purchase is important. There is, of course, the old famous saying in technology that no purchasing agent ever got fired for choosing to buy from IBM. Because of previous experience, recommendation by others or brand reputation, your product or service needs to ideally, be established as the superior overall value for purchase. At least , as sales guru Brain Tracy notes in his training, you need to be viewed as the safest and best choice or the least risk decision. Fear of criticism by others for choosing you can be seen as an unsafe choice. In the early years of USA Today, where I worked earlier in my earlier career, the company had to battle the ‘McPaper’ tag that kept prospective advertisers from spending their market budgets with us. We
  15. 15. had to battle the perception that the content was not credible and, thus, not creating a quality readership. Even though the research validated the demographic characteristics of the readers, there was still the perception that greater editorial creditability was needed before certain clients would work with us a greater share of their budgets. It may have seemed fair from our prospective, but it was a reality to the prospect and it had to be overcome. Fortunately that view became virtually nonexistent and USA Today is now a well-established news and information source. PRIDE AND OWNERSHIP: The pride factor may be overt or subtle. I had a former boss who was compelled to tell everyone about his Mercedes, corvette and boat. He was a bit extreme but he got personal satisfaction in talking about his possessions. For others pride may be very internal through a sense of accomplishment. SATISFACTION OF EMOTION: This can be in any ways. Using the example of advertising again, you may not naturally associate advertising with satisfaction of emotion. Still, many businesses see themselves as up and comers, market leaders or innovators (ex: Apple). Advertising reinforces their market position to the broader public. Think about the premium paid by a company to be an Olympic sponsor. The total value of association cannot be measured in just dollars and cents. Advertising is also used to support the morale of staff by validating the quality of their employer. Sponsorship of a Little League team shows a commitment to community by a business.
  16. 16. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR Consumer Behavior is the study of individuals, groups, or organizations and the processes they use to select, secure, and dispose of products, services, experiences, or ideas to satisfy needs and the impacts that these processes have on the consumer and society.[1] It blends elements from psychology, sociology, social anthropology, marketing and economics. It attempts to understand the decision-making processes of buyers, both individually and in groups such as how emotions affect buying behavior. It studies characteristics of individual consumers such as demographics and behavioral variables in an attempt to understand people's wants. It also tries to assess influences on the consumer from groups such as family, friends, reference groups, and society in general. Customer behavior study is based on consumer buying behavior, with the customer playing the three distinct roles of user, payer and buyer. Research has shown that consumer behavior is difficult to predict, even for experts in the field.[2] Relationship marketing is an influential asset for customer behavior analysis as it has a keen interest in the re-discovery of the true meaning of marketing through the re-affirmation of the importance of the customer or buyer. A greater importance is also placed on consumer retention, customer relationship management, personalization, customization and one-to-one marketing. Social functions can be categorized into social choice and welfare functions.
  17. 17. The 3 Essential Questions About Consumers 1. Do they buy what their friends and family buy? 2. Have they had personal experience with the product? 3. How does society feel about the product? QUESTION #1 Do they buy what their friends and family buy? The mostly likely answer is yes. In the battle between nature and nurture, nurture is the most likely to win when it comes to consumer behavior. I know of entire families that will only buy Ford trucks, or only send their children to one College. Once a product is proven to solve the consumer’s problem, then the consumer will become an huge advocate for that product. Friends are also a huge influence on product purchases. High school “cliques” are segmented by behavior but also by image. One group of friends might wear expensive clothing while another group may only wear dark clothing. One group might only play Nintendo games while another is addicted to XBOX games. Individuals with similar tastes tend to congregate and influence each other’s spending habits and product choice. Successful products are designed to target one group at a time. QUESTION #2 Have they had personal experience with the product? This is where customer service and product quality are the most influential. If a consumer has had a bad experience with a product, that product is likely tainted for life. They will move on to a competitor. A company has one chance at a first impression, and if they get it wrong or the product doesn’t solve a problem, the product will fail. This is especially true in the service industry. If a car mechanic fails to fix a car, then consumers will not come back. If a restaurant gives everyone food poisoning for a night, those patrons will not be coming back. Make sure your product is ready, provides value, and solves a problem for its target market. QUESTION #3 How does society feel about the product? Even if a consumer’s family and friends feel okay about a product, doesn’t mean the rest of society will. A great example of this is cigarettes. Since about 1960, there has been multiple campaigns against tobacco use and its health effects. As such, there has been
  18. 18. a massive decline in smoking. Consumers can respond in 3 ways to a society-wide campaign against their product. They can either adopt the message (which most people have in regards to tobacco), or they can reject it. The rejection of a product creates a societal “taboo” that heavily influences a consumer’s decision to buy. The final response is an alteration of the original product. If tobacco is frowned upon by society as a whole, then why not try electronic cigarettes instead? The consumer can keep ingesting nicotine, without the negative impact on their self-image.
  19. 19. FACTORS INFLUENCING CONSUMER BEHAVIOR I. Cultural factors: Cultural factors are coming from the different components related to culture or cultural environment from which the consumer belongs. Sub-cultures : A society is composed of several sub-cultures in which people can identify. Subcultures are groups of people who share the same values based on a common experience or a similar lifestyle in general. Social classes: Social classes are defined as groups more or less homogenous and ranked against each other according to a form of social hierarchy. Even if it’s very large groups, we usually find similar values, lifestyles, interests and behaviors in individuals belonging to the same social class. Cultural trends: Cultural trends or “Bandwagon effect” are defined as trends widely followed by people and which are amplified by their mere popularity and by conformity or compliance with social pressure. The more people follow a trend, the more others will want to follow it. II. Social factors: Social factors are among the factors influencing consumer behavior significantly. They fall into three categories: reference groups, family and social roles and status. Reference groups and membership groups: The membership groups of an individual are social groups to which he belongs and which will influence him. The membership groups are usually related to its social origin, age, place of residence, work, hobbies, leisure, etc. The influence level may vary depending on individuals and groups. But is generally observed common consumption trends among the members of a same group.
  20. 20. Family: The family is maybe the most influencing factor for an individual. It forms an environment of socialization in which an individual will evolve, shape his personality, acquire values. But also develop attitudes and opinions on various subjects such as politics, society, social relations or himself and his desires. Social roles and status: The position of an individual within his family, his work, his country club, his group of friends, etc.. – All this can be defined in terms of role and social status. A social role is a set of attitudes and activities that an individual is supposed to have and do according to his profession and his position at work, his position in the family, his gender, etc.. – and expectations of the people around him. Social status meanwhile reflects the rank and the importance of this role in society or in social groups. Some are more valued than others. III. Personal factors: Decisions and buying behavior are obviously also influenced by the characteristics of each consumer. IV. Psychological factors: Among the factors factors influencing consumer behavior, psychological factors can be divided into 4 categories: motivation, perception, learning as well as beliefs and attitudes. Many factors influencing consumer behavior: As we have just seen, many factors, specificities and characteristics influence the individual in what he is and the consumer in his decision making process, shopping habits, purchasing behavior, the brands he buys or the retailers he goes. Purchase decision is the result of each and every one of these factors. An individual and a consumer is led by his culture, his subculture, his social class, his membership groups, his family, his personality, his psychological factors, etc.. And is influenced by cultural trends as well as his social and societal environment. By identifying and understanding the factors that influence their customers, brands have the opportunity to develop a strategy, a marketing message (Unique Value Proposition) and advertising campaigns more efficient and more in line with the needs and ways of thinking of their target consumers. A real asset to better meet the needs of its customers and increase sales.
  21. 21. TYPES OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR Impulse Purchases When a consumer stands at the checkout and notices lip moisturizer, magazines and gum, and adds one of the items to his cart of groceries, it's often referred to as an impulse purchase. The consumer makes a purchase with little to no thought or planning involved. In most instances this happens with low-priced items. Routine Purchases There are items consumers are used to purchasing every day, once a week or monthly. These can range from a morning cup of coffee from a nearby convenience store, to milk, eggs and cheese from the supermarket. Customers spend very little time deciding whether or not to purchase these items and don't typically need to read reviews or consult with friends for their opinions before they make routine purchases. Limited Decision Making When customers engage in purchases that require limited decision making, they may seek advice or a suggestion from a friend. For example, if a young professional is preparing for an interview and wants to get her hair colored the week before, she might solicit advice from friends to find out which salon does good hair coloring work. As she shops for a suit for the interview, she might also ask for suggestions on which store to go to and which brand of suit is the best. The consumer may research a few options, but the search is not as thorough, or as time consuming, as with a higher priced item. Extensive Decision Making Purchases for high priced electronics, such as a television, computer or camera, or major purchases such as a home or car require consumers to use extensive decision making. Consumers spend substantial amounts of time researching a high number of potential options before they buy. They speak with trusted friends, family, colleagues and sales professionals, and read reviews and ratings online and in consumer magazines. The decision making process lasts longer, as the consumer is investing a substantial amount of money.
  22. 22. BLACK BOX MODEL The black box model shows the interaction of stimuli, consumer characteristics, decision process and consumer responses.[3] It can be distinguished between interpersonal stimuli (between people) or intrapersonal stimuli (within people).[4] The black box model is related to the black box theory of behaviorism, where the focus is not set on the processes inside a consumer, but the relation between the stimuli and the response of the consumer. The marketing stimuli are planned and processed by the companies, whereas the environmental stimulus is given by social factors, based on the economical, political and cultural circumstances of a society. The buyer's black box contains the buyer characteristics and the decision process, which determines the buyer's response. Environmental factors Buyer's black box Buyer's response Marketing Stimuli Environmental Stimuli Buyer Characteristics Decision Process Product Price Place Promotion Economic Technological Political Cultural Demographic Natural Attitudes Motivation Perceptions Personality Lifestyle Knowledge Problem recognition Information search Alternative evaluation Purchase decision Post-purchase behaviour Product choice Brand choice Dealer choice Purchase timing Purchase amount The black box model considers the buyer's response as a result of a conscious, rational decision process, in which it is assumed that the buyer has recognized the problem. However, in reality many decisions are not made in awareness of a determined problem by the consumer.
  23. 23. PRODUCT TYPE SOFT DRINKS A grouping of similar kinds of manufactured goods or services. A product type might be used by the marketing team of a business to structure its overall marketing strategy and direct it toward optimally interested consumers. WHAT ARE SOFT DRINKS? A soft drink (also called soda, pop, coke,[1] soda pop, fizzy drink, seltzer, mineral,[2] lolly water[3] or carbonated beverage) is a beverage that typically contains carbonated water, a sweetener and a flavoring. The sweetener may be sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, fruit juice, sugar substitutes (in the case of diet drinks) or some combination of these. Soft drinks may also contain caffeine, colorings, preservatives and other ingredients. Soft drinks are called "soft" in contrast to "hard drinks" (alcoholic beverages). Small amounts of alcohol may be present in a soft drink, but the alcohol content must be less than 0.5% of the total volume[4][5] if the drink is to be considered non-alcoholic.[6] Fruit juice, tea and other such non-alcoholic beverages are technically soft drinks by this definition but are not generally referred to as such.
  24. 24. MY PRODUCTS COCA COLA Coca-Cola is a carbonated soft drink sold in stores, restaurants, and vending machines throughout the world.[1] It is produced by The Coca-Cola Company of Atlanta, Georgia, and is often referred to simply as Coke (a registered trademark of The Coca-Cola Company in the United States since March 27, 1944). Originally intended as a patent medicine when it was invented in the late 19th century by John Pemberton, Coca-Cola was bought out by businessman As a Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coke to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century. The company produces concentrate, which is then sold to licensed Coca-Cola bottlers throughout the world. The bottlers, who hold territorially exclusive contracts with the company, produce finished product in cans and bottles from the concentrate in combination with filtered water and sweeteners. The bottlers then sell, distribute and merchandise Coca-Cola to retail stores and vending machines. The Coca-Cola Company also sells concentrate for soda fountains to major restaurants and food service distributors. The Coca-Cola Company has, on occasion, introduced other cola drinks under the Coke brand name. The most common of these is Diet Coke, with others including Caffeine-Free Coca-Cola, Diet Coke Caffeine-Free, Coca-Cola Cherry, Coca-Cola Zero, Coca-Cola Vanilla, and special versions with lemon, lime or coffee. In 2013, Coke products could be found in over 200 countries worldwide, with consumers downing more than 1.8 billion company beverage servings each day.
  25. 25. PEPSI Pepsi (stylized in lowercase as pepsi, formerly stylized in uppercase as PEPSI) is a carbonated soft drink that is produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. Created and developed in 1893 and introduced as Brad's Drink, it was renamed as Pepsi-Cola on August 28, 1898, then to Pepsi in 1961, and in select areas of North America, "Pepsi-Cola Made with Real Sugar" as of 2014.
  26. 26. SPRITE Sprite is a colorless, lemon-lime flavored, caffeine-free soft drink, created by the Coca-Cola Company. It was developed in West Germany in 1959 as Fanta Klare Zitrone ("Clear Lemon Fanta") and introduced in the United States as Sprite in 1961. This was Coke's response to the popularity of 7 Up. It comes in a primarily silver, green, and blue can or a green translucent bottle with a primarily green and blue label.
  27. 27. MIRINDA Mirinda is a brand of soft drink originally created in Spain, with global distribution. The word Mirinda means "admirable" or "wonderful" in Esperanto. It is available in fruit varieties including orange, citrus, grapefruit, apple, strawberry, raspberry, pineapple, pomegrana te, banana,passionfruit, lemon, hibiscus, guarana, tangerine, watermelon[1] and grape fl avors as well as tamarind. A "citrus" flavor is also available in certain areas of the Middle East. It is part of a beverage area often referred to as the flavor segment, comprising carbonated and non-carbonated fruit-flavored beverages. The orange flavor of Mirinda now represents the majority of Mirinda sales worldwide following a major repositioning of the brand towards that flavor in the early 1990s. Mirinda has been owned by PepsiCo since 1970 [2] and is primarily commercialized outside North America. It competes with Coca-Cola's Fanta and Dr Pepper's Orange Crush or Sunkist (soft drink) brands, with flavor brands localized to individual countries. As with most soft drinks, Mirinda is available in multiple formulations of flavor, carbonation and sweetener depending on the taste of individual markets.
  28. 28. THE INDIAN HIGH SCHOOL, DUBAI QUESTIONNAIRE SAMPLE NAME: AGE: Q.1: Do you drink soft drinks?  Yes  No Q.2: In a typical week, how many soft drinks do you drink per week?  Less than once per week  1-3 times per week  3-6 times per week  6-9 times per week  More than 9 times Q.3: Which of the following soft drinks would you prefer?  Coca cola  Pepsi  Sprite  Miranda  Others _______________ Q.4: Coca cola is a drink consumed by all age groups.  Strongly disagree  Disagree  Neither disagree or agree  Agree  Strongly agree Q.5: How much the taglines given below connect itself with Coca cola. (rate on the scale 1-5, 1 being the lowest and 5 being the highest)  Thanda matlab Coca cola 1___ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5_____  Open Happiness
  29. 29. 1___ 2___ 3____ 4____ 5____ Q.6: To me the taste of Coca cola is  Extremely important  Very important  Somewhat important  Not very important  Not at all important Q.7: The way Coca Cola Company advertises its products is  Excellent : Poor  Modern : Old fashioned Q.8: If Coca cola keeps a buy 2 get 1 free offer, would you buy the drink?  Definitely buy  Probably buy  Not sure  Probably not buy  Definitely not buy Q.9: Based on your personal preference, please rank the following carbonated beverages according to taste. (Place 1 next to the brand that has the best taste then, place 2 next to the brand with the second best taste, and so forth. Remember, no two brands can have the same rating).  Coca Cola ______  Pepsi ______  Sprite ______  Miranda _______ Q.10: How do you feel about Coca Cola’s product range?  Excellent  Good  Satisfactory  Below satisfactory  Poor _______________________________________________________________________
  30. 30. ANALYSIS QUESTION 1: PEOPLE DRINKING SOFT DRINKS:- YES 21 NO 9 70% 30% YES NO
  31. 31. QUESTION 2: SOFT DRINKS DRANK BY PEOPLE IN A WEEK. LESS THAN ONCE PER WEEK 18 1-3 TIMES PER WEEK 8 3-6 TIMES PER WEEK 0 6-9 TIMES PER WEEK 3 MORE THAN 9 TIMES PER WEEK 1 LESS THAN ONCE PER WEEK 1-3 TIMES PER WEEK 3-6 TIMES PER WEEK 6-9 TIMES PER WEEK MORE THAN 9 TIMES PER WEEK 60% 10% 27% 0% 3%
  32. 32. QUESTION 3: SOFT DRINKS THAT THEY PREFER. COCA COLA 12 PEPSI 3 SPRITE 4 MIRANDA 1 OTHERS 10 COCA COLA PEPSI SPRITE MIRANDA OTHERS 40% 34% 13% 10% 3%
  33. 33. QUESTION 4: COCA COLA IS A DRINK CONSUMED BY ALL AGE GROUPS. STRONGLY DISAGREE 3 DISAGREE 3 NEITHER DISAGREE NOR AGREE 7 AGREE 14 STRONGLY AGREE 3 STRONGLY DISAGREE DISAGREE NEITHER DISAGREE NOR AGREE AGREE STRONGLY AGREE 10% 10% 23% 47% 10%
  34. 34. QUESTION 5: TAGLINE WITH WHICH PEOPLE CONNECT MORE WITH. THANDA MATLAB COCA COLA 1 3 2 3 3 11 4 6 5 7 OPEN HAPPINESS 1 4 2 4 3 10 4 3 5 9 THANDA MATLAB COCA COLA 1 2 3 4 5 7% 13% 20% 33% 27% OPEN HAPPINESS 1 2 3 4 5 7% 13% 20% 33% 27%
  35. 35. QUESTION 6: THE IMPORTANCE OF TASTE OF COCA COLA FOR THE CUSTOMERS. EXTREMELY IMPORTANT 2 VERY IMPORTANT 5 SOMEWHAT IMPORTANT 6 NOT VERY IMPORTANT 9 NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT 8 EXTREMELY IMPORTANT VERY IMPORTANT SOMEWHAT IMPORTANT NOT VERY IMPORTANT NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT 6% 17% 20% 27% 30%
  36. 36. QUESTION 7: THE WAY COCA COLA ADVERTISES ITS PRODUCTS. EXCELLENT 27 POOR 3 MORDERN 29 OLD FASHIONED 1 EXCELLENT POOR MORDERN OLD FASHIONED 45% 5% 48% 2%
  37. 37. QUESTION 8: WHEN COCA COLA KEEPS OFFERS THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE WHO WILL BUY. DEFINITELY BUY 8 PROBABLY BUY 8 NOT SURE 7 PROBABLY NOT BUY 2 DEFINITELY NOT BUY 5 DEFINITELY BUY PROBABLY BUY NOT SURE PROBABLY NOT BUY DEFINITELY NOT BUY 27% 27% 6% 23% 17%
  38. 38. QUESTION 9: CUSTOMERS RANKING ACCORDING TO THEIR PREFERANCES. COCA COLA 1 PEPSI 3 SPRITE 2 MIRINDA 4 COCA COLA PEPSI SPRITE MIRINDA 10% 30% 20% 40%
  39. 39. QUESTION 10: CUSTOMERS OPINION ABOUT COCA COLA’S PRODUCT RANGE. EXCELLENT 5 GOOD 10 SATISFACTORY 11 BELOW SATISFACTORY 2 POOR 2 EXCELLENT GOOD SATISFACTORY BELOW SATISFACTORY POOR 17% 7% 7% 36% 33%
  40. 40. CONCLUSION: Different customers have different expectations from the product. According to my analysis :  70% of the people consume cold drinks.  60% of the people have cold drinks less than once per week.  40% of the people consume Coca Cola drink.  47% of the people think that Coca Cola as a soft drink is consumed by all age groups.  Half of the respondents feel they can connect the tagline ‘THANDA MATLAB COCA COLA’ with the brand Coca Cola and half of them feel more connected with ‘OPEN HAPPINESS’.  For 30% of the people the taste of the Coca Cola is not very important because most of them don’t consume soft drinks and the others think that all soft drinks taste the same so it doesn’t matter at all.  45% of the people think Coca Cola Company’s way of advertising its products is excellent than poor and 48% think its modern than old fashioned.  54% of the people will buy Coca Cola products if there is any offer by the Company.  33% of the people think the product range is good and 36% of the people think its product range is satisfactory. Most of the people who prefer cold drinks are teenagers or people who mostly work and have work outside. The people who don’t prefer soft drinks are housewives and are aware about the consequences of drinking soft drinks. People basically buy soft drinks for their self satisfaction.
  41. 41. BIBLOGRAPHY www.google.com www.wikipedia.com www.youtube.com www.businessdictionary.com www.smallbusiness.chron.com www.knowthis.com www.theconsumerfactor.com www.consumerbuyingbehavior.net www.businesscasestudies.co.uk www.forbes.com www.slideshare.net ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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