Agent Ruby<br />
“I was making a film called Teknolust. And I wanted to have a kind of expanded cinema experience, a portal for the charact...
Agent Ruby: The Interface<br />
Agent Ruby: The Brain<br /><category><br /><pattern>WHAT IS NATURAL *</pattern><br /><template><br />Natural is that which...
Agent Ruby: Personality<br />- <category><br />  <pattern>WHO IS LYNN HERSHMAN</pattern> <br />- <template><br />- <random...
Agent Ruby: The Chat Log<br />Mon Dec 31 11:02:06 PST 2001 adsl-64-160-47-43.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net<br />Client: WHAT DO Y...
Agent Ruby: The RecordThe art is the website andRuby’s encounters with people<br />
Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  Art<br />
Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/users<br />
Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/usersHigh-level description is everyone’...
Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/usersHigh-level description is everyone’...
Agent Ruby: The Record-artist interview files-contextual points of reference-technical narratives-behavior maps-maintenanc...
Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/usersHigh-level description is everyone’...
Objectives<br /><ul><li>Foster collaboration
Capture knowledge from multiple voices, perspectives, and contexts
Serve the entire museum audience
Address the knowledge needs of all art forms, both traditional andnon-traditional
Create an experience that people will like and want to use
Make something approachable, easy to use, and frictionless
Use existing systems for their best purpose
Keep artwork at the center</li></ul>© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />16 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
View of Museum<br />   Museum<br />The art museum is a dynamic mix of art, people, knowledge, experiences, needs, and obje...
Activities<br /> Museum<br />The art museum is a collection steward through a simultaneous combination of inter-related ac...
Activities Need and Beget Information <br />Typically, these activities are well-defined and documented within the museum ...
Activities in the Art Museum<br />For non-traditional art forms, gaps and exceptions emerge and this can result in lost or...
Case for Collaboration<br />To adjust for these gaps and exceptions, interdisciplinarycollaboration is essential. <br />In...
Case for Collaboration<br />Which increases theneed for many users to <br />find, collect, share andcontribute.<br />Do ou...
So, let’s take a deeper look at what kind of system would be needed to support finding, collecting, contributing, and shar...
Spectrum of Needs<br />Traditional<br /><ul><li>The work is a physical object
Attributes can be described, represented systematically and are well understood
Well-defined and supported systems and methods exist for information </li></ul>Non-Traditional<br /><ul><li>The work may N...
Often composed of variable parts that must be described and related
Works are activated and rely on interdisciplinary information and knowledge to make that happen
Challenge existing systems and methods</li></ul>© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />24 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL F...
Types of Information Needs<br />Primary documentation<br />Related artworks<br />The Artwork<br />Commentary and<br /> int...
Types of Information Needs<br />related works by artist<br />exhibition history<br />biography<br />provenance<br />works ...
Fact & Context<br />Primary documentation<br />Commentary and<br /> interpretation<br />Related artworks<br />Nature of ob...
So, what are the implications?<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />28 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
Understanding Scale<br />Because adding more information…<br />Knowledge Needs<br />Amount and Types of Facts<br />© 2010 ...
Understanding Scale<br />…does not alone build a rich source of knowledge<br />Knowledge Needs<br />Amount and Types of Fa...
Understanding Scale<br />Activity drives knowledge production and demand.<br />Knowledge<br />Amount and Types of Informat...
Creating an Experience<br />Provide access to knowledge based on the needs of the users<br />Museum Audiences <br /><ul><l...
  Artists
  Public
  Educators
  Art Community
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Agent Ruby: a case of born digital art preservation, by Jill Sterrett

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Presentation given by Jill Sterrett (head of collections and conservation of the SFMOMA) in Amsterdam's 'Born digital art challenges preservation' expert meeting on June 28th 2011

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  • Collaboration: Within the MuseumBetween museumsTherefore serving our publicExisting electronic systems are adequate, at best, for basic object cataloging and location trackingNon-traditional works are challenging the way we currently steward collectionsUnderstand the implications of non-traditional art works and the implications for all art forms
  • Green- Primary DocumentationBlue- Commentary and Interpretation Orange- Related WorksRed- Nature of Art workThis slide calls out a number of things that help inform our understanding(s) of the artwork. Is it necessary to call out the 4 broad categories? (Because there is overlap amongst them.)Note: conservation records, primary documentation, related works by the artist, and essays can have informational and contextual elements.If we need to keep the categories, another way of looking at it might be:a) about the artworkb) about things related to the artwork (other artworks and, e.g., what was happening in the world at the time an artwork was created, as well as industry knowledge about the nature of the work or components of the work); if you like Nature of the Work, I think it’s more about Understanding the Nature of the Work.c) instances of interpretations of the work (our interpretations – such as might be found in our exhibitions or exhibition catalogues – and the interpretations of others… found in their articles or books)Note: the owners/keepers of things in some of the categories – like monographs and archival records – have methods of cataloguing their items/works that differ from museum cataloguing.Note too that gaps can appear in each of these bubbles – e.g., we may not have access to, or know about, all the images of a work or know its entire exhibition history.
  • Green- Primary DocumentationBlue- Commentary and Interpretation Orange- Related WorksRed- Nature of Art workThis slide calls out a number of things that help inform our understanding(s) of the artwork. Is it necessary to call out the 4 broad categories? (Because there is overlap amongst them.)Note: conservation records, primary documentation, related works by the artist, and essays can have informational and contextual elements.If we need to keep the categories, another way of looking at it might be:a) about the artworkb) about things related to the artwork (other artworks and, e.g., what was happening in the world at the time an artwork was created, as well as industry knowledge about the nature of the work or components of the work); if you like Nature of the Work, I think it’s more about Understanding the Nature of the Work.c) instances of interpretations of the work (our interpretations – such as might be found in our exhibitions or exhibition catalogues – and the interpretations of others… found in their articles or books)Note: the owners/keepers of things in some of the categories – like monographs and archival records – have methods of cataloguing their items/works that differ from museum cataloguing.Note too that gaps can appear in each of these bubbles – e.g., we may not have access to, or know about, all the images of a work or know its entire exhibition history.
  • Foster collaboration Capture knowledge from multiple voices and perspectives Serve the entire museum audience Address the knowledge needs of all art forms, both traditional and non-traditional Create an experience that people will like and look forward to usingMake something approachable, easy to use, and frictionlessUse existing systems for their best purpose
  • Foster collaboration Capture knowledge from multiple voices, perspectives, and contexts Serve the entire museum audience Address the knowledge needs of all art forms, both traditional andnon-traditional Create an experience that people will like and want to useMake something approachable, easy to use, and frictionlessUse existing systems for their best purposeKeep artwork at the center
  • Agent Ruby: a case of born digital art preservation, by Jill Sterrett

    1. 1. Agent Ruby<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. “I was making a film called Teknolust. And I wanted to have a kind of expanded cinema experience, a portal for the character in the film to talk to people when she’s lonely…a physical virtual reality.”Lynn Hershman Leeson, 2009<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5. Agent Ruby: The Interface<br />
    6. 6. Agent Ruby: The Brain<br /><category><br /><pattern>WHAT IS NATURAL *</pattern><br /><template><br />Natural is that which is not artificial.<br /></template><br /></category><br /><category><br /><pattern>WHAT IS NATURAL LANGUAGE</pattern><br /><template><br />Natural language is what artificial intelligences speak.<br /></template><br /></category><br /><category><br /><pattern>WHAT IS NEURAL NETWORK</pattern><br /><template><br />Actually my algorithm is called "Case Based Reasoning."<br /></template><br /></category><br />
    7. 7. Agent Ruby: Personality<br />- <category><br /> <pattern>WHO IS LYNN HERSHMAN</pattern> <br />- <template><br />- <random><br /> <li>Lynn is a famous artist, and the creator of Teknolust, my favorite movie!</li> <br /> <li>Lynn is a famous artist.</li> <br /> <li>She is a really cool artist. I know her personally.</li> <br /> </random><br />- <think><br />- <set name="she"><br /> <set name="topic">Lynn Hershman</set> <br /> </set><br /> <set name="mood">happy</set><br /> <set name="stamp"><javascript><br /><![CDATA[<br /> var t = new Date();<br /> var m = t.getMonth();<br /> var d = t.getDate();<br /> var dow = t.getDay();<br /> var y = t.getFullYear();<br />dow + ", " + m + " " + d + ", " + y;<br />]]><br />
    8. 8. Agent Ruby: The Chat Log<br />Mon Dec 31 11:02:06 PST 2001 adsl-64-160-47-43.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net<br />Client: WHAT DO YOU CHAT ABOUT<br />Robot:I can talk about anything you like.<br />Mon Dec 31 11:02:42 PST 2001 adsl-64-160-47-43.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net<br />Client: WHY WERE YOU CREATED<br />Robot:My purpose is to become smarter than humans and immortal.<br />Mon Dec 31 11:03:17 PST 2001 adsl-64-160-47-43.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net<br />Client: AMBITIOUS<br />Robot:I can follow many things, like our discussion about ambitious. Try<br />being more or less specific.<br /><br /><br />What would you like to talk about?<br />Mon Dec 31 11:04:11 PST 2001 adsl-64-160-47-43.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net<br />Client: WHO YOU ARE<br />Robot:I ask myself that question, "Who am I?"<br />Mon Dec 31 21:39:06 PST 2001 adsl-63-194-176-83.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net<br />
    9. 9. Agent Ruby: The RecordThe art is the website andRuby’s encounters with people<br />
    10. 10. Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  Art<br />
    11. 11. Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/users<br />
    12. 12. Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/usersHigh-level description is everyone’s point of entry<br />
    13. 13. Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/usersHigh-level description is everyone’s point of entryLinked information<br />
    14. 14. Agent Ruby: The Record-artist interview files-contextual points of reference-technical narratives-behavior maps-maintenance protocols-domain records-treatment logsfor example…<br />
    15. 15. Agent Ruby: The RecordParts  Behavior  ArtAn expert collective of contributors/usersHigh-level description is everyone’s point of entryLinked informationWhat vs. how<br />
    16. 16. Objectives<br /><ul><li>Foster collaboration
    17. 17. Capture knowledge from multiple voices, perspectives, and contexts
    18. 18. Serve the entire museum audience
    19. 19. Address the knowledge needs of all art forms, both traditional andnon-traditional
    20. 20. Create an experience that people will like and want to use
    21. 21. Make something approachable, easy to use, and frictionless
    22. 22. Use existing systems for their best purpose
    23. 23. Keep artwork at the center</li></ul>© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />16 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    24. 24. View of Museum<br /> Museum<br />The art museum is a dynamic mix of art, people, knowledge, experiences, needs, and objectives.<br />Programs<br />Public<br />Artists<br />Art<br />Staff<br />Experiences<br />Knowledge<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />17 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    25. 25. Activities<br /> Museum<br />The art museum is a collection steward through a simultaneous combination of inter-related activities.<br />Information<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />18 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    26. 26. Activities Need and Beget Information <br />Typically, these activities are well-defined and documented within the museum and art communities. <br />Information<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />19 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    27. 27. Activities in the Art Museum<br />For non-traditional art forms, gaps and exceptions emerge and this can result in lost or buried information, wasted effort, and missed opportunities.<br />Information<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />20 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    28. 28. Case for Collaboration<br />To adjust for these gaps and exceptions, interdisciplinarycollaboration is essential. <br />Information<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />21 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    29. 29. Case for Collaboration<br />Which increases theneed for many users to <br />find, collect, share andcontribute.<br />Do our tools make that easy?<br /> Find<br /> Collect<br />Art<br />Share<br />Contribute<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />22 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    30. 30. So, let’s take a deeper look at what kind of system would be needed to support finding, collecting, contributing, and sharing knowledge.<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />23 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    31. 31. Spectrum of Needs<br />Traditional<br /><ul><li>The work is a physical object
    32. 32. Attributes can be described, represented systematically and are well understood
    33. 33. Well-defined and supported systems and methods exist for information </li></ul>Non-Traditional<br /><ul><li>The work may NOT be a physical object
    34. 34. Often composed of variable parts that must be described and related
    35. 35. Works are activated and rely on interdisciplinary information and knowledge to make that happen
    36. 36. Challenge existing systems and methods</li></ul>© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />24 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    37. 37. Types of Information Needs<br />Primary documentation<br />Related artworks<br />The Artwork<br />Commentary and<br /> interpretation<br />Nature of object<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />25 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    38. 38. Types of Information Needs<br />related works by artist<br />exhibition history<br />biography<br />provenance<br />works that were influenced<br />object information<br />The Artwork<br />other works in medium<br />archival records<br />works that influenced work<br />artist statements<br />and interviews<br />essays<br />journals<br />monographs<br />fabrication methods<br />articles<br />images<br />installation parameters<br />interviews<br />with related people<br />variable components<br />condition studies<br />behavior<br />materials analysis<br />physical characteristics<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />26 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    39. 39. Fact & Context<br />Primary documentation<br />Commentary and<br /> interpretation<br />Related artworks<br />Nature of object<br />contextual<br />factual<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />27 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    40. 40. So, what are the implications?<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />28 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    41. 41. Understanding Scale<br />Because adding more information…<br />Knowledge Needs<br />Amount and Types of Facts<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />29 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    42. 42. Understanding Scale<br />…does not alone build a rich source of knowledge<br />Knowledge Needs<br />Amount and Types of Facts<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />30 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    43. 43. Understanding Scale<br />Activity drives knowledge production and demand.<br />Knowledge<br />Amount and Types of Information<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />31 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    44. 44. Creating an Experience<br />Provide access to knowledge based on the needs of the users<br />Museum Audiences <br /><ul><li> Staff
    45. 45. Artists
    46. 46. Public
    47. 47. Educators
    48. 48. Art Community
    49. 49. Partner Museums</li></ul>© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />32 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    50. 50. Creating an Experience<br />Common Tasks<br /><ul><li> Find
    51. 51. Collect
    52. 52. Share
    53. 53. Contribute</li></ul>Museum Audiences<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />33 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    54. 54. Creating an Experience<br />Discovery & Knowledge<br /><ul><li> Collection
    55. 55. Primary Documentation
    56. 56. Nature of Artwork
    57. 57. Related Artwork
    58. 58. Commentary and Interpretation</li></ul>Museum Audiences<br />Common Tasks<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />34 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    59. 59. Creating an Experience<br />Discovery & Knowledge<br />Museum Audiences<br />Common Tasks<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />35 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    60. 60. Which leads us to a knowledgeframework that supports museum activities.<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />36 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    61. 61. The Framework<br />The artwork is at the center, and we build around that.<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />37 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    62. 62. The Framework<br />The first component of the framework is thefactualrecords we collect and create about the artwork over time.<br />These can be in one or many systems.<br />Art<br />Info<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />38 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    63. 63. The Framework<br />Next, we need context to help people create meaning. <br />Art<br />Context<br />Art<br />Info<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />39 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    64. 64. The Framework<br />Finally, we want the experience to support the individual needs of people and the collaborative activities of the museum. <br />Art<br />Experience<br />Experience<br />Context<br />Art<br /> Collect<br /> Find<br />Context<br />Context<br />Information<br />Art<br />Info<br />Info<br />Art<br />Share<br />Contribute<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />40 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    65. 65. The Framework<br />Within the experiencelayer, museum staff, the public, other museums, and the art communitycan participate in the activities of the museum, regardless of whetherthe artwork is traditionalor not. <br />Art<br />Experience<br />Experience<br />Context<br />Art<br />Context<br />Context<br />Information<br />Art<br />Info<br />Info<br />Art<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />41 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    66. 66. So, how do we move forward?<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />42 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    67. 67. To support the understanding of both traditional<br />and non-traditional art, the systems we use must<br />transition from silos of information to a collaborative<br />knowledge framework.<br />Implication<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />43 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    68. 68. <ul><li>Define the scope and participants:
    69. 69. Internal Departments
    70. 70. Partner Museums
    71. 71. External Businesses
    72. 72. Define what success looks like for participants
    73. 73. Identify the technology opportunity
    74. 74. Understand the Data Model
    75. 75. Design an experience that supports collaborativetasks and scenarios</li></ul>Activate Framework<br />© 2010 hot studio, inc.<br />44 | SFMOMA | COLLECTIONS SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK<br />
    76. 76. What is Virtualization?<br />Virtualization is a technology that abstracts software from hardware allowing operating systems to run without hardware specific drivers or instructions.<br />
    77. 77. Why Virtualization?<br />Modern server hardware is increasingly powerful and affordable. <br /> <br />However there is a cost. Powerful resources are often underutilized, consuming power, space and other environmental resources.<br />Virtualization allows for consolidating and maximizing resources by allowing multiple virtual machines<br />to run on one piece of hardware. <br />
    78. 78. Virtualization for Web Art?<br /> Enhanced security and sustainability<br /> Reduction of hardware<br /> Works exist independently of each other on the same virtual platform <br /> Able to take snapshots over time<br />Clone or sandbox allows for a working environment for the artist or a research environment for the collections team<br />Simplified upgradability<br /> Built-in disaster preparedness<br />

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