The nun’s priest’s tale

1,818 views

Published on

The Chanticleer and the Fox

Published in: Education, Technology, Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,818
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
52
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The nun’s priest’s tale

  1. 1. One of the tales by a pilgrim going to Canterbury Cathedral
  2. 2. (may be spelled Chanticleer)a proud rooster who dreams of his approaching doom in the form of a fox.
  3. 3. Hewakes hisfavori Pertelote, the chief favourite among his seven wives.tewifeup! Pertelote, his favorite among his seven wives
  4. 4. •She assures him that he onlysuffers from indigestion•chides him for paying heed to asimple dream.
  5. 5. Chauntecleer recountsstories of prophets whoforesaw theirdeaths,dreams that cametrue,
  6. 6. There was a A fox,full of slyintentions,, who haspreviously trickedChauntecleersfather and motherto their downfall,lies in wait for him
  7. 7. The Fox’s Planthe fox plays to his preys inflated egoHe insisited that hewould love to hearChauntecleer sing just ashis amazing father did.
  8. 8. The ChanticleerStood on tiptoe with neckoutstretched and eyes closed.
  9. 9. He was promptly snatched from the yard in the fox’sjaws and slung over his back.
  10. 10. As the fox flees through the forest, with the entire barnyard giving chase,
  11. 11. Chauntecleer suggests tohis captor that he shouldstop and tell hispursuers to give up.
  12. 12. The fox opens his mouth to taunt ortease his pursuers.
  13. 13. Chauntecleer escapes from hisjaws and flies into the nearest tree
  14. 14. The fox tries in vain toconvince the waryrooster of hisrepentance and that hewon’t get him again..
  15. 15. But Chanticleer now prefers the safety of the tree and refuses to fall for the same trick a second time.
  16. 16. SOME NOTESThe word Chanticleer comesfrom Middle Englishchauntecler, from Old Frenchchantecler - from chanter, "tosing" (like chant) + cler, "clear."

×