SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 27
Download to read offline
AIM MARINE SURVEYORS
Marine surveyors & Cargo Inspectors:
The difference between an inspection and a survey? 'survey' is collection of data, where
'Inspection' is comparison with the preset criteria to accept or reject.
The professional marine surveyor is a vital part of the maritime infrastructure that keeps the shipping
industry and its ships afloat and operational. Typically from a background as a senior marine
engineer or Master Mariner, who has spent a whole career in and around ships, expertise and
experience are what the marine surveyor offers the clients.
The marine surveyor is called in to verify that things are as they are supposed to be, or to assess
what needs to be done, or to provide answers when there are problems which require specialist
expertise. AIM marine surveyor is sometimes the “third party” who can provide an independent
and objective view, or might be the expert who represents AIM principals who have commissioned
him. He (and it is still largely a male dominated profession) is likely to be a specialist in some aspect
of the marine industry, and he will be called in to deal with his sector of this specialised world. He
might be an expert in cargo surveying, or, narrowing it down further, a specialist in the carriage of
refrigerated cargo, or steel products, grain, oil, gas or chemicals. He might be the engineering
expert called in to deal with problems with fuel, vibration or corrosion and wear of machinery, or
required to assist with problems of main engines, specialist equipment, or even steam plant. Expert
marine surveyors can be found to answer any type of problem.
The “customers” of AIM marine surveyors – his “principals” whose interests he will represent could
also come from a wide variety of different areas. AIM marine surveyor could represent charterers,
verifying that a ship is suitable for the anticipated voyage, in good condition, and able to carry
the cargo safely. The AIM marine surveyor may be on hand when the cargo is loaded to make
sure it is handled properly and made safe aboard; then, when the voyage is completed, available
to ensure that it has not suffered on the voyage, and is discharged properly. He may verify
quantities of cargoes, in addition to its condition. Other AIM surveyors may represent the interests
of the ship owners, or the cargo owners. Some cargoes, like heavy lifts, paper, or steel are prone to
damage and will have surveyors on hand. AIM surveyors will have accumulated years of expertise
with various types of cargo and are often called upon to act as expert witnesses in the case of
legal disputes or arbitration.
AIM Surveyors often represent insurers in the case of claims for damage, or where there has been
a casualty. They will assess the scale of the damage, perhaps advise on mitigation, and will be
instrumental in ensuring that claims are legitimate and verifiable. Others will have built up expertise
in salvage, or machinery damage and are able to assess matters of fault and causation, so that
claims can be dealt with. Was it crew negligence that was to blame? Was there some inherent
fault in the machinery, or the consequence of heavy weather or some external circumstance? A
surveyor with the appropriate expertise will be on hand to give the right advice, to propose
solutions that will get the claim paid, or the damage repaired, and get the ship back earning
money for its owner recovery.
Marine Cargo Surveying:
The basic function of a Marine Cargo Surveyor is to inspect and report on shipping, it is consisted of
vessel’s & ship’s technical aspects and condition and damage to transported goods for insurance
purposes. The wider role, however, also covers the loading and securing of cargoes and
inspection of the discharge of cargoes and also risk assessments for transporting and storing
cargoes.
It starts by covering the duties of a surveyor and the equipment a surveyor would need to perform
the work. It continues with coverage of what a surveyor would need to do while on survey and
the documents that would have to be collected.
One of the main sections in the module covers the range of different types of ship and cargo that
a surveyor is likely to encounter and the common types of technical defects condition & damage
for each.
The module also covers how to resolve claims, determine how and where technical defects
condition & damage might have occurred and gives a suggestion as to how to present a survey
report.
It should be understood, however, that this is a basic grounding in the subject and can only be
built on through experience. Since almost every survey has different aspects and problems a
prospective surveyor will have to gain practical experience and must first attend a variety of
surveys together with an experienced surveyor before being in a position to conduct a survey
independently.
Marine Surveyor Liability:
Marine surveyors are customarily hired for two different purposes. They determine the nature,
cause and extent of a marine loss, otherwise known as a "damage survey." They also determine
the condition and valuation of a vessel as required for insurance, financing or towing, otherwise
known as a "C & V" survey. Some surveyors sub-specialize in different types of casualties and
different types of vessels, for example, tugs and barges, cargo ships, fishing vessels or private
pleasure craft. Still other marine surveyors specialize in cargo stowage and securing and/or
damage.
When performing a damage survey, AIM marine surveyors are usually retained by a vessel owner
or cargo owner or their insurer. After surveying the damaged property, they issue a report
reflecting the damage found and, if repairable, recommendations for repairing the damage or
mitigating the loss. Although they examine damaged property, marine surveyors are not insurance
adjusters and usually have no knowledge of any insurance coverage that might apply. When
performing a C & V survey, the marine surveyor makes a thorough inspection of a vessel and issues
a report reflecting deficiencies noted, recommendations for correcting the deficiencies, and
replacement and market values for vessel.
Insurance "C & V" Surveys (Condition and Valuation)
Most insurance companies require a "C & V" or Condition and Valuation survey - what most of AIM
calls an "insurance survey", on vessels that are usually ten years old and older. Sometimes they will
require one if the vessel is newer or if extensive repairs or work has been done.
Insurance "C & V" Surveys are done for the owner of the vessel and it is usually the owner that
commissions (and pays for) the survey. However, in some cases the insurance company may
commission the surveyor to inspect the vessel on its own behalf (and at its own expense). In most
cases however, the insurance company notifies the owner that it requires a "C & V survey" by a
certain date to continue the coverage. It is then up to the owner to commission (and pay for) a
survey and forward it to the insurance company. The insurance company may require this survey
on initial start-up of the policy and may require a re-survey at certain intervals - usually 5 to 7 years
but sometimes as little as 3 years.
Insurance surveys inspect the vessel for structural integrity and proper installation of systems and
proper safety gear. Insurance companies what to know if the vessel they are covering is
reasonably sound and that there are no obvious flaws that may cause a loss potential (the
"Condition" part of a C & V). Basically, the C & V survey reports on the safety and seaworthiness of
the vessel. A value is then determined for vessel (the Value part of C & V).
Insurance surveys generally inspect the vessel for the same structural integrity and proper
installation of systems as the Pre-Purchase survey but unlike the Pre-Purchase survey, systems are
not usually operated and secondary and minor deficiencies are not generally reported in a
detailed sense. A C & V survey is sort of like a "de-tuned" Pre-Purchase survey. Hence, the survey
usually costs less. If you are purchasing a boat and need to get insurance a Pre-Purchase Survey
can be used as a C & V.
Most insurance companies will accept a C & V survey with the vessel in the water, however,
sometimes they either may require it to be out of the water or underwater diving survey together. If
your insurance requires to get a survey when the vessel is in the water ask them if an "in water"
survey is acceptable before proceeding with the survey. If your vessel is out for winter storage (Dry-
docking) and you know you need a C & V survey, try to get it before the vessel is launched or
underwater diving survey together.
The Basis of Liability of Marine Surveyors
Some courts have held a warranty of workmanlike service is implied in marine surveying contracts
just as it is implied in other maritime contracts such as towing contracts or ship repair contracts.
Breach of that warranty has led to the imposition of liability on marine surveyors when the breach
proximately caused a loss. Other courts have held the implied warranty inapplicable and used a
negligence standard to determine liability. In either case, a finding of liability can lead to
potentially devastating financial consequences for marine surveyors because often they do not
have professional liability insurance.
In determining whether a surveyor breached the implied warranty or was negligent, courts
consider what the surveyor was retained to do and whether the surveyor performed in a
reasonable manner. A hull surveyor has been held to have two duties that must be performed with
due care:
1) surveying the vessel in accordance with the applicable rules and regulations and
2) detecting defects in the vessel and notifying the vessel owner about them.
A marine surveyor is not, however, the guarantor of the seaworthiness of a vessel and a
certificate of seaworthiness from a marine surveyor is not conclusive as to the seaworthiness of
a vessel.
3) others
A Marine surveyor (including "Ship & Vessel Surveyor", "Hull & Machinery Surveyor" and/or "Cargo
Surveyor") is a person who conducts inspections, surveys or examinations of marine vessels to
assess, monitor and report on their condition and the products on them, as well as inspects
damage caused to both vessels and cargo. Marine surveyors also inspect equipment intended for
new or existing vessels to ensure compliance with various standards or specifications. Marine
surveys typically include the structure, machinery and equipment (navigational, safety, radio, etc.)
and general condition of a vessel and/or cargo. It also includes judging materials on board and
their condition. Because certifications and subsequently payments are processed only after the
surveyor has expressed his or her satisfaction, a marine surveyor holds a prestigious position and is
held with much regard in the shipbuilding industry. Marine Surveyors are highly qualified and
technically sound and are usually selected after thorough evaluation procedures as vessels
ranging from small ferries to enormous crude oil carriers and cruise liners are approved to sail into
the high seas based purely on their judgment, competence and integrity.
Marine surveying is often closely associated with marine insurance, damage and salvage,
accident and fraud investigation as insurers generally lack the training and skills required to
perform a detailed assessment of the condition of a vessel. While marine surveyors are sometimes
employed by insurers directly they maintain a certain professional autonomy in order to provide an
unbiased view. Independent marine surveyors are often employed by the clients of marine insurers
to provide evidence in support of damage claims made against the insurer. Insurance companies
cannot require customers to use specific marine surveyors (although they often provide a list of
recommended or pre-approved marine surveyors who are known to them).
Marine surveyors use many credentials, letters, and terms such as "accredited", "certified",
"qualified", " ACMS", "AMS", "CMS", etc. There are many ways to train to become a marine surveyor
including taking correspondence courses, apprenticing, or simply opening a business. However,
marine surveyors pursue their profession independently of required organizations, and there is
currently no national or international licensing requirement for marine surveyors.
Qualifications for a Marine Surveyor, though the list is long, can be summed up in the following:
Working knowledge of ship's electrical & mechanical systems, fundamental understanding of
boats, ships & motor vessels design & construction, and one of the most important; Time spend at
sea (seafarer)
A marine surveyor may perform the following tasks:
General Duties of a marine surveyor
 Conduct surveys throughout the ship's life (building new ship, annual survey, interim survey,
special survey) to ensure standards are maintained; (examine and approve design plans of
hulls and equipment, such as main propulsion engines, auxiliary boilers and turbines, electrical
power generating plant, refrigeration and air conditioning plant and pumping systems . . .)
 Perform inspections required by domestic statutes and international conventions by
the International Maritime Organization (IMO); inspect standards of construction and witness
tests of materials, inspect hulls, machinery and equipment during ship construction to ensure
standards and legislative requirements are met
 Witness tests and operation of emergency and safety machinery and equipment;
 Measure ships for tonnage and survey them for load line assignment;
 Attend court as an expert witness and assist in coroner's inquiries;
 Investigate marine accidents.
 Determine "Fair Market Value, "Damage Repair Costs", and Replacement Value".
 Investigate marine accidents.
AIM Marine surveyors carry out inspections of all of types of passenger and cargo ships,
commercial charter craft, fishing vessels, recreational craft and yachts called Motor Vessels,
namely:
 Marine Engineer
 Mechanical Engineer
 Naval Architect
 Ship's Officer
Types of marine surveyor
Government surveyor
A government surveyor performs ship registration surveys, surveys of foreign-going ships and local
craft, and generally enforces ship safety standards to insure marine industrial safety. Government-
appointed AIM marine surveyors, also called marine inspectors in some countries, belong to two
groups that are not mutually exclusive: Flag State surveyors report to the government with whom
the vessel is registered, and Port State surveyors report to the government into whose territory the
vessel has entered. The Port State surveyors usually have the authority to detain vessels considered
to have defects that may result in adverse impacts on life or the environment. Based on their
government's legal framework, Flag State surveyors can impose conditions on the vessel such that
failure to comply will result in the registration of the vessel being suspended or withdrawn. In this
event, the vessel will find it almost impossible to trade.
Cargo surveyor
AIM Cargo surveyor is normally appointed by the Cargo Owner , mostly for Bulk . Grain Cargo. His
job is to perform the draft survey to determine the actual cargo loaded on board. He also confirms
that the cargo loading is performed according to the law and is within the loadable limits The
vessel safety is also ascertain which include momentum involves due to cargo shift which may
render the vessel unsafe during the passage.
Classification surveyor
The surveyor of a classification society represents the classification society. The class has only one
certificate which nowadays can be compared with the safety construction
A classification surveyor inspects ships to make sure that the ship, its components and machinery
are built and maintained according to the standards required for their class. Classification
surveyors often have two roles: one is as a representative of the classification society; and the
other as an inspector on behalf of the country with which the vessel is registered (the flag state).
The classification role is to ensure that during construction the vessel initially complies with the
classification society's rules for construction and outfitting, and thereafter is maintained fit to
proceed trading. The Flag State role is based on a clear set of guidelines issued by the registering
country. On satisfactory completion of any survey, the classification surveyor makes
recommendations to the classification society and/or the flag state. These may be that the vessel
has a clean bill of health, or that various defects must be corrected within a given time.
The class society can withdraw the class certificate of the ship. As a valid class certificate is
mandatory by SOLAS, the class has inform the Flag State and Port State as soon as the class
certificate is withdrawn. If the class certificate is withdrawn, then the Safety Construction
Certificate become invalid as well. SOLAS declares the Class Society as mandatory.
Although the classification societies started in 1760 with captains who will examine a ship, more
specialization came and now there are in principle there three kind of surveyors, ex-navigational,
ex-mechanical / electrical and naval architects. In most cases you will find the navigational
inspectors as the flag state inspectors and auditors.
The classification society uses the mechanical / electrical inspectors. They will start in the engine
room and will learn the hull part in their inspection career. The hull surveyors are in a perfect world
only naval architects. The auditors in the classification society can have navigational background
but normally the surveyor with experience will become auditor. Although you will think that every
class surveyor is entitled to inspect everything, this is however not the case.
AIM independent marine surveyor
AIM independent marine surveyor may be asked to carry out a wide range of tasks, including
examining ships' cargoes or onboard conditions such as fuel quality; investigating accidents at sea
(e.g., oil spillages or failure of machinery or structures which are not considered to be critical); and
preparing accident reports for insurance purposes, and conducting draught surveys to analyse
how much cargo has been lost or gained.
AIM independent marine surveyors also carry out condition surveys or pre-purchase surveys to
determine the condition of the ship prior to charter or an acquisition. Many companies as P&I
clubs, ship-owners, brokers, etc. employ or contract the services of a private marine surveyor in
order to determine the condition of the ship.
Association of certified marine surveyors:
 National Association of Marine Surveyors
 Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors
 Navtech Marine Surveyor Education US Surveyors Association
 Vessel safety survey
 Association of Certified Marine Surveyors
The different roles of Maritime Inspectors, Surveyors and Auditors
Maritime inspectors come in different roles, names and they work for different organizations.
Depending on their title, the role can more or less be distinguished. In short the maritime inspector
works normally as third party, as vetting or for an insurance company.
Flag State Maritime Inspectors
The certificates from the Flag State are :
1. Safety Equipment
2. Safety Construction
3. Safety Radio
4. MARPOL (annex I till VI)
5. Load Line
6. ISM
7. ISPS
8. MLC
Nowadays more and more administrations outsource the inspection to recognized classification
societies. The surveyors of the class society have the same rights and obligations as the Flag State
inspector only when the surveyor finds deficiencies, the class has also to inform the Flag State. In
case a certificate is withdrawn both the Port State as the Flag State has to be informed.
This outsourcing process from the Flag State to the recognized class society is controlled by
auditors from the flag state and is described by SOLAS.
Another possibility is that the Flag State will only inspect one of more certificates and leave the rest
to the recognized classification society. In this case the Flag State still got a first-hand impression on
the vessel while some technical inspections are done by the class.
ISM and ISPS Auditors
The auditor evaluates a system by taken sample points. In this case the ISM and ISPS audits on
board of a ship and in the office. This topic belongs to SOLAS and therefore to the administration,
but like other inspections this is often outsourced to any recognized classification society. This
means that the class surveyor and the auditors can be from different recognized organizations.
This will bring us to the auditors from the administration and region. As soon as you outsource
specific products you need to establish a control on these products. In this case
the products are inspections and audits. This means that the quality system of the recognized
classification society has to be evaluated by the Flag State auditors or region auditors.
The qualification system of a recognized classification society can be from IACS or an ISO 9001. This
means that IACS auditor, the 9001 auditor, the flag state auditor and the region auditor like EU
auditor will visit the headquarters of the class society and some satellite offices. The advantages
are that with more auditors from different kind of samples will be taken and evaluated.
Although this looks like a painful process, the result is that the quality system of the recognized
classification society becomes better and better.
MLC inspectors
The MLC inspector is new in the field. The convention belongs to the ILO and is organised by the
IMO, so the certificate belongs to the administration. Most of the times
MLC inspector will be a surveyor and/or auditor from any recognized class society. So the owner is
free in his choice if the Flag outsource this part to a recognized organization.
Port Sate Control Office
The IMO released a resolution A.1052(27) with guidelines for the behavior of the port state control
officer. Also the reasons for detentions are given In this resolution. In general the port state officer
will have limited time to inspect a vessel. So if they have several ships in one day, the inspection will
be focused on the certificates with a small round.
Class societies like to help their clients with keeping track of the reasons of detentions and
publishing these on their websites. Although a port state officer has limited time, he can always
cancel another vessel from his schedule when the first few impressions are below standard. First
impression is the general look of the ship from outside, second impression is the gangway, third
impression is the behavior of the man at the gangway, fourth impressions is the walk over deck
to the accommodation, fifth impression is the walk through the accommodation to the bridge, the
office or to the master’s cabin. Here the impressions will continue with the behavior of the master
and the organisation of the paper work. So the first 5 impressions will tell the port state officer a lot
about his time schedule.
The port state officer can detain a vessel and has the authority to request a flag state and/or the
recognized class society to carry out inspections according a specific certificate on the vessel. In
this case the flag state is authorized to visit the ship, only the class society has to wait till the
management of the ship also invites them to the ship, as they are the class society’s client. After
the inspection of the flag the port state will visit the ship again for a re-inspection before the port
state will release the ship.
For tankers above 10 years there is a rule that they have to request also for an extensive port state
inspection. Tankers in general have also more extensive inspections by class and flag state. Besides
this they can expect the inspections by the vetting inspectors of the owners of the cargo. Vetting
inspectors follows the rules and regulations of the cargo owner.
Other Maritime Inspectors
Other maritime inspectors are working for a underwriter or for a oil/chemical or gas company. So in
general other inspectors work for a company and the don’t deal with the certification but with the
money. The underwriter works for a small company and will only be seen if damage repair is
expensive enough. The owner will invite him and the surveyor will be tracking the finance of
the repairs and is trying to find the cause of the damage.
The vetting inspector can work directly for an oil company or can be hired by an oil company.
Vetting is looking at the background before giving a contract. For the management of the tankers
which are not owned by the oil companies, this vetting is important as it means that they will get
the charter or not. So in this case even more money is at stake.
Third Party Maritime Inspectors:
Third Party Maritime Inspectors can be ordered by the ships management when a technical report
is needed. This can be at the beginning of a charter, but often during the sale of a ship a third
party is invited.
Other inspectors can be seen at the end of beginning of a charter. For example the amount of
fuel has to be determined. So with normal book keeping of fuel and lubricating oil
consumption, much money will be on stake.
Still other inspectors, like quarantine, police and customs will visit the ship but these belongs to the
daily business of any kind of travelling.
Kind regards,
Dr Capt. Nguyen Te Nhan / G.D
Agriculture - Industry - Marine Survey & Inspection Group
-------------------------------------------------------
Tel : +84-8-3832-7204
Fax : +84-8-3832-8393
Cell. : +84903615612
E-mail: aimcontrol@aimcontrolgroup.com
inspection@aimcontrolgroup.com
MSN : aimcontrol@hotmail.com
Skype: aimcontrol
http://www.aimcontrolgroup.com
------------------------------------------------------
Contact:
For further information, please contact:
Dr Capt. Nguyen Te Nhan, General Director
Agriculture – Industry – Marine Control Inspection Group
(AIM Control)
Tel/Fax: +84 8 38327204 / +84 8 38328393
E-mail: aimcontrol@aimcontrolgroup.com
Or visit our website at:
www.aimcontrolgroup.com

More Related Content

What's hot

TSR Issue 158 - Cracking the Code
TSR Issue 158 - Cracking the CodeTSR Issue 158 - Cracking the Code
TSR Issue 158 - Cracking the CodeMalcolm Jacotine
 
Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018
Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018
Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018Marexmedia
 
205073848 transpo-11-20
205073848 transpo-11-20205073848 transpo-11-20
205073848 transpo-11-20homeworkping7
 
Ap police-recruitment
Ap police-recruitmentAp police-recruitment
Ap police-recruitmentKanta Singh
 
peter resume redux
peter resume reduxpeter resume redux
peter resume reduxPeter Grocut
 
Psc pocket checklist
Psc pocket checklistPsc pocket checklist
Psc pocket checklistTevay Sayha
 
Survey and examination of ships' lifting appliances
Survey and examination of ships' lifting appliancesSurvey and examination of ships' lifting appliances
Survey and examination of ships' lifting appliancestienbzeo
 
DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)
DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)
DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)Drew Schaefer
 
M A R I N E I N D U S T R Y
M A R I N E  I N D U S T R YM A R I N E  I N D U S T R Y
M A R I N E I N D U S T R YICFRITH
 
Set 1 certificates and survey
Set 1 certificates and surveySet 1 certificates and survey
Set 1 certificates and surveyMaanas Gopinath
 
Management of Charterparty for Oil Tankers
Management of Charterparty for Oil TankersManagement of Charterparty for Oil Tankers
Management of Charterparty for Oil TankerspetroEDGE
 
STCW Basic Safety Training
STCW Basic Safety TrainingSTCW Basic Safety Training
STCW Basic Safety TrainingMatthew Peck
 
_______ uk-masters-orals
  _______ uk-masters-orals  _______ uk-masters-orals
_______ uk-masters-oralsRabah HELAL
 

What's hot (20)

TSR Issue 158 - Cracking the Code
TSR Issue 158 - Cracking the CodeTSR Issue 158 - Cracking the Code
TSR Issue 158 - Cracking the Code
 
Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018
Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018
Insight into Ship Operations - Rahul Bhargav Academic Conference 2018
 
205073848 transpo-11-20
205073848 transpo-11-20205073848 transpo-11-20
205073848 transpo-11-20
 
Inspections of Safety Gear
Inspections of Safety GearInspections of Safety Gear
Inspections of Safety Gear
 
Ap police-recruitment
Ap police-recruitmentAp police-recruitment
Ap police-recruitment
 
peter resume redux
peter resume reduxpeter resume redux
peter resume redux
 
Inspections On Board
Inspections On BoardInspections On Board
Inspections On Board
 
Vessel General Permit
Vessel General PermitVessel General Permit
Vessel General Permit
 
Psc pocket checklist
Psc pocket checklistPsc pocket checklist
Psc pocket checklist
 
Survey and examination of ships' lifting appliances
Survey and examination of ships' lifting appliancesSurvey and examination of ships' lifting appliances
Survey and examination of ships' lifting appliances
 
Oral questions
  Oral questions  Oral questions
Oral questions
 
DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)
DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)
DrewA.Schaeferresume.docx (7)
 
M A R I N E I N D U S T R Y
M A R I N E  I N D U S T R YM A R I N E  I N D U S T R Y
M A R I N E I N D U S T R Y
 
Set 1 certificates and survey
Set 1 certificates and surveySet 1 certificates and survey
Set 1 certificates and survey
 
Management of Charterparty for Oil Tankers
Management of Charterparty for Oil TankersManagement of Charterparty for Oil Tankers
Management of Charterparty for Oil Tankers
 
STCW Basic Safety Training
STCW Basic Safety TrainingSTCW Basic Safety Training
STCW Basic Safety Training
 
_______ uk-masters-orals
  _______ uk-masters-orals  _______ uk-masters-orals
_______ uk-masters-orals
 
Psc checklist
Psc checklistPsc checklist
Psc checklist
 
Seafarers post covid
Seafarers post covidSeafarers post covid
Seafarers post covid
 
Ap1358 c%20pdf
Ap1358 c%20pdfAp1358 c%20pdf
Ap1358 c%20pdf
 

Viewers also liked

Lightbox t2 noi bai airport unique ads
Lightbox t2 noi bai airport unique adsLightbox t2 noi bai airport unique ads
Lightbox t2 noi bai airport unique adsminhnghiemunique
 
iie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailable
iie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailableiie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailable
iie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailableJoshua Mokhari
 
SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010
SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010
SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010Aaron Dunn
 

Viewers also liked (6)

DUG2006 FOM3836
DUG2006 FOM3836DUG2006 FOM3836
DUG2006 FOM3836
 
Excel practica-02
Excel practica-02Excel practica-02
Excel practica-02
 
Lightbox t2 noi bai airport unique ads
Lightbox t2 noi bai airport unique adsLightbox t2 noi bai airport unique ads
Lightbox t2 noi bai airport unique ads
 
iie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailable
iie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailableiie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailable
iie bcom combined 2016 v2 5 oct 2015 emailable
 
SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010
SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010
SMSF borrowing strategies - Sept 2010
 
Teoriapto
TeoriaptoTeoriapto
Teoriapto
 

Similar to AIM MARINE SURVEYORS

PRM40_16-18_Cover story
PRM40_16-18_Cover storyPRM40_16-18_Cover story
PRM40_16-18_Cover storyAftab Hasan
 
Laid up vessel reactivation guide- West of England
Laid up vessel reactivation guide- West of EnglandLaid up vessel reactivation guide- West of England
Laid up vessel reactivation guide- West of EnglandDeva RG
 
Why are warships not classed?
Why are warships not classed?Why are warships not classed?
Why are warships not classed?Akhil Saxena
 
Gavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insure
Gavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insureGavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insure
Gavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insureMarexmedia
 
Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review
Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review
Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review QuestMarineMarketing
 
Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...
Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...
Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...Marexmedia
 
Insurance claim investigation
Insurance claim investigationInsurance claim investigation
Insurance claim investigationInspection Cargo
 
58056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 2015
58056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 201558056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 2015
58056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 2015Sven Polter
 
Akabogu & Associates Newsletter
Akabogu & Associates NewsletterAkabogu & Associates Newsletter
Akabogu & Associates NewsletterNgozi Medani
 
Transocean offshore operation 6
Transocean   offshore operation 6Transocean   offshore operation 6
Transocean offshore operation 6Steffones K
 
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015James Gardiner
 
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015James Gardiner
 

Similar to AIM MARINE SURVEYORS (20)

Marine warranty surveyors
Marine warranty surveyorsMarine warranty surveyors
Marine warranty surveyors
 
Marine insurance
Marine insuranceMarine insurance
Marine insurance
 
PRM40_16-18_Cover story
PRM40_16-18_Cover storyPRM40_16-18_Cover story
PRM40_16-18_Cover story
 
Laid up vessel reactivation guide- West of England
Laid up vessel reactivation guide- West of EnglandLaid up vessel reactivation guide- West of England
Laid up vessel reactivation guide- West of England
 
Why are warships not classed?
Why are warships not classed?Why are warships not classed?
Why are warships not classed?
 
Gavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insure
Gavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insureGavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insure
Gavin Ritchie - Insuring Shipping Risks, What and How much to insure
 
Marine_Insurance_Essentials.ppt
Marine_Insurance_Essentials.pptMarine_Insurance_Essentials.ppt
Marine_Insurance_Essentials.ppt
 
allo
alloallo
allo
 
Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review
Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review
Marine Surveyor’s Role in Risk Assessment & Management Review
 
Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...
Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...
Accidents and Operational Risks - Owners and Charterers Liabilities - Capt Go...
 
On hire and off-hire vessel condition surveys
On hire and off-hire vessel condition surveysOn hire and off-hire vessel condition surveys
On hire and off-hire vessel condition surveys
 
Insurance claim investigation
Insurance claim investigationInsurance claim investigation
Insurance claim investigation
 
58056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 2015
58056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 201558056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 2015
58056 - Braemar SA Company Brochure March 2015
 
Greg Eames Resume new
Greg Eames Resume newGreg Eames Resume new
Greg Eames Resume new
 
Group 6 Insurance.pptx
Group 6 Insurance.pptxGroup 6 Insurance.pptx
Group 6 Insurance.pptx
 
Akabogu & Associates Newsletter
Akabogu & Associates NewsletterAkabogu & Associates Newsletter
Akabogu & Associates Newsletter
 
Transocean offshore operation 6
Transocean   offshore operation 6Transocean   offshore operation 6
Transocean offshore operation 6
 
marine insurance.pptx
marine insurance.pptxmarine insurance.pptx
marine insurance.pptx
 
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
 
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
Container Seminar Flyer Singapore 2015
 

AIM MARINE SURVEYORS

  • 1. AIM MARINE SURVEYORS Marine surveyors & Cargo Inspectors: The difference between an inspection and a survey? 'survey' is collection of data, where 'Inspection' is comparison with the preset criteria to accept or reject. The professional marine surveyor is a vital part of the maritime infrastructure that keeps the shipping industry and its ships afloat and operational. Typically from a background as a senior marine engineer or Master Mariner, who has spent a whole career in and around ships, expertise and experience are what the marine surveyor offers the clients. The marine surveyor is called in to verify that things are as they are supposed to be, or to assess what needs to be done, or to provide answers when there are problems which require specialist expertise. AIM marine surveyor is sometimes the “third party” who can provide an independent and objective view, or might be the expert who represents AIM principals who have commissioned him. He (and it is still largely a male dominated profession) is likely to be a specialist in some aspect of the marine industry, and he will be called in to deal with his sector of this specialised world. He might be an expert in cargo surveying, or, narrowing it down further, a specialist in the carriage of refrigerated cargo, or steel products, grain, oil, gas or chemicals. He might be the engineering expert called in to deal with problems with fuel, vibration or corrosion and wear of machinery, or required to assist with problems of main engines, specialist equipment, or even steam plant. Expert marine surveyors can be found to answer any type of problem.
  • 2. The “customers” of AIM marine surveyors – his “principals” whose interests he will represent could also come from a wide variety of different areas. AIM marine surveyor could represent charterers, verifying that a ship is suitable for the anticipated voyage, in good condition, and able to carry the cargo safely. The AIM marine surveyor may be on hand when the cargo is loaded to make sure it is handled properly and made safe aboard; then, when the voyage is completed, available to ensure that it has not suffered on the voyage, and is discharged properly. He may verify quantities of cargoes, in addition to its condition. Other AIM surveyors may represent the interests of the ship owners, or the cargo owners. Some cargoes, like heavy lifts, paper, or steel are prone to damage and will have surveyors on hand. AIM surveyors will have accumulated years of expertise
  • 3. with various types of cargo and are often called upon to act as expert witnesses in the case of legal disputes or arbitration. AIM Surveyors often represent insurers in the case of claims for damage, or where there has been a casualty. They will assess the scale of the damage, perhaps advise on mitigation, and will be instrumental in ensuring that claims are legitimate and verifiable. Others will have built up expertise in salvage, or machinery damage and are able to assess matters of fault and causation, so that claims can be dealt with. Was it crew negligence that was to blame? Was there some inherent fault in the machinery, or the consequence of heavy weather or some external circumstance? A surveyor with the appropriate expertise will be on hand to give the right advice, to propose solutions that will get the claim paid, or the damage repaired, and get the ship back earning money for its owner recovery. Marine Cargo Surveying: The basic function of a Marine Cargo Surveyor is to inspect and report on shipping, it is consisted of vessel’s & ship’s technical aspects and condition and damage to transported goods for insurance purposes. The wider role, however, also covers the loading and securing of cargoes and inspection of the discharge of cargoes and also risk assessments for transporting and storing cargoes. It starts by covering the duties of a surveyor and the equipment a surveyor would need to perform the work. It continues with coverage of what a surveyor would need to do while on survey and the documents that would have to be collected. One of the main sections in the module covers the range of different types of ship and cargo that a surveyor is likely to encounter and the common types of technical defects condition & damage for each.
  • 4. The module also covers how to resolve claims, determine how and where technical defects condition & damage might have occurred and gives a suggestion as to how to present a survey report. It should be understood, however, that this is a basic grounding in the subject and can only be built on through experience. Since almost every survey has different aspects and problems a prospective surveyor will have to gain practical experience and must first attend a variety of surveys together with an experienced surveyor before being in a position to conduct a survey independently. Marine Surveyor Liability: Marine surveyors are customarily hired for two different purposes. They determine the nature, cause and extent of a marine loss, otherwise known as a "damage survey." They also determine the condition and valuation of a vessel as required for insurance, financing or towing, otherwise known as a "C & V" survey. Some surveyors sub-specialize in different types of casualties and different types of vessels, for example, tugs and barges, cargo ships, fishing vessels or private pleasure craft. Still other marine surveyors specialize in cargo stowage and securing and/or damage. When performing a damage survey, AIM marine surveyors are usually retained by a vessel owner or cargo owner or their insurer. After surveying the damaged property, they issue a report reflecting the damage found and, if repairable, recommendations for repairing the damage or mitigating the loss. Although they examine damaged property, marine surveyors are not insurance adjusters and usually have no knowledge of any insurance coverage that might apply. When performing a C & V survey, the marine surveyor makes a thorough inspection of a vessel and issues a report reflecting deficiencies noted, recommendations for correcting the deficiencies, and replacement and market values for vessel.
  • 5.
  • 6. Insurance "C & V" Surveys (Condition and Valuation) Most insurance companies require a "C & V" or Condition and Valuation survey - what most of AIM calls an "insurance survey", on vessels that are usually ten years old and older. Sometimes they will require one if the vessel is newer or if extensive repairs or work has been done. Insurance "C & V" Surveys are done for the owner of the vessel and it is usually the owner that commissions (and pays for) the survey. However, in some cases the insurance company may commission the surveyor to inspect the vessel on its own behalf (and at its own expense). In most cases however, the insurance company notifies the owner that it requires a "C & V survey" by a certain date to continue the coverage. It is then up to the owner to commission (and pay for) a survey and forward it to the insurance company. The insurance company may require this survey on initial start-up of the policy and may require a re-survey at certain intervals - usually 5 to 7 years but sometimes as little as 3 years. Insurance surveys inspect the vessel for structural integrity and proper installation of systems and proper safety gear. Insurance companies what to know if the vessel they are covering is reasonably sound and that there are no obvious flaws that may cause a loss potential (the "Condition" part of a C & V). Basically, the C & V survey reports on the safety and seaworthiness of the vessel. A value is then determined for vessel (the Value part of C & V). Insurance surveys generally inspect the vessel for the same structural integrity and proper installation of systems as the Pre-Purchase survey but unlike the Pre-Purchase survey, systems are not usually operated and secondary and minor deficiencies are not generally reported in a detailed sense. A C & V survey is sort of like a "de-tuned" Pre-Purchase survey. Hence, the survey usually costs less. If you are purchasing a boat and need to get insurance a Pre-Purchase Survey can be used as a C & V.
  • 7. Most insurance companies will accept a C & V survey with the vessel in the water, however, sometimes they either may require it to be out of the water or underwater diving survey together. If your insurance requires to get a survey when the vessel is in the water ask them if an "in water" survey is acceptable before proceeding with the survey. If your vessel is out for winter storage (Dry- docking) and you know you need a C & V survey, try to get it before the vessel is launched or underwater diving survey together. The Basis of Liability of Marine Surveyors Some courts have held a warranty of workmanlike service is implied in marine surveying contracts just as it is implied in other maritime contracts such as towing contracts or ship repair contracts. Breach of that warranty has led to the imposition of liability on marine surveyors when the breach proximately caused a loss. Other courts have held the implied warranty inapplicable and used a negligence standard to determine liability. In either case, a finding of liability can lead to
  • 8. potentially devastating financial consequences for marine surveyors because often they do not have professional liability insurance. In determining whether a surveyor breached the implied warranty or was negligent, courts consider what the surveyor was retained to do and whether the surveyor performed in a reasonable manner. A hull surveyor has been held to have two duties that must be performed with due care: 1) surveying the vessel in accordance with the applicable rules and regulations and 2) detecting defects in the vessel and notifying the vessel owner about them. A marine surveyor is not, however, the guarantor of the seaworthiness of a vessel and a certificate of seaworthiness from a marine surveyor is not conclusive as to the seaworthiness of a vessel. 3) others
  • 9.
  • 10. A Marine surveyor (including "Ship & Vessel Surveyor", "Hull & Machinery Surveyor" and/or "Cargo Surveyor") is a person who conducts inspections, surveys or examinations of marine vessels to assess, monitor and report on their condition and the products on them, as well as inspects damage caused to both vessels and cargo. Marine surveyors also inspect equipment intended for new or existing vessels to ensure compliance with various standards or specifications. Marine surveys typically include the structure, machinery and equipment (navigational, safety, radio, etc.) and general condition of a vessel and/or cargo. It also includes judging materials on board and their condition. Because certifications and subsequently payments are processed only after the surveyor has expressed his or her satisfaction, a marine surveyor holds a prestigious position and is held with much regard in the shipbuilding industry. Marine Surveyors are highly qualified and technically sound and are usually selected after thorough evaluation procedures as vessels ranging from small ferries to enormous crude oil carriers and cruise liners are approved to sail into the high seas based purely on their judgment, competence and integrity. Marine surveying is often closely associated with marine insurance, damage and salvage, accident and fraud investigation as insurers generally lack the training and skills required to perform a detailed assessment of the condition of a vessel. While marine surveyors are sometimes employed by insurers directly they maintain a certain professional autonomy in order to provide an unbiased view. Independent marine surveyors are often employed by the clients of marine insurers to provide evidence in support of damage claims made against the insurer. Insurance companies cannot require customers to use specific marine surveyors (although they often provide a list of recommended or pre-approved marine surveyors who are known to them). Marine surveyors use many credentials, letters, and terms such as "accredited", "certified", "qualified", " ACMS", "AMS", "CMS", etc. There are many ways to train to become a marine surveyor including taking correspondence courses, apprenticing, or simply opening a business. However,
  • 11. marine surveyors pursue their profession independently of required organizations, and there is currently no national or international licensing requirement for marine surveyors. Qualifications for a Marine Surveyor, though the list is long, can be summed up in the following: Working knowledge of ship's electrical & mechanical systems, fundamental understanding of boats, ships & motor vessels design & construction, and one of the most important; Time spend at sea (seafarer)
  • 12. A marine surveyor may perform the following tasks: General Duties of a marine surveyor  Conduct surveys throughout the ship's life (building new ship, annual survey, interim survey, special survey) to ensure standards are maintained; (examine and approve design plans of hulls and equipment, such as main propulsion engines, auxiliary boilers and turbines, electrical power generating plant, refrigeration and air conditioning plant and pumping systems . . .)  Perform inspections required by domestic statutes and international conventions by the International Maritime Organization (IMO); inspect standards of construction and witness tests of materials, inspect hulls, machinery and equipment during ship construction to ensure standards and legislative requirements are met  Witness tests and operation of emergency and safety machinery and equipment;  Measure ships for tonnage and survey them for load line assignment;  Attend court as an expert witness and assist in coroner's inquiries;  Investigate marine accidents.  Determine "Fair Market Value, "Damage Repair Costs", and Replacement Value".  Investigate marine accidents.
  • 13. AIM Marine surveyors carry out inspections of all of types of passenger and cargo ships, commercial charter craft, fishing vessels, recreational craft and yachts called Motor Vessels, namely:  Marine Engineer  Mechanical Engineer  Naval Architect  Ship's Officer
  • 14. Types of marine surveyor Government surveyor A government surveyor performs ship registration surveys, surveys of foreign-going ships and local craft, and generally enforces ship safety standards to insure marine industrial safety. Government- appointed AIM marine surveyors, also called marine inspectors in some countries, belong to two groups that are not mutually exclusive: Flag State surveyors report to the government with whom the vessel is registered, and Port State surveyors report to the government into whose territory the vessel has entered. The Port State surveyors usually have the authority to detain vessels considered to have defects that may result in adverse impacts on life or the environment. Based on their government's legal framework, Flag State surveyors can impose conditions on the vessel such that failure to comply will result in the registration of the vessel being suspended or withdrawn. In this event, the vessel will find it almost impossible to trade.
  • 15. Cargo surveyor AIM Cargo surveyor is normally appointed by the Cargo Owner , mostly for Bulk . Grain Cargo. His job is to perform the draft survey to determine the actual cargo loaded on board. He also confirms that the cargo loading is performed according to the law and is within the loadable limits The vessel safety is also ascertain which include momentum involves due to cargo shift which may render the vessel unsafe during the passage.
  • 16. Classification surveyor The surveyor of a classification society represents the classification society. The class has only one certificate which nowadays can be compared with the safety construction A classification surveyor inspects ships to make sure that the ship, its components and machinery are built and maintained according to the standards required for their class. Classification surveyors often have two roles: one is as a representative of the classification society; and the other as an inspector on behalf of the country with which the vessel is registered (the flag state). The classification role is to ensure that during construction the vessel initially complies with the classification society's rules for construction and outfitting, and thereafter is maintained fit to proceed trading. The Flag State role is based on a clear set of guidelines issued by the registering country. On satisfactory completion of any survey, the classification surveyor makes recommendations to the classification society and/or the flag state. These may be that the vessel has a clean bill of health, or that various defects must be corrected within a given time.
  • 17. The class society can withdraw the class certificate of the ship. As a valid class certificate is mandatory by SOLAS, the class has inform the Flag State and Port State as soon as the class certificate is withdrawn. If the class certificate is withdrawn, then the Safety Construction Certificate become invalid as well. SOLAS declares the Class Society as mandatory. Although the classification societies started in 1760 with captains who will examine a ship, more specialization came and now there are in principle there three kind of surveyors, ex-navigational, ex-mechanical / electrical and naval architects. In most cases you will find the navigational inspectors as the flag state inspectors and auditors. The classification society uses the mechanical / electrical inspectors. They will start in the engine room and will learn the hull part in their inspection career. The hull surveyors are in a perfect world only naval architects. The auditors in the classification society can have navigational background but normally the surveyor with experience will become auditor. Although you will think that every class surveyor is entitled to inspect everything, this is however not the case.
  • 18.
  • 19.
  • 20. AIM independent marine surveyor AIM independent marine surveyor may be asked to carry out a wide range of tasks, including examining ships' cargoes or onboard conditions such as fuel quality; investigating accidents at sea (e.g., oil spillages or failure of machinery or structures which are not considered to be critical); and preparing accident reports for insurance purposes, and conducting draught surveys to analyse how much cargo has been lost or gained. AIM independent marine surveyors also carry out condition surveys or pre-purchase surveys to determine the condition of the ship prior to charter or an acquisition. Many companies as P&I clubs, ship-owners, brokers, etc. employ or contract the services of a private marine surveyor in order to determine the condition of the ship. Association of certified marine surveyors:  National Association of Marine Surveyors  Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors  Navtech Marine Surveyor Education US Surveyors Association  Vessel safety survey  Association of Certified Marine Surveyors
  • 21.
  • 22. The different roles of Maritime Inspectors, Surveyors and Auditors Maritime inspectors come in different roles, names and they work for different organizations. Depending on their title, the role can more or less be distinguished. In short the maritime inspector works normally as third party, as vetting or for an insurance company. Flag State Maritime Inspectors The certificates from the Flag State are : 1. Safety Equipment 2. Safety Construction 3. Safety Radio 4. MARPOL (annex I till VI) 5. Load Line 6. ISM 7. ISPS 8. MLC Nowadays more and more administrations outsource the inspection to recognized classification societies. The surveyors of the class society have the same rights and obligations as the Flag State inspector only when the surveyor finds deficiencies, the class has also to inform the Flag State. In case a certificate is withdrawn both the Port State as the Flag State has to be informed. This outsourcing process from the Flag State to the recognized class society is controlled by auditors from the flag state and is described by SOLAS.
  • 23. Another possibility is that the Flag State will only inspect one of more certificates and leave the rest to the recognized classification society. In this case the Flag State still got a first-hand impression on the vessel while some technical inspections are done by the class. ISM and ISPS Auditors The auditor evaluates a system by taken sample points. In this case the ISM and ISPS audits on board of a ship and in the office. This topic belongs to SOLAS and therefore to the administration, but like other inspections this is often outsourced to any recognized classification society. This means that the class surveyor and the auditors can be from different recognized organizations. This will bring us to the auditors from the administration and region. As soon as you outsource specific products you need to establish a control on these products. In this case the products are inspections and audits. This means that the quality system of the recognized classification society has to be evaluated by the Flag State auditors or region auditors. The qualification system of a recognized classification society can be from IACS or an ISO 9001. This means that IACS auditor, the 9001 auditor, the flag state auditor and the region auditor like EU auditor will visit the headquarters of the class society and some satellite offices. The advantages are that with more auditors from different kind of samples will be taken and evaluated. Although this looks like a painful process, the result is that the quality system of the recognized classification society becomes better and better.
  • 24. MLC inspectors The MLC inspector is new in the field. The convention belongs to the ILO and is organised by the IMO, so the certificate belongs to the administration. Most of the times MLC inspector will be a surveyor and/or auditor from any recognized class society. So the owner is free in his choice if the Flag outsource this part to a recognized organization. Port Sate Control Office The IMO released a resolution A.1052(27) with guidelines for the behavior of the port state control officer. Also the reasons for detentions are given In this resolution. In general the port state officer will have limited time to inspect a vessel. So if they have several ships in one day, the inspection will be focused on the certificates with a small round. Class societies like to help their clients with keeping track of the reasons of detentions and publishing these on their websites. Although a port state officer has limited time, he can always cancel another vessel from his schedule when the first few impressions are below standard. First impression is the general look of the ship from outside, second impression is the gangway, third impression is the behavior of the man at the gangway, fourth impressions is the walk over deck to the accommodation, fifth impression is the walk through the accommodation to the bridge, the office or to the master’s cabin. Here the impressions will continue with the behavior of the master and the organisation of the paper work. So the first 5 impressions will tell the port state officer a lot about his time schedule. The port state officer can detain a vessel and has the authority to request a flag state and/or the recognized class society to carry out inspections according a specific certificate on the vessel. In this case the flag state is authorized to visit the ship, only the class society has to wait till the
  • 25. management of the ship also invites them to the ship, as they are the class society’s client. After the inspection of the flag the port state will visit the ship again for a re-inspection before the port state will release the ship. For tankers above 10 years there is a rule that they have to request also for an extensive port state inspection. Tankers in general have also more extensive inspections by class and flag state. Besides this they can expect the inspections by the vetting inspectors of the owners of the cargo. Vetting inspectors follows the rules and regulations of the cargo owner. Other Maritime Inspectors Other maritime inspectors are working for a underwriter or for a oil/chemical or gas company. So in general other inspectors work for a company and the don’t deal with the certification but with the money. The underwriter works for a small company and will only be seen if damage repair is expensive enough. The owner will invite him and the surveyor will be tracking the finance of the repairs and is trying to find the cause of the damage. The vetting inspector can work directly for an oil company or can be hired by an oil company. Vetting is looking at the background before giving a contract. For the management of the tankers which are not owned by the oil companies, this vetting is important as it means that they will get the charter or not. So in this case even more money is at stake. Third Party Maritime Inspectors: Third Party Maritime Inspectors can be ordered by the ships management when a technical report is needed. This can be at the beginning of a charter, but often during the sale of a ship a third party is invited.
  • 26. Other inspectors can be seen at the end of beginning of a charter. For example the amount of fuel has to be determined. So with normal book keeping of fuel and lubricating oil consumption, much money will be on stake. Still other inspectors, like quarantine, police and customs will visit the ship but these belongs to the daily business of any kind of travelling. Kind regards, Dr Capt. Nguyen Te Nhan / G.D Agriculture - Industry - Marine Survey & Inspection Group ------------------------------------------------------- Tel : +84-8-3832-7204 Fax : +84-8-3832-8393 Cell. : +84903615612 E-mail: aimcontrol@aimcontrolgroup.com inspection@aimcontrolgroup.com MSN : aimcontrol@hotmail.com Skype: aimcontrol http://www.aimcontrolgroup.com ------------------------------------------------------
  • 27. Contact: For further information, please contact: Dr Capt. Nguyen Te Nhan, General Director Agriculture – Industry – Marine Control Inspection Group (AIM Control) Tel/Fax: +84 8 38327204 / +84 8 38328393 E-mail: aimcontrol@aimcontrolgroup.com Or visit our website at: www.aimcontrolgroup.com