Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Y8 in danger v ad 2

1,962 views

Published on

Environment in Danger
English Teaching
Key Stage 3

Published in: Education
  • Unlock Her Legs is your passage way to a life full of loving and sex... read more ... ●●● http://t.cn/AiurDrZp
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Download The Complete Lean Belly Breakthrough Program with Special Discount. ♣♣♣ https://tinyurl.com/bkfitness4u
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Want to preview some of our plans? You can get 50 Woodworking Plans and a 440-Page "The Art of Woodworking" Book... Absolutely FREE ■■■ http://tinyurl.com/y3hc8gpw
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Want to preview some of our plans? You can get 50 Woodworking Plans and a 440-Page "The Art of Woodworking" Book... Absolutely FREE ◆◆◆ http://ishbv.com/tedsplans/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Doctor's 2-Minute Ritual For Shocking Daily Belly Fat Loss! Watch This Video ■■■ https://tinyurl.com/bkfitness4u
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

Y8 in danger v ad 2

  1. 1. VAD
  2. 2. LO: Explore how writers communicate their ideas and perspectives Task 1: What do you think when you see this? What adjectives could you use to describe it? Can you guess what the lesson may be about? VAD
  3. 3. Any ideas what the lesson may be about now? VAD
  4. 4. You must have got it by now? VAD
  5. 5. LO: Explore how writers communicate their ideas and perspectives Some of the images are shocking – be prepared. DO NOT watch it all the way to the end!!!!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpXA1OT3gRk What is your view on killing animals for fur? VAD
  6. 6. This is Twiggy: the first ‘supermodel’ from the 1960’s. She still models today and is a regular on your TV sets,, advertising Marks and Spencer’s clothing.model form the 1960’s. She advertises clothes for Marks and Spencers now. VAD Why might she be connected with the previous images?
  7. 7. Build: Task 2 a) As a class, let’s look at the picture of Twiggy Lawson and Jasmine the Alsatian. What are your first impressions? What is the advert about? b) What is the purpose of the advert? c) Who is the audience and give some reasons. d) Where would be the best place to have this advert published? Is this an effective media? Is Twiggy an effective selling technique? VAD
  8. 8. a)Look at the ‘Animal Aid’ leaflet. What are your first impressions? b)What is the poster about? How does the logo help you work it out? c)What is the purpose of the leaflet? Are farm animals as important as ‘endangered ‘ animals? d)Who is the audience and how do you know? e)Where could the leaflet published for maximum effect? VAD Task 3 Look carefully at the logo. If not for this, it wouldn’t be apparent what the advert is for. How is the logo effective? What literary technique does the name use?
  9. 9. Task 4: Can you link any words / ideas together and write out 5 points comparing and contrasting. For example: 1) Both texts are concerned with the treatment of animals. VAD However, On the other hand, On the contrary, In opposition to, This differs from, The other advert, Likewise, Similarly, Alternatively, In the same way, But Unlike Instead whereas
  10. 10. Create your own advert for animals which demonstrates some of the techniques we have studied so far this year. Peer assess. Emotive language Logo Rhetorical questions triplets Personal colours pronouns Statistics VAD Modals Imperatives
  11. 11. VAD
  12. 12. LO: Create an extended metaphor of your life VAD
  13. 13. Task 1) Read the following poem extracts and write down your guess what the theme of the poem is. In Praise of Ironing It has to be loved the way a laundress loves her linens, the way she moves her hands caressing the fine muslins knowing their warp and woof, VAD
  14. 14. It has to be loved as if it were embroidered with flowers and birds and two joined hearts upon it. It has to be stretched and stroked. It has to be celebrated. VAD
  15. 15. Archangels then will attend to its metals and polish the rods of its rain. Seraphim will stop singing hosannas to shower it with blessings and blisses and praises and, newly in love, we must draw it and paint it, our pencils and brushes and loving caresses smoothing the holy surfaces. VAD
  16. 16. In Praise of Ironing It has to be loved the way a laundress loves her linens, the way she moves her hands caressing the fine muslins knowing their warp and woof, like a lover coaxing, or a mother praising. It has to be loved as if it were embroidered with flowers and birds and two joined hearts upon it. It has to be stretched and stroked. It has to be celebrated. O this great beloved world and all the creatures in it. It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet. The trees must be washed, and the grasses and mosses. They have to be polished as if made of green brass. The rivers and little streams with their hidden cresses and pale-coloured pebbles and their fool’s gold must be washed and starched or shined into brightness, the sheets of lake water smoothed with the hand and the foam of the oceans pressed into neatness. It has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness and pleated and goffered, the flower-blue sea, the protean, wine-dark, grey, green sea with its metres of satin and bolts of brocade. And sky- such an O! overhead- night and day must be burnished and rubbed by hands that are loving so the blue blazons forth and the stars keep on shining within and above and the hands keep on moving. It has to be made bright, the skin of this planet, till it shines in the sun like gold leaf. Archangels then will attend to its metals and polish the rods of its rain. Seraphim will stop singing hosannas to shower it with blessings and blisses and praises and, newly in love, we must draw it and paint it, our pencils and brushes and loving caresses smoothing the holy surfaces. Pablo Neruda Alpha pathway http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrTsZmxFC5I VAD
  17. 17. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrTsZmxFC5I beta pathway In praise of ironing It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet, has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness; the sheets have to be embroidered, with trees and flowers, with love. It has to be Washed with care And dried in the scent of spring flowers. VAD Remember , a metaphor is a direct comparison without ‘as’ or ‘like’. You are going to produce a short poem which uses an extended metaphor. You are going to produce your own extended metaphor poem about your life.
  18. 18. The poem is what we call an extended metaphor, where we compare something to something else ( but don’t use ‘like’ or ‘as’) with a theme that goes on for a while (extended). The poet has used a mix of ordinary and extraordinary images to tell us how important the world is to her. The whole poem starts with laundry and ends with angels! Task 2) Explain how the poem is an ‘extended metaphor.’ What does it compare the Earth to and how does it ‘extend’ , (continue with) imagery connected to this main idea? VAD
  19. 19. You are going to develop and your idea into a poem e.g. I think life is a box of chocolates A baby born is the excitement of the present… VAD I think life is a computer game… I think life is a football game… I think life is a flower.. Careful NOT to use LIKE or AS Use the graphical organiser on the next slide to help you.
  20. 20. Task 3) Produce a Venn Diagram to help you. Choose a idea and plan it out like the following e.g. VAD Extended Metaphor Explain your theme Pacman is a computer game where you have you eat as many power pellets as possible, and avoid the ghosts chasing you. The chase = pursuit of knowledge Power pellets = knowledge Ghosts = the obstacles in your school life Success = conquering your demons, the ghosts Life is similar-how? Life can be compared to a computer game because there are obstacles to overcome
  21. 21. VAD Extended Metaphor Theme = Life is similar - how? e.g. Life is like a football game where you need fitness, endurance… Rules Goals Obstacles success
  22. 22. Life Life is a box of crayons Full of variety and colour Filled with exciting choices but also dull, grey moments. You decide what goes into your finished picture. When it is time to leave the picture you made, It remains with your loved ones. VAD
  23. 23. Present your ideas back to the class VAD
  24. 24. VAD
  25. 25. LO: Exploring how a poet uses language to present a viewpoint VAD
  26. 26. Commas Commas are used to : • Separate items in a list : My favourite sports are football, basketball, swimming and athletics. • To separate a main clause from a subordinate clause (s) in complex sentences when the subordinate clause appears before or in the middle of a main clause : Quickly to avoid the snarling dog, Becky jumped over the wall. The fierce dog, who had escaped its leash, came tearing after her. • To introduce direct speech and replace the full stop at the end of a spoken sentence: He said, “Hello.” • “Don’t talk to me,” replied Becky. • To attach a question tag to a statement : You do understand, don’t you?” Put the missing commas in each of the sentences below. 1. The hedgehog which is about 30 centimetres long has prickly spines. 2. Have you seen my new pet rat Stinky? 3. In the middle of the night our dog started to bark. 4. I saw two animals a deer and an elk in the woods. 5. Can I have a pet rabbit Dad? 6. The most popular breeds of dog in the UK are the labrador the cocker spaniel the German shepherd the Staffordshire bull terrier and the boxer. VAD
  27. 27. LO: Exploring how a poet uses language to present a viewpoint THE JAGUAR by Ted Hughes Jaguars are the biggest wild cats in the Western Hemisphere. They are hunted for their beautiful fur, and are dying out as their habitat is destroyed by pollution. The following is a jaguar born in captivity but , like the foxes at the fur farm, it is still pacing its cage; a sure sign it is bored and wants to run free. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE9YcdCl7H4
  28. 28. The apes yawn and adore their fleas in the sun. The parrots shriek as if they were on fire, or strut Like cheap tarts to attract the stroller with the nut. Fatigued with indolence, tiger and lion Lie still as the sun. The boa-constrictor’s coil Is a fossil. Cage after cage seems empty, or Stinks of sleepers from the breathing straw. It might be painted on a nursery wall. Task 1 Write out 3 similes. Write out a metaphor.
  29. 29. But who runs like the rest past these arrives At a cage where the crowd stands, stares, mesmerized, As a child at a dream, at a jaguar hurrying enraged Through prison darkness after the drills of his eyes On a short fierce fuse. Not in boredom— The eye satisfied to be blind in fire, By the bang of blood in the brain deaf the ear— He spins from the bars, but there’s no cage to him Task 2: Write 5 examples of the negative words/ phrases which show how the jaguar feels about his imprisonment. Task 3: Find examples of alliteration. How does this emphasize the blood pounding in the jaguar’s enraged body? Explain it in a PEE statement. The poet uses the alliteration ‘______’ to create a rhythm to show the blood pounding in the jaguar’s enraged body.
  30. 30. More than to the visionary his cell: His stride is wildernesses of freedom: The world rolls under the long thrust of his heel. Over the cage floor the horizons come. A visionary is often a mystical figure who can see the future. What is the only future the jaguar wants to see?
  31. 31. VAD The apes yawn and adore their fleas in the sun. The parrots shriek as if they were on fire, or strut Like cheap tarts to attract the stroller with the nut. Fatigued with indolence, tiger and lion Lie still as the sun. The boa-constrictor’s coil Is a fossil. Cage after cage seems empty, or Stinks of sleepers from the breathing straw. It might be painted on a nursery wall. But who runs like the rest past these arrives At a cage where the crowd stands, stares, mesmerized, As a child at a dream, at a jaguar hurrying enraged Through prison darkness after the drills of his eyes On a short fierce fuse. Not in boredom— The eye satisfied to be blind in fire, By the bang of blood in the brain deaf the ear— He spins from the bars, but there’s no cage to him More than to the visionary his cell: His stride is wildernesses of freedom: The world rolls under the long thrust of his heel. Over the cage floor the horizons come. Task 4 Explain how this poet makes you feel a mixture of admiration for this proud creature, and pity for its situation, using PEE statements. a) The poet uses negative words like ‘_______’so the reader feels sorry for the jaguar. These make you feel… B) Another technique he uses is alliteration ‘_____’ to show… c) He also compares the jaguar to…
  32. 32. “The conditions in the zoo are appalling” Reviewed November 30, 2012 While the animals at the zoo have plenty of room to roam, the facilities are run down, dirty and very old-fashioned. The animals don’t look that well cared for. They are all a bit flea bitten and nothing like zoos in Britain. To be honest, it’s so hot and dusty, I wouldn’t take kids here for an extended period of time. Seeing alligators covered in garbage is pretty terrible. Cages weren’t very clean and water facilities were limited. The animals could certainly do with a lot more shade and plants and water features to play around in. VAD From Trip Advisor Write your own review for trip advisor as if you were the poet, Ted Hughes, about a visit to Riyadh Zoo. Make sure you write about: - The condition of the animals - Cages/ pens - Food available for the animals - Suitability for families
  33. 33. • Share with class. Discuss which review would be the most helpful to a tourist , wishing to visit somewhere with children. Discuss why. VAD
  34. 34. 1. Look at the first two verses. How can you tell that the VAD animals are bored? 2. Look at the third verse onwards. How is the Jaguar different from the other animals in the zoo? 3. Write a short paragraph describing what the writer admires about the jaguar 4. Look at the images below. Choose five and write down the picture you think the writer is trying to create. Write it like this: “image (b) makes the parrots seem like …” The apes yawn and adore their fleas in the sun. The parrots shriek as if they were on fire, or strut Like cheap tarts to attract the stroller with the nut. Fatigued with indolence, tiger and lion Lie still as the sun. The boa-constrictor’s coil Is a fossil. Cage after cage seems empty, or Stinks of sleepers from the breathing straw. It might be painted on a nursery wall. But who runs like the rest past these arrives At a cage where the crowd stands, stares, mesmerized, As a child at a dream, at a jaguar hurrying enraged Through prison darkness after the drills of his eyes On a short fierce fuse. Not in boredom— The eye satisfied to be blind in fire, By the bang of blood in the brain deaf the ear— He spins from the bars, but there’s no cage to him More than to the visionary his cell: His stride is wildernesses of freedom: The world rolls under the long thrust of his heel. Over the cage floor the horizons come. a) shriek as if they were on fire b) strut like cheap tarts c) coil is a fossil d) breathing straw e) it might be painted on a nursery wall f) as a child at a dream g) hurrying enraged through prison darkness h) on a short fierce fuse i) there's no cage to him / j) More than to the visionary his cell k) His stride is wildernesses of freedom l) The world rolls under the long thrust of his heel m) Over the cage floor the horizons come Beta pathway
  35. 35. VAD
  36. 36. LO: Analysing poetry techniques in a pre- 20thcentury poem VAD
  37. 37. He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring’d with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. Task 1)Produce a quick sketch of each line Task 2) What do you think the poem is about? Task 3) Write a sentence to explain and the reasons why. Feed back to the class.
  38. 38. He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring’d with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And VAD like a thunderbolt he falls. Watch the following interpretation of the poem. Was it what you expected ? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-mTNkXUFlg Task 4) Give your OWN title to the poem. (See if you can come up with a metaphor).
  39. 39. The American Bald Eagle is a success story for surviving! It is the symbol for the USA yet was put on the Endangered Species list in 1978. Luckily, it has been protected and was removed from the Endangered Species list in 1995. For now.
  40. 40. Task 5 ) What technique is being used here? He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring’d with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. The poet seems to be suggesting the eagle is a ‘god-like’ figure, looking down on everything from the sun. Task 6) Explain how this word makes you feel. Why might the poet have used it. Can you come up with an alternative synonym (word with a similar meaning)? Task 7 Azure is a word associated with royal seals and coats of arms . (Think back to the American seal). What might this suggest about how the poet views the eagle? How do other cultures around the world view the eagle?
  41. 41. He clasps the crag with crooked hands; VAD Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring’d with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. Task 8 What technique is used when you compare a thing to a person or something alive? This is a picture of Zeus, king of the Greek gods. Only he can use a thunderbolt as a weapon. What does this suggest about the eagle? Think about a previous image in the poem. Why does the poet imply the eagle ‘owns’ the crag?
  42. 42. A Rhyme Scheme is the pattern of sounds at the end of lines. Each sound pattern uses a letter of the alphabet and you begin with ‘A’. Jack and Jill A Went up the hill A To fetch a pail of water B Jack fell down C And broke his crown C And Jill came tumbling D After B VAD
  43. 43. What is the Rhyme Scheme of this poem? He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring’d with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. Th
  44. 44. VAD The Prisoner The prisoner’s pacing path is stomped strides smooth His fur is sunlight dappled darkness Write your own poem about a powerful predator. Give it a metaphor title which could explain something about its strength or speed. Make sure you try and use some: • Similes • Metaphors • Alliteration • Symbolism (thunderbolt for god etc) • Rhymes if possible (not essential) Write it in the middle of the page and put labels on to show all the techniques you used. Metaphor alliteration metaphor
  45. 45. Peer assess Can your peer guess what your poem is about? Which predator is it and why? How many techniques have they used? VAD
  46. 46. VAD
  47. 47. LO: Working effectively in a group to produce a charity presentation on ‘Endangered Animals’ In your tables , decide which people are going to do the following. You need: Project manager – write the ‘mission statement’ : the main idea of what your charity is all about; it’s aims; ideas. Makes overall decisions and delivers the idea. (Needs to be a good speaker and organiser). Art designer – designs the logo, cartoon animals , comic script tv ad idea Researcher – Researches charities already out there and report back, finds out the details about animals Marketing Analyst – look at other websites, charities, and decides how to promote your charity e.g. TV ad idea? magazine ideas? TV schedule? Fun runs? Get schools involved? 1) Which animals you are going to research (must be endangered) 2) Who is going to research what? 3) What marketing strategies are you going to use? 4) Where will you advertise? 5) Research existing sites. 6) How are youi going to be different to charities already out there? 7) How are you going to persuade people to give money? 8) What will you get them to do? Text to pay? Sponsor? Go into schools to tell them? VAD The next lesson will tell you more about how you are going to deliver your ideas in a presentation.
  48. 48. Has your group produced the following? • Sponsorship pack ( what do you get if you sponsor an animal? Info? Keyrings? etc) • Storyboard for a tv advert • Script for a radio advert • Promotion pack to schools for money raising activities (e.g. ‘Fun Run’) • Fact file on at least 3 endangered animals • Website design VAD
  49. 49. VAD
  50. 50. LO: Identify and create an effective speech • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tbPCYctoeU This is the former President of the United States , illustrating how NOT to deliver a speech! So what does make a good speech? VAD
  51. 51. When do you give a speech? VAD In court Press release Grand opening of a hospital, etc
  52. 52. Task 1: Add to the spidergram and think of all the important times in life you need to use speeches or you have seen them used on television. The type of speech Explain importance Funeral Press statement So you’ve thought about where and why we make speeches. Now you need to review the terminology to analyse them. VAD
  53. 53. Task 2: What makes a good speech? Watch the video where a 12 year old girl presented her speech to world leaders in 1992, and made headlines all over the world. Write a sentence to explain why you think people around the world were so impressed by this speech? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPx5r35Aymc VAD
  54. 54. GO THROUGH A FOREST
  55. 55. A ALLITERATION - she sells seashells F FACTS - It’s 2013 O OPINIONS - Y8 is the best year. R REPETITION – No food. No drink. No mess. E EMOTIVE LANGUAGE – starving children S STATISTICS – 60% of children, … T THREE – sun, sand and surf holiday
  56. 56. Hello, I’m Severn Suzuki speaking for E.C.O. – The Environmental Children’s Organisation. We are a group of twelve and thirteen-year-olds from Canada trying to make a difference: Vanessa Suttie, Morgan Geisler, Michelle Quigg and me. We raised all the money ourselves to come five thousand miles to tell you adults you must change your ways. Coming here today, I have no hidden agenda. I am fighting for my future. Losing my future is not like losing an election or a few points on the stock market. I am here to speak for all generations to come. I am here to speak on behalf of the starving children around the world whose cries go unheard. Task 3: a) Write down any examples of ‘emotive language’ above. VAD
  57. 57. I am here to speak for the countless animals dying across this planet because they have nowhere left to go. We cannot afford to be not heard. I am afraid to go out in the sun now because of the holes in the ozone. I am afraid to breathe the air because I don’t know what chemicals are in it. b) Write out an examples of repetition I used to go fishing in Vancouver with my dad until just a few years ago we found the fish full of cancers. And now we hear about animals and plants going extinct every day — vanishing forever. In my life, I have dreamt of seeing the great herds of wild animals, jungles and rainforests full of birds and butterflies, but now I wonder if they will even exist for my children to see. Did you have to worry about these little things when you were my age? c) Write out a triplet ‘list of three’. d) Write out a rhetorical question. All this is happening before our eyes and yet we act as if we have all the time we want and all the solutions. I’m only a child and I don’t have all the solutions, but I want you to realise, neither do you! e) Write out the personal pronoun/direct address to the audience * You don’t know how to fix the holes in our ozone layer. * You don’t know how to bring salmon back up a dead stream. * You don’t know how to bring back an animal now extinct. * And you can’t bring back forests that once grew where there is now desert. If you don’t know how to fix it, please stop breaking it! VAD
  58. 58. Use an ACRONYM to help you plan your ideas. An acronym use the first letters of a word. We are going to use MIC got lost in A FOREST. Can you guess what the acronym letters stand for. VAD M I C A F O R E S T
  59. 59. VAD Modal (words which show how likely you are to do something e.g. should , might, could) Imperative (commands someone imperial would us) e.g. Stop! Conditional (something which relies on a set of conditions e.g. If you want to save_____, you must____
  60. 60. Make up your own persuasive statements about saving the world using A FOREST techniques VAD Alliteration Facts Opinions Rhetorical Question Emotive Language Statistics Triplets
  61. 61. Use the A FOREST to write some phrases suitable for a speech on global warming or endangered animals. Swap and peer asses. Extension Write a speech to present back to the class. Try and make it last at least 2 minutes. VAD
  62. 62. VAD
  63. 63. LO: Appreciate the appeal of writers from our literary heritage http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jx5HCXlECuo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z-uO5TPQfM Pig VAD Task a) Write down some adjectives or phrases to describe a pig. (NOTHING rude or personal) Task b) The words on the next slide, and the youtube clip, are to do with a poem written by Ted Hughes. Predict what it is going to be about http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BAZfXW4GrA
  64. 64. a) Dead h) Graves p) Not pathetic VAD b) Pink white eyelashes i) A poundage of lard and pork q) Greased piglet c) Thick pink bulk j) Trouble of cutting it up r) Squeal d) scald k) Scour it like a doorstep s) Hot blood e) Dignity ... entirely gone l) Weighed ... as much as three men t) Bite f) Sack of wheat m) Faster and nimbler than a cat u) Chop e) Thumped it n) Gash in its throat g) Guilty o) Shocking Task c: What do you think the poem is going to be about now? Write a pee statement , using one of the quotes as evidence of what you think it will show.
  65. 65. VAD http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYAdCeYkypE&list=PLBCAF3D7D6E15BBEE The pig lay on a barrow dead. It weighed, they said, as much as three men. Its eyes closed, pink white eyelashes. Its trotters stuck straight out. Such weight and thick pink bulk Set in death seemed not just dead. It was less than lifeless, further off. It was like a sack of wheat. I thumped it without feeling remorse. One feels guilty insulting the dead, Walking on graves. But this pig Did not seem able to accuse. It was too dead. Just so much A poundage of lard and pork. Its last dignity had entirely gone. It was not a figure of fun. Too dead now to pity. To remember its life, din, stronghold Of earthly pleasure, as it had been, Seemed a false effort, and off the point. Too deadly factual. Its weight Oppressed me – how could it be moved? And the trouble of cutting it up! The gash in its throat was shocking, but not pathetic. Once I ran at a fair in the noise To catch a greased piglet That was faster and nimbler than a cat, Its squeal was the rending of metal. Pigs must have hot blood, they feel like ovens. Their bite is worse than a horse’s – They chop a half-moon clean out. They eat cinders, dead cats. Distinctions and admirations such As this one was long finished with. I stared at it a long time. They were going to scald it, Scald it and scour it like a doorstep ‘View of a Pig’ by Ted Hughs
  66. 66. Task d) Put the following into a double page spread and fill it in. Words and phrases used to describe The writer says… My response… Weight & size colours Pink and white Associated pink with femininity, love VAD White is innocence similes Violent words Life of the pig Death of the pig Words you usually associate with pigs Movement of the pig Actions of the pig Poet’s feelings about pig
  67. 67. Task d) Put the following into a double page spread and fill it in. Words and phrases used to describe The writer says… My response… Weight & size Weighs as much as ‘three men’ Shock that it’s so heavy colours Pink and white Associated pink with femininity, love VAD White is innocence similes Like a sack of wheat Was totally lifeless and heavy Violent words Gash, chop, Makes you think about the act of chopping it up Life of the pig Din, stronghold of earthly pleasure It was noisy and had a pleasurable life Death of the pig Gash in its throat was shocking Makes you feel repulsed by violence Words you usually associate with Pink, cute , fat This description is only negative pigs Movement of the pig Actions of the pig Poet’s feelings about pig
  68. 68. Write out a PEE statement paragraph which explains: How does the writer use language to make you feel sorry for the pig? Share with the class. VAD
  69. 69. VAD
  70. 70. VAD
  71. 71. LO: Create a themed poem which uses parts of speech
  72. 72. How things are done, the ADVERBS tell, As quickly, slowly, badly, well; The PREPOSITION shows relation, As in the street, or at the station; CONJUNCTIONS join, in many ways, Sentences, words, or phrase and phrase; The INTERJECTION cries out, 'Hark! I need an exclamation mark!' Through Poetry, we learn how each of these make up THE PARTS OF SPEECH. VAD The Parts of Speech Every name is called a NOUN, As field and fountain, street and town; In place of noun the PRONOUN stands As he and she can clap their hands; The ADJECTIVE describes a thing, As magic wand and bridal ring; The VERB means action, something done - To read, to write, to jump, to run;
  73. 73. VAD They shut the road through the woods Seventy years ago. Weather and rain have undone it again, And now you would never know There was once a road through the woods Before they planted the trees. It is underneath the coppice and heath And the thin anemones. Only the keeper sees That, where the ring-dove broods, And the badgers roll at ease, There was once a road through the woods. Yet, if you enter the woods Of a summer evening late, When the night-air cools on the trout-ringed pools Where the otter whistles his mate, (They fear not men in the woods, Because they see so few.) You will hear the beat of a horse's feet, And the swish of a skirt in the dew, Steadily cantering through The misty solitudes, As though they perfectly knew The old lost road through the woods ... But there is no road through the woods. Questions 1. Find examples of the following in the woods: 5 Nouns - 1 preposition 5 Verbs - 1 adverb 2. What is the effect of the phrase ‘misty solitudes’ in the second verse. What kind of atmosphere does it suggest? 3. Find 2 eg’s of internal rhyme in the second stanza. 4. How does the poet suggest that, although ‘you would never know/ There was once a road through the woods,’ the road has not completely disappeared ? 5. Which 2 lines in the first verse create an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity and how does the poet use alliteration to create this effect? 6. Describe the atmosphere of the second stanza. Which words create this effect?
  74. 74. Activity •Create a poem using different parts of speech. Remember the poem has to be about nature. Task a) Nouns Write out at least 20 nature nouns. Try to use interesting vocabulary like ‘crag’ e.g. forest Task B) Verbs Write out at least 20 verbs. Try to make them interesting. ruminates daydreams muses Task C) Adverbs Write out a list of at least 10 adverbs Slowly Quickly Task D) Prepositions Write out a list of at least 10 prepositions e.g. On Above
  75. 75. Example stone listens carefully around • Then expand your words into a sentence. The stone listens carefully to the grass as it grows around it. • Continue this process to form your poem. • Write your poem up. It must have at least 10 lines and be on the theme of nature. • Create a poster for your poem.
  76. 76. VAD Plenary Swap your poem poster with a peer and get them to identify all the parts of speech that they can find. Extension Create you own acronym (like A forest), poem or sentence which is an ‘aide memoire’ (a memory aid) e.g. Big Elephants Can Always Understand Small Elephants Create a poster for it.
  77. 77. VAD
  78. 78. LO: Creating description using poetic techniques and ambitious vocabulary VAD A comparison which uses like or as A direct comparison where something ‘is’ something else Repetition of initial letters Sound words Where something which isn’t alive is described as if it is alive (like a person or animal) Alliteration Onomatopoeia Personification simile metaphor A B C D E
  79. 79. VAD Identify : • Similes • Metaphors • Personification • Onomatopoeia • Alliteration 1. short spells of sharp, glittering sunshine 2. a timid rainbow flirts with storm clouds 3. the old house on the hill wore its steep, gabled roof pulled over its ears like a low hat 4. lightening cracked like gunfire 5. stainless steel cranes silhouetted against the sapphire stained sky 6. the rumble and grumble of the angry storm 7. rain splintered down 8. rubbish flapped around like an angry bird 9. brutal black clouds crowd out the light 10. the crash and thrash of lightening splitting into silver sparks 11. battered broken down buildings buckle under the assault 12. leaves flitted fearfully by
  80. 80. Read the poem Wind by Ted Hughes. Find some examples of the techniques you’re looked at. Descriptive writing can use a lot of what we would ordinarily think of as poetic techniques VAD This house has been far out at sea all night, The woods crashing through darkness, the booming hills, Winds stampeding the fields under the window Floundering black astride and blinding wet Till day rose; then under an orange sky The hills had new places, and wind wielded Blade-light, luminous black and emerald, Flexing like the lens of a mad eye. At noon I scaled along the house-side as far as The coal-house door. Once I looked up - Through the brunt wind that dented the balls of my eyes The tent of the hills drummed and strained its guyrope, The fields quivering, the skyline a grimace, At any second to bang and vanish with a flap; The wind flung a magpie away and a black- Back gull bent like an iron bar slowly. The house Rang like some fine green goblet in the note That any second would shatter it. Now deep In chairs, in front of the great fire, we grip Our hearts and cannot entertain book, thought, Or each other. We watch the fire blazing, And feel the roots of the house move, but sit on, Seeing the window tremble to come in, Hearing the stones cry out under the horizons. • Similes • Metaphors • Personification • Onomatopoeia • Alliteration
  81. 81. Write a description about an old stone cottage on a wind-swept island in the middle of a storm. Use the vocabulary on the next slide. Remember to use poetice techniques The old house creaked in the wind, its roots pulling at the dark earth… The black storm clouds stabbed spears of rain down onto the ancient, stone – cottage… VAD
  82. 82. Create your own poetic description using some of the vocabulary and ideas so far Nouns spark hurricane landscape cascades hammer illumination trees ship wind rage spectre skies thunder grass fingers moon leaves cousin coast tongues places cacophony silhouettes havoc lightning torrents circuit roots clouds scent darkness rooftops pools mood anguish fear puddles VAD graves dagger anarchy fragrancemystery lake earth carnage force velvet electricity Adjectives jagged omnipotent howling ancestral jet-black gold scarlet ebony old heavy crusted frozen magenta fragile metallic amber crimson stainless steel skeletal silky bruised icy stealthily callous dark isolated silver humble tumultuous violet vicious belligerent battered frantic brutal luminous Verbs break violate juxtapose flash magnify bring lay howl gather echo clatter crash slash slither whistle murmur splatter whisper talk sweep tell reap quiver rip terrorise undulate peal seal recoil cackle pulsate whip fall rumble tumble unleash rampage shatter reverberate align follow ride break unchain Adverbs Viciously desperately violently vindictively suddenly avidly Blindly greedily gleefully zestfully
  83. 83. Lo: Create an advert which encourages people to donate to your endangered animals charity VAD http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAnd0ebRVuE Watch the video and identify ‘a forest’ techniques
  84. 84. VAD
  85. 85. Assessment: •I will use peer assessment this lesson. •My teacher will assess my speaking and listening skills and give me advice. •My teacher will mark my work on personification and make comments on ways to improve.
  86. 86. Watch the music video ‘Welcome to the Jungle’ and listen to the lyrics. What is the band trying to say about the city? Welcome to the jungle it gets worse here every day Ya learn to live like an animal in the jungle where we play If you hunger for what you see you'll take it eventually You can have everything you want but you better not take it from me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1tj2zJ2Wvg What’s this video trying to say about the jungle? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cD9cBEaNBc
  87. 87. LO:Understand and create your own personification Personification is where a ‘thing’ is described as if it’s alive e.g. the house glared down (houses can’t see so can’t glare) Welcome to the jungle it gets worse here every day Ya learn to live like an animal in the jungle where we play If you hunger for what you see you'll take it eventually You can have everything you want but you better not take it from me
  88. 88. Personification Personification is a type of metaphor, where objects are described as if they have human or animal qualities. From The Love Song Of J Alfred Prufrock by TS Eliot The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes, The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes, Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening, Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains, Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys, Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap, And seeing that it was a soft October night, Curled once about the house, and fell asleep.
  89. 89. Write down 5 words or phrases to describe a ‘jungle’. Write down 5 words or phrases to describe a ‘city’.
  90. 90. Build: Task b) Look at the following words: cars gargles gutter hunched houses cruise What can you say about them? Some are nouns, some are verbs but what else? When you pair the words they turn into alliteration. What could it mean? Thinking about language Task a) The title of the poem we are going to study is called ‘City Jungle’ . This is an oxymoron. Can you work out what oxymoron may mean? (Oxy means sharp and moron means dull). What is unusual about the words ‘city’ and ‘jungle’? Is there a way you could describe them? Why are they strange together?
  91. 91. Your task is to a) Sketch these images from the Demonstrate: poem. b) Write the appropriate line from the poem underneath b) write your own example of personification for the image. A) E.G. Poem Image - A motorbike snarls My Image - A motorbike coughed and stuttered into life F) E) B) C) D)
  92. 92. 1. alone together 2. awfully good 3. bitter sweet 4. clearly misunderstood 5. crash landing 6. cruel kindness 7. deafening silence 8. freezer burn 9. friendly takeover 10. icy hot 11. impossible solution Famous Shakespeare Oxymorons Damned saint “O brawling love! O loving hate! . . . O heavy lightness! serious vanity! Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health! Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is! This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
  93. 93. The poem also uses other techniques such as: A pun = a play on words Alliteration = she sells sea shells 1.Write out the 1 pun. 2.Write out 2 examples of alliteration. 3. Use 2 of the metaphors in the poem and change them into similes, using ‘as’ or ‘like’. Write your own OXYMORON opposite poem , trying to use personification. e.g. Earth Sky The Earth shakes itself awake It showers in the early morning rain
  94. 94. Peer assessment: Show your work to a partner. Explain what you have done to the images and why you have personified them that way. Your partner will give you feedback on what you have done well and how you may have been able to improve it. I am going to assess your speaking and listening as you do this.
  95. 95. LO: Write a dramatic monologue A dramatic monologue is where only one character speaks and shows us something of their personality. It’s like they are speaking to the reader. The poem we are going to study is the thoughts of a ‘god’ with supernatural powers. VAD
  96. 96. Task 1 a) List the names of as many gods as you can. b) List some adjectives which describe god-like qualities. VAD
  97. 97. VAD Below is a copy of a poem. As you can see, the words and lines have been silhouetted. This has been done in order to force you to respond to the poem visually, to respond to the way that the poem has been structured, on the page. I may be smelly and I may be old, Rough in my pebbles, reedy in my pools, But where my fish float by I bless their swimming And I like the people to bathe in me, especially women. But I can drown the fools Who bathe too close to the weir, contrary to rules. And they take a long time drowning As I throw them up now and then in the spirit of clowning. Hi yih, yippity-yap, merrily I flow, O I may be an old foul river but I have plenty of go. Once there was a lady who was too bold She bathed in me by the tall black cliff where the water runs cold, So I brought her down here To be my beautiful dear. Oh will she stay with me will she stay This beautiful lady, or will she go away? She lies in my beautiful deep river bed with many a weed To hold her, and many a waving reed. Oh who would guess what a beautiful white face lies there Waiting for me to smooth and wash away the fear She looks at me with. Hi yih, do not let her Go. There is no one on earth who does not forget her Now. They say I am a foolish old smelly river But they do not know of my wide original bed Where the lady waits, with her golden sleepy head. If she wishes to go I will not forgive her. Predict what the poem may be about. What is the character ‘god’ of? • What does the line look like? • What might the poem be about? • Why, do you think, the poem is one verse long? • What is the effect of the different line lengths? That is, what do they seem to capture? • What might the pace of the poem be during short lines? Long lines? What might this reflect? • What might the title of the poem be?
  98. 98. VAD Predictions  In pairs, make a list of words and phrases that you associate with rivers and water. Keep this list safe. Think about: • possible adjectives to describe a river / water; • words to describe the movement of a river / water; • what might happen in a river / water; • who and what you might find in a river / water. Character and voice  Read the following lines from the opening of the poem: “I may be smelly and I may be old, Rough in my pebbles, reedy in my pools, But where my fish float by I bless their swimming And I like the people to bathe in me, especially women.”  Who is the speaker of this poem? Explain your answer. The River God  The title of the poem is ‘The River God’. Listen to and then read a copy of the poem. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGB0KjZ8EF8 The poem is dominated by a word set linked to rivers and water. Work in pairs to make a note of them.  Compare the words from the poem with the list of words and phrases from the prediction activity. How many did you predict correctly?
  99. 99. VAD 5 10 15 20 25 I may be smelly and I may be old, Rough in my pebbles, reedy in my pools, But where my fish float by I bless their swimming And I like the people to bathe in me, especially women. But I can drown the fools Who bathe too close to the weir, contrary to rules. And they take a long time drowning As I throw them up now and then in the spirit of clowning. Hi yih, yippity-yap, merrily I flow, O I may be an old foul river but I have plenty of go. Once there was a lady who was too bold She bathed in me by the tall black cliff where the water runs cold, So I brought her down here To be my beautiful dear. Oh will she stay with me will she stay .
  100. 100. God-like Like the gods you listed earlier, the speaker of this poem – The River God – shows different attitudes and different aspects of his personality at certain points in the poem In small groups, identify examples and evidence from the poem which captures the attitude and VAD personality of the speaker Group 1: Playful and humourous Group 2: Loving and caring Group 3: Selfish, spiteful and powerful Group 4: Lines 11 – 26  In lines 11 – 26 there is plenty of evidence of the above examples of the speaker’s attitude and personality. However, the tone and content in this section of the poem is more complex. Are there any words or phrases that make you feel sympathy for the speaker? Look for contrasts and look at the words the speaker uses to describe himself. (You can look at the entire poem, too.)
  101. 101. Mother Nature VAD Create your own dramatic monologue in poetry or prose. You can be as creative as you like, but it must show something about the Earth in danger. You can create a poster, or even ideas for a costume to wear.
  102. 102. LO: Appreciate how to make a poem come alive with sensual imagery The following poem is all about the excitement of being a child. Make a list of fairy stories you were told as a child. Like the poem we are going to read, fairy stories can have a deeper, and often, darker message. Can you think of the darker side of fairy tales and what they may be warning children about?
  103. 103. Bluebeard is a wealthy aristocrat, feared and shunned because of his ugly, blue beard. He has been married several times, but no one knows what became of his wives. He is therefore avoided by the local girls. When Bluebeard visits one of his neighbours and asks to marry one of her two daughters, the girls are terrified, and each tries to pass him on to the other. Eventually he talks the younger daughter into visiting him, and after hosting a wonderful banquet, he persuades her to marry him. After the ceremony she goes to live with him in his château. Very shortly after, Bluebeard announces that he must leave the country for a while; he gives all the keys of the château to his new wife, telling her they open the doors to rooms which contain his treasures. He tells her to use the keys freely, and enjoy herself whilst he is away. However, he also gives her the key to one small room beneath the castle, stressing to her that she must not enter this room under any circumstances. She vows she will never enter the room. He then goes away and leaves the house in her hands. Immediately she is overcome with the desire to see what the forbidden room holds, and despite warnings from her visiting sister, Anne, the girl abandons her guests during a house party, and takes the key to the room. The wife immediately discovers the room's horrible secret: its floor is awash with blood, and the murdered bodies of her husband's former wives hang from hooks on the walls. Horrified, she drops the key into the pool of blood. She flees the room, but the blood staining the key will not wash off. She reveals her murderous husband's secret to her sister Anne, and both plan to flee the castle the next day. But Bluebeard returns home unexpectedly the next morning, and, noticing the blood on the key, immediately knows his wife has broken her vow. In a blind rage he threatens to behead her on the spot, but she implores him to give her a quarter of an hour to say her prayers. He consents, so she locks herself in the highest tower with Anne. While Bluebeard, sword in hand, tries to break down the door, the sisters wait for their two brothers to arrive. At the last moment, as Bluebeard is about to deliver the fatal blow, the brothers break into the castle, and as he attempts to flee, they kill him. He leaves no heirs but his wife, who inherits all his great fortune. She uses part of it for a dowry to marry off her sister, another part for her brothers' captains' commissions, and the rest to marry a worthy gentleman who makes her forget her horrible encounter with Bluebeard. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2q8QJ5qNUI
  104. 104. Late August, given heavy rain and sun for a full week, the blackberries would ripen. At first, just one, a glossy purple clot among others, red, green, hard as a knot. You ate that first one and its flesh was sweet like thickened wine: summer's blood was in it leaving stains upon the tongue and lust for picking. Then red ones inked up and that hunger sent us out with milk-cans, pea-tins, jam-pots where briars scratched and wet grass bleached our boots. Round hayfields, cornfields and potato-drills we trekked and picked until the cans were full, until the tinkling bottom had been covered with green ones, and on top big dark blobs burned like a plate of eyes. Our hands were peppered with thorn pricks, our palms sticky as Bluebeard's. We hoarded the fresh berries in the byre. But when the bath was filled we found a fur, A rat-grey fungus, glutting on our cache. The juice was stinking too. Once off the bush the fruit fermented, the sweet flesh would turn sour. I always felt like crying. It wasn't fair that all the lovely canfuls smelt of rot. Each year I hoped they'd keep, knew they would not. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGxkRc0rd0o Blackberry Picking by Seamus Heaney
  105. 105. Seamus Heaney – Blackberry-Picking An anecdote is a personal story. This poem is what we call anecdotal. Copy out and explain what happens in each section, paying particular attention to the emotions Part 1 Part 2
  106. 106. 1.The poem is full of colour and many of the colours are used to describe the blackberries themselves. Pick three quotations about the blackberries, copy them out and then explain what impression of the berries we are given. •One of the reasons for the poem’s success is the way in which it vividly creates a sense of the scene through the use of the senses. Record examples of each of the five Sight Sound Smell Taste Touch
  107. 107. As well as writing about a personal memory, a comment is being made about life itself. What do you think is the message / sub-text of the poem? Write your own fairy tale which may be a warning or have a dark side to it
  108. 108. LO: Create your own eco friendly school of the future Eco-schools are running a competition for pupils to design a school for the future. Could you come up with: - List of eco strategies - A revised logo for the school which would reflect its eco- friendly nature - An awe-inspiring ‘green’ design which would show case the school (lots of plants, water, windmills etc) The school could be built over a river, down a hill, the roof could be made of glass, windmills. The choice is yours!!!!
  109. 109. LO: Create your own eco friendly school of the future Eco friendly school of the future for St Thomas As the state-of-the-art new St Thomas Community School nears completion, a number of eco-friendly features have been built in, making it a truly 21st century school. Swansea Council's contractors for the build, Carillion Regional Building has been on site for over a year and has constructed a state of the art, modern building with the environment in mind, which will provide an excellent educational centre for future pupils, but a resource for the whole St Thomas community. The impact of energy inefficiency and CO2 released from using fossil fuels on climate change is well known. The new St Thomas school has a number of green features, including: * Solar panels to provide additional hot water * Photovoltaic panels to provide additional electricity * Rainwater harvesting: rainwater collected off the roof is recycled into the school and used to flush toilets * Passive venting: stacks on the roof provide natural ventilation, reducing the need for air conditioning * Recycled tyres: the playground surfacing is made from recycled tyres and trainers, providing a safe playing surface Swansea Council Cabinet Member for Education, Mike Day said, "All of us by now are aware of our responsibilities to our global environment and future generations, so it is fitting that a facility for local children should be built with sustainability in mind. "Carillion has done a great job and we look forward to seeing it up and running." Gareth Davies, Regional Director at Carillion Regional Building said, "The construction industry has a responsibility to be sustainable, and this was a major consideration when building the new school for the St Thomas area. "The site team would like to thank all the local residents for their support during the build."
  110. 110. LO: Identify and appreciate what makes effective sensual imagery Imagery is a technique using imaginative and descriptive words that stimulate your emotions, imagination or senses. Look at the following ‘image’ • AF7 Select You must appropriate be able and effective to understand vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • You You must should be able be to able understand to use and imagery pick out four in different your own types creative of imagery (writing level 4) (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • • You You could could use use imaginative imaginative and creative and adjectives creative to produce adjectives effective to imagery produce with an effective intentional imagery effect (level (level 5) 6) 5)
  111. 111. Look at the image carefully. What words come to mind? Be ready to give me some ideas, what does the image connote.
  112. 112. You’ve just used one of the senses in the previous slide? Which one? Close your eyes. Don’t talk. What sense do you have to use now with this link? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTiRw7kx97E Extension: Why is it important to use the senses? How does it help your imagination? AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) • You could use imaginative and creative vocabulary to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6)
  113. 113. Here are the words we use in English to explain some sensual imagery. Using the images as clues, write a definition for each one. 1) Visual imagery makes you imagine… 2) Tactile 3) Auditory 4) Olfactory AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6)
  114. 114. Class Objectives • To pick out different types of imagery from a poem • To use imagery in a poem to create a dramatic effect. PLTS: Reflective Learners: I can assess myself and others and identify opportunities and achievements I can give and receive feedback and use it to improve mine and other people’s achievements. AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) 4) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) 5)
  115. 115. Learning Outcomes AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) You could use imaginative and creative vocabulary to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) 5)
  116. 116. Imagery Game Some volunteers will look at an object in a box Using: 1. Two adjectives 2. A simile 3. A Metaphors 4. A Clue of their choice You will describe that object but not reveal what it is. The class will try to work out what the object is AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) 4) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 5) 6)
  117. 117. Nature: Full of Imagery! Let’s read it line by line! • AF7 Select You must appropriate be able and effective to understand vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • You You must should be able be to able understand to use and imagery pick out four in different your own types creative of imagery (writing level 4) (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • • You You could could use use imaginative imaginative and creative and adjectives creative to produce adjectives effective to imagery produce with an effective intentional imagery effect (level (level 5) 6) 5)
  118. 118. Nature's Beauty Through the carved columns of wood Sunlight strips slash through the green umbrella of leafy fingers. Gently the old giants hum and blow the scent of leaf mould and woodsmoke through their ancient home. Fragrant flowers pattern the wood floor Like paint spatters Buzzing bees nourish on nectar Wafting perfumes and pollen Into the slow stream of life. Lazy trout shimmer their rainbow scales in the quicksilver river as majestic deer lift their crowned heads to stare at you, The intruder. Anne Mann
  119. 119. Annotate the Poem With your partner underline the type of imagery you have been given. 1) Visual 2) Tactile 3) Auditory 4) Olfactory • AF7 Select You must appropriate be able and effective to understand vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • You You must should be able be to able understand to use and imagery pick out four in different your own types creative of imagery (writing level 4) (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • • You You could could use use imaginative imaginative and creative and adjectives creative to produce adjectives effective to imagery produce with an effective intentional imagery effect (level (level 6) 5) 5)
  120. 120. PEE Paragraph! Choose one phrase you’ve underlined. Point: Explain what type of imagery you are looking at Evidence: Quote the phrase you have found that shows that kind of imagery Explain: Describe the effect of the imagery Challenge: • Can you explain the effect of the individual words chosen • Can you complete more than one PEE paragraph AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 5)
  121. 121. Example The poet uses olfactory imagery “the scent of honey” to help the reader imagine what it was like to be there amongst all the fragrant flowering plants. AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 5) 6) Point Evidence Explanation
  122. 122. Learning Check 1) What is imagery, in one sentence. 2) Why is imagery an effective technique for poets to use? 3) Why did Cowles use imagery Cowles used imagery to…. Extension: Which words that Cowles used were really effective in creating imagery. AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) 5)
  123. 123. SHHHHHHHHHHHHH! DON’T LET ANYONE SEE YOUR PICTURE! Write a poem to describe your picture without saying what it is… • AF7 Select You must appropriate be able and effective to understand vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • You You must should be able be to able understand to use and imagery pick out four in different your own types creative of imagery (writing level 4) (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • • You You could could use use imaginative imaginative and creative and adjectives creative to produce adjectives effective to imagery produce with an effective intentional imagery effect (level (level 6) 5) 5) Draw a simple image from nature. Keep it a secret!!
  124. 124. Your Task • Look at your image carefully • You should write a poem full of imagery (the four types) to help paint a picture in our heads. • Work on your own. 1) For two minutes just write down a phrase that you might want to use that uses a certain type of imagery (ie. Tactile) on your post-it note. You have two post-it notes to use if you have time Extension: Use a thesaurus to expand your vocabulary AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • • You should be able able to to select select language to create imagery in in your your own own creative creative writing writing ((level level 5) 4) • • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) 5)
  125. 125. What phrases did we use? When I say, walk up and stick your post-it note to the sense that your imagery appeals to! • AF7 Select You must appropriate be able and effective to understand vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • You You must should be able be to able understand to use and imagery pick out four in different your own types creative of imagery (writing level 4) (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) • • You You could could use use imaginative imaginative and creative and adjectives creative to produce adjectives effective to imagery produce with an effective intentional imagery effect (level (level 6) 5)
  126. 126. Write a poem using imagery to paint a picture in the reader’s head. You should also use: • Simile and metaphor • Personification If you’re stuck try for one minute then put your hand up. Secret Challenge! If you have an emotion written on the back of your image, you have to try to select your language carefully to create that emotion in the reader! • You must be able to understand and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • You should be able to use imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery (level 5) AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) 4) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) 5)
  127. 127. Class Reading One person read out their poem Everyone must listen carefully Make sure you can explain which ‘imagery phrase’ helped you guess and then put your hand up What emotion are they trying to evoke in the reader? • AF7 Select You must appropriate be able and effective to understand vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • You You must should be able be to able understand to use and imagery pick out four in different your own types creative of imagery (writing level 4) (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) 5) • • You You could could use use imaginative imaginative and creative and adjectives creative to produce adjectives effective to imagery produce with an effective intentional imagery effect (level (level 6) 5) 5)
  128. 128. Plenary: Self-Assessment • 1 point for every instance of imagery • 2 points for every time you used a simile, alliteration, or metaphor. • 4 points for using three or more different types of imagery. What did you score? Write it next to your poem. AF7 • AF7 Select Select You must appropriate appropriate be able and and effective effective to understand vocabulary vocabulary and pick out three different types of imagery (level 3) • • • You You You must must should be be able able be to to able understand understand to use and and imagery pick pick out out four four in different different your own types types creative of of imagery imagery (writing (level level 4) 4) (level 4) • • You You should should be be able able to to select select language language to to create create imagery imagery in in your your own own creative creative writing writing ((level level 4) 5) • • • You You You could could could use use use imaginative imaginative imaginative and and creative creative and adjectives adjectives creative to to produce produce adjectives effective effective to imagery imagery produce with with an effective an intentional intentional imagery effect effect ((level level (level 5) 6) 5)
  129. 129. Learning Outcomes AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary Did you hit your objective? You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6) AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 4) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 5) AF7 Select appropriate and effective vocabulary • You must be able to understand and pick out four different types of imagery (level 4) • You should be able to select language to create imagery in your own creative writing (level 5) • You could use imaginative and creative adjectives to produce effective imagery with an intentional effect (level 6)
  130. 130. 1) LO: Create your own Endangered Animals board game VAD • A board games idea e.g. Snakes and Ladders, Monopoly • ‘counters’ (maybe your animal characters) • It needs to be very colourful and attractive to children List of Instructions Game Objective How to start 2) You are going to write to Waddingtons, the famous board games designers, persuading them to make your game for sale. 3. Design a computer game with a cover and game instructions Remember you MUST have instructions . Use: Modals (could, should, might) Imperatives (Do NOT get caught on…) Conditionals (IF you get a chance card, you …).
  131. 131. LO: Organise information from my reading in group work WAF6 : Using punctuation accurately- Endangered Animals Task 1) All of the punctuation marks in the text on the next slide have been removed and replaced by numbers. Decide what punctuation mark has been replaced by each symbol. VAD
  132. 132. An endangered species is a group of plants or animals that is in danger of becoming extinct (1) where there will be non left living (1)(2) Here’s a terrifying fact (2) The World Conservation Union (4) which monitors endangered species (4) has worked out that 40% of earth’s species are under threat of extinction ( 3) Some of the animals that are listed as endangered are (5) (6) Blue Whale (6) Giant Panda (6) Snow Leopard (6) Tiger Choose the correct punctuation mark • ! “”, () ; : . 1= 2= 3= 4= 5= 6= VAD
  133. 133. WAF6 : Using punctuation accurately- ANSWERS An endangered species is a group of plants or animals that is in danger of becoming extinct (where there will be non left living). Here’s a terrifying fact. The World Conservation Union, which monitors endangered species, has worked out that 40% of earth’s species are under threat of extinction! Some of the animals that are listed as endangered are: • Blue Whale • Giant Panda • Snow Leopard • Tiger VAD
  134. 134. These are examples of food webs. If one thread of the web is cut (through extinction) , some of these animals could die. VAD
  135. 135. You are going to work in a small group to produce a food web. Why am I doing this in English? Here are some reasons: • You need to read the information given, very, very carefully • You need to organise the ideas from your reading • You need to organise how you will present your ideas in a group VAD
  136. 136. VAD A Forest Web In forest in the USA, a white oak tree drops an acorn which is quickly gathered up by an eastern grey squirrel. A yellow warbler (bird) lands on the tree as it finishes off its second moth of the day. In the top branches, a great horned owl sleeps, waiting for the darkness to begin its hunt the one of the hundreds of unsuspectingrodents (rats etc) scurrying across the forest floor. Above their home is a cascading stack of shelf mushrooms, one of the many fungi decaying the dead organic matter of the forest. Below their home live the millions of worms and bugs inhabiting the dark, rich, fertile forest soil. In the distance is the howl of a Coyote, which causes a white-tailed deer to lifts its head leaving its meal of grass for another time. A red-tailed hawk glides above the trees and gives out its unmistakable shriek, making the eastern cottontail freeze in its tracks. A fox snake beats its tail against a pile of leaves to mimic the sound of a rattle snake in hopes of warding off the predatory hawk. On the forest floor, bees and butterflies feed on flower nectar. A bullfrog leaps from the shore of a pond covered in duck weed hoping to find an insect meal. Through the clusters of cattails, a bass leaps from the water, undoubtedly in search for the minnows that reside in the waters that are full with bugs and plankton. An osprey soaring above eyes the movement in the pond hoping to score a fish of his own. A female wood duck glides down into the pond from her nest in the adjacent tree, letting out several quacks in an attempt to convince her ducklings to make the 30 foot leap from the nest above into the water. From a tall patch of grass, a grasshopper leaps up only to disappear with the flicker of the bullfrog’s tongue. Working as a group , see if you can make a food web. It’s a lot harder then you think!!! (Use to photocopied sheets)
  137. 137. • Peer assess who has produced the best food web which is clear, detailed and shows understanding of your reading. VAD
  138. 138. VAD
  139. 139. We are going to see the rabbit We are going to see the rabbit, We are going to see the rabbit, Which rabbit, people say? Which rabbit, ask the children? Which rabbit? The only rabbit, The only rabbit in England, Sitting behind a barbed wire fence Under the floodlights, neon lights, Sodium lights, Nibbling grass On the only patch of grass In England, in England (Except the grass by the hoardings Which doesn’t count.) We are going to see the rabbit, And we must be there on time. First we shall go by escalator, Then we shall go by underground, And then we shall go by motorway And then by helicopterway, And the last ten yards we shall have to go On foot. And now we are going All the way to see the rabbit. We are nearly there, We are longing to see it, And so is the crowd Which is here in thousands With mounted policemen And big loudspeakers And bands and banners, And everyone has come a long way. But soon we shall see it Sitting and nibbling The blades of grass On the only patch of grass In- but something has gone wrong! Why is everyone so angry, Why is everyone jostling and slanging and complaining? The rabbit has gone, Yes, the rabbit has gone. He has actually burrowed down into the earth And made himself a warren, under the earth. Despite all these people, And what shall we do? What can we do? It is all a pity, you must be disappointed. Go home and do something else for today, Go home again, go home for today. For you cannot hear the rabbit, under the earth, Remarking rather sadly to himself, by himself, As he rests in his warren, under the earth: “It won’t be long, they are bound to come, They are bound to come and find me, even here.” Alan Brownjohn Click for poem VAD Task 1) Find and write out e.g. of a) Repetition b) Personal pronouns c) Connectives d) Rhetorical questions e) Speech
  140. 140. Task 2) Re-draft your extended metaphor poem with a wider range of techniques. OR Create a totally new idea which shows how fragile animal survival is. Write the poem in the centre of your page , leaving room for annotations. Try to use the following: • Similes • Extended metaphor • Repetition • Personal pronouns • Connectives • Rhetorical questions • Speech VAD Task 3) PLANET PLANET EARTH EARTH It has to be spread out, the skin of this planet, It has to has to be be ironed, spread the sea in its out, whiteness; the and the hands keep on moving, skin of smoothing this the planet, holy surfaces. has to be ironed, the sea in its whiteness; and the hands keep on moving, smoothing the holy surfaces. metaphor Analyse and explain your ideas with labels , showing all the techniques you have used and compare through some peer marking
  141. 141. • Tyger tiger burning bright http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXsiW7A--dY VAD
  142. 142. VAD
  143. 143. NEXT Slides are starters VAD
  144. 144. Using punctuation accurately End punctuation Add the correct punctuation to the end of these sentences . a) Was that your dog barking b) Scoop up the dog’s mess now c) How much does it cost to buy a pedigree dog d) Go e) There are an estimated 400 million dogs in the world Apostrophes •Place the apostrophes where needed in these sentences. a) Dont pull the dogs tail. b) Doctor John Dolittle is the main character of a series of childrens books by Hugh Lofting. He is famous for being able to talk to animals. c) Id love to get a pet dog but its not fair to leave it in the house all day when VAD Im at work. d) Asian elephants ears are smaller than African elephants. e) Bugs Bunnys famous catch phrase is ‘Whats up, doc?’
  145. 145. WAF4 WHEN TO START A NEW PARAGRAPH IN NON-FICTION TEXTS In non- fiction texts you need to start a new paragraph for: •a change in topic •a change in time •a change in place •a change of speaker •a change of viewpoint •to make a new point within a topic Task : Read through the two short news articles and annotate for the reasons why there has been a change in paragraph. Task a) A fox cub has been rescued after being tangled up in a cricket net in Norfolk. A member of the public saw the trapped animal and called the RSPCA. Staff from A= B = the charity then freed the cub and released him back into the wild. The RSPCA inspector said that is the net had been lifted off the ground just a little VAD C = D = bit, the fox wouldn’t have got stuck. He believes that it’s important that sports clubs take more care with all their equipment to stop it harming animals.
  146. 146. VAD Task B RARE PIGS ARE MISTAKEN FOR SHEEP These furry pigs look pretty unusual- in fact they’re so woolly they’ve been A = mistaken for sheep at their home in Essex! They’re a really rare breed of pig that has curly, woolly hair on its back. The three pigs were imported to the UK in 2006 to start a special programme that, B = it’s hoped, will save the breed. The three Mangalitza pigs are called Buddy, Margot and Porsche, and the staff at C = Tropical Wings zoo believe Porsche might be pregnant already. The breed is thought to be native to Austria and Hungary, and many visitors do D = not realise they’re pigs. Denise Cox who works at the zoo says, ‘At first sight people think they’re sheep. E = It’s not until they turn around and you see their faces and snouts that you realise they are in fact pigs.’ She added: ‘The woolly coat makes them very hardy. In the summer it’s thought F = that it may help protect them from sunburn.’
  147. 147. HAVEN’T WE SEEN THAT DANCING DOG BEFORE? Indicate where the paragraphs should go It was the dancing dog act that thrilled millions on Saturday night’s opening episode of Britain’s Got Talent. But if you felt that the routine was a bit too familiar then you will have a good cause. It has emerged that Tina and Chandi are TV veterans and have appeared on other talent shows. Rescue dog Chandi showed off her ballet and quickstep moves with her owner Tina Humphrey, 37, from Hampshire. But she had already impressed viewers three years ago when the pair picked up a £10,000 prize after winning a 2007 heat on BBC 1’s When Will I Be Famous? presented by Graham Norton. They have also won prizes at Crufts for their act, as recently as last year, and have appeared on Blue Peter and Richard and Judy. Chandi won all three Heelwork-To-Music and Freestyle Finals at Crufts 2009- the only dog to have achieved all three wins at the same event. An ITV spokesperson said that Britain’s Got Talent does not enforce any rules blocking performers who have appeared on other TV shows. But there are concerns that fresher talent is being stifled and that the duo will have an advantage because they are already known to viewers. Kate Nichols, 18, who was in the 2008 final of the show with her own dancing dog Gin, said: ‘Chandi is a showbiz dog, she has grown up appearing on shows and TV. What’s unique about Gin is that I taught her all those tricks at home. When she went on BGT it was the first time she’d ever been on stage. Miss Humphrey refused to get drawn into the row, simply saying: ‘I have nothing VAD but admiration for fellow dog performers.’
  148. 148. HAVEN’T WE SEEN THAT DANCING DOG BEFORE? It was the dancing dog act that thrilled millions on Saturday night’s opening episode of Britain’s Got Talent. But if you felt that the routine was a bit too familiar then you will have a good cause. It has emerged that Tina and Chandi are TV veterans and have appeared on other talent shows. Rescue dog Chandi showed off her ballet and quickstep moves with her owner Tina Humphrey, 37, from Hampshire. But she had already impressed viewers three years ago when the pair picked up a £10,000 prize after winning a 2007 heat on BBC 1’s When Will I Be Famous? presented by Graham Norton. They have also won prizes at Crufts for their act, as recently as last year, and have appeared on Blue Peter and Richard and Judy. Chandi won all three Heelwork-To-Music and Freestyle Finals at Crufts 2009- the only dog to have achieved all three wins at the same event. An ITV spokesperson said that Britain’s Got Talent does not enforce any rules blocking performers who have appeared on other TV shows. But there are concerns that fresher talent is being stifled and that the duo will have an advantage because they are already known to viewers. Kate Nichols, 18, who was in the 2008 final of the show with her own dancing dog Gin, said: ‘Chandi is a showbiz dog, she has grown up appearing on shows and TV. What’s unique about Gin is that I taught her all those tricks at home. When she went on BGT it was the first time she’d ever been on stage. Miss Humphrey refused to get drawn into the row, simply saying: ‘I have nothing but admiration for fellow dog performers.’ VAD
  149. 149. Commas Commas are used to : • Separate items in a list : My favourite sports are football, basketball, swimming and athletics. • To separate a main clause from a subordinate clause (s) in complex sentences when the subordinate clause appears before or in the middle of a main clause : Quickly to avoid the snarling dog, Becky jumped over the wall. The fierce dog, who had escaped its leash, came tearing after her. • To introduce direct speech and replace the full stop at the end of a spoken sentence: He said, “Hello.” • “Don’t talk to me,” replied Becky. • To attach a question tag to a statement : You do understand, don’t you?” Put the missing commas in each of the sentences below. 1. The hedgehog was about 30 centimetres long with prickly spines. 2. Have you seen my new pet rat Stinky? 3. In the middle of the night our dog started to bark. 4. I saw two animals a deer and a elk in the woods. 5. Can I have a pet rabbit Dad? 6. The most popular breeds of dog in the UK are the labrador, the cocker spaniel, the German shepherd, the Staffordshire bull terrier and the boxer. VAD
  150. 150. VAD
  151. 151. LO: Appreciate the historical context and appeal of writers from our literary heritage We are going to look at an extract from one of Britain’s most famous novelists, Thomas Hardy. It was written over 14O years ago. Can you predict what it might be about? They waited, and it grew lighter, with the dreary light of a snowy dawn. She went out, gazed along the road, and returning said, "He’s not coming. Drunk last night, I expect. The snow is not enough to hinder him, surely!" VAD
  152. 152. There are two people talking here. A man and a woman: Arabella and Jude. The woman feels far more about the pig than the man. Make a list of comments made by Arabella using the letters, and the same for Jude. VAD a) Can’t be put off. There’s no more victuals for the pig. He ate the last mixing o’ barleymeal yesterday morning. b) Well – you must do the sticking – there’s no help for it. c) What – he has been starving? d) I’ll stick him effectually, so as to make short work of it. e) Don’t be such a tender-hearted fool! f) He must die slow. g) That accounts for his crying so. Poor creature! h) Have a little pity on the creature! i) Every good butcher keeps un bleeding long. j) Hold up the pail to catch the blood, and don’t talk! k) A creature I have fed with my own hands. l) He’s dead. The meat must be well bled.
  153. 153. Starter – reminder of topic sentences Stalactites and stalagmites are formed inside limestone caves. The water that drips steadily from the roof contains a mineral called calcite. The water dries but the calcite remains and slowly builds up into a column. Stalactites grow upwards from the cave floor. Sometimes the two columns meet to form a pillar. What is the topic sentence? What do the rest of the sentences do? Complete a paragraph using the following topic sentence: School uniform does not allow students to express themselves. VAD

×