Sourcing Open Educational Resources in the Health Sciences Faculty at the University of Cape Town

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Openness is changing the educational landscape. This presentation gives a glimpse into the process of promoting OER.

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  • For some, quite uncomfortable
  • Globalization in a connected, collaborative higher education field
  • Self study for students
  • Resource for educators & students
  • Showcasing African knowledge production
  • Showcasing African knowledge production
  • Open Educational Resources (OER) OER are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open licence that permits their free use and, in some instances, re-purposing by others. The use of open file formats improves access and reuse potential of OERs which are developed and published digitally. Open educational resources can include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, research articles, videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge. OER is not synonymous with online learning or eLearning. Rather, many OER – while shareable in a digital format – are also printable. Given the bandwidth and connectivity challenges common in some developing countries, a high percentage of resources will be shared as printable resources, rather than being designed solely for use in online learning.
  • Globalization in a connected, collaborative higher education field
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Philosophy of OER
  • Recognizing abundance of information
  • Recognizing abundance of information
  • Sourcing Open Educational Resources in the Health Sciences Faculty at the University of Cape Town

    1. 1. Sourcing Open Educational Resources (OER) in the Health Sciences Faculty @ UCT Teaching and Learning Conference st 21 October 2013 Veronica Mitchell, Greg Doyle and Nicole Southgate Education Development Unit, Health Sciences Faculty University of Cape Town, South Africa
    2. 2. OER Team @ HSF 2011 2012
    3. 3. Open Scholarship @ UCT A changing educational landscape
    4. 4. Commitment to openness to openness Commitment Signing the Berlin Declaration Images from http://blogs.uct.ac.za/blog/oer-uct
    5. 5. Open Access week 2012
    6. 6. Uneven terrain Carpeted_Commons.jpg
    7. 7. Uneven terrain
    8. 8. Success stories http://www.flickr.com/photos/hikingartist/5726834773/sizes/s/in/photostream
    9. 9. Open Scholarship @ UCT Powe r Point 1600 views A changing educational landscape
    10. 10. Open Scholarship @ UCT Textb ook 1100 views > 100,00 downloads
    11. 11. Open Scholarship @ UCT YouT u 174,000 views Knowledge as a public good be vi d eos
    12. 12. www.tagxedo.com Sharing
    13. 13. New paradigms
    14. 14. UNESCO-COL GUIDELINES “ OER are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open licence that permits their free use and, in some instances, re-purposing by others. The use of open file formats improves access and reuse potential of OERs which are developed and published digitally http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0021/002136/213605e.pdf 
    15. 15. WHY OER ? http://www.flickr.com/photos/hikingartist/5726834773/sizes/s/in/photostream
    16. 16. Why OER for individual educators? ? Knowledge as a public good
    17. 17. Health education Occupational and Environmental Health Research English English iSi Xhosa Aldicarb sticker French Pesticide Label Card
    18. 18. Why OER for individual educators? ? Facilitate blended learning
    19. 19. Occupational Therapy resource Occupation Based Community Development Framework
    20. 20. Why OER for individual educators? ? Deeper learning Multimodal Collaborative connections
    21. 21. Health & human rights education Themes International Local Disability LGBTI Psychological Society of SA Local & international LGBTI NGOs http://opencontent.uct.ac.za/Health-Sciences/Public-Health-and-Family-Medicine/The-Human-Rights-Key
    22. 22. Health & human rights education e.g. GenderDynamiX Resources Psychological Society of SA Position statement on sexual & gender diversity http://www.psyssa.com/doc-frame.asp? doc=PsySSA_sexuality_gender_position_statement_2013.pdf http://www.genderdynamix.org.za/about/
    23. 23. Why OER for individual educators? ? Sav e s tim e Promotes alternate pedagogies e.g. flipped classroom / blended learning Increases impact of teaching materials Extends use of teaching resources to other learners Pedagogical idea sharing Fosters connections between other colleagues, departments, universities, cross-disciplinary studies, other roleplayers Profiles teaching Creates record of teaching for teaching portfolios
    24. 24. R’s Permissions Reuse Redistribute Remix Revise David Wiley http://opencontent.org/definition/ Openness
    25. 25. OER for departments Effective social responsiveness ? Enhances teaching coherence across courses Improved learning experiences by selecting materials in pedagogically sound and innovative ways Increase institutional visibility Ensures better long-term archiving, curation and reuse of teaching materials Attracts alumni as life-long learners
    26. 26. Benefits Expanding horizons of knowledge & experiences Sharing & building knowledge Openness & transparency Personal agency Increased potential learning resources Up to date information Building online Community of Practice
    27. 27. Funding? Initial Hewlett Foundation Sustainability? Faculty budget allocation Leaders & champions at all levels necessary
    28. 28. Academic identity ? Shifting power relations Beyond gatekeepers of knowledge Student expectations Digital divide?
    29. 29. E-Learning / Technology enhanced learning “ technology is not only transforming access to knowledge, but may also be influencing the balance of power between academic and student in knowledge production and use Janice Hansen. 2009. Displaced but not replaced: the impact of e-learning on academic identities in higher education. Teaching in Higher Education. 14:5.
    30. 30. Possible theoretical frames Ronald Barnett Supercomplexity A Will to Learn Lifewide Learning
    31. 31. Possible theoretical frames Stewart Mennin Stacey Matrix Complex Adaptive Systems Yrjo Engeström Activity theory
    32. 32. Who are the contributors ? Individuals eg. Occupational Therapy Public Health
    33. 33. bridging the shift
    34. 34. From the administrator’s perspective
    35. 35. From the administrator’s perspective Is there a known licence? Copyright Permission denied No Find open alternative Creative commons Use, attach correct licence Create alternative Copyright Clearance process Publish to OpenContent! Unable to create alternative Omit from resource /
    36. 36. Benefits vs Challenges  Busy clinician vs time spent with him/her  Volume of work vs rewards of contributing  Inability to find alternatives vs skills learned while creating them  Loss of drive to keep projects going
    37. 37. ? Educational landscape? “ [moving] from cultivating walled gardens to supporting do-it-yourself landscapes Learner Weblog Education and Learning weblog http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/cfhe12-oped12-moocs-emerging-as-landscape-of-change-part-5-questions-openness-with-mooc/ John Mak’s blog on Connectivism .
    38. 38. Thank you
    39. 39. References Barnett, R. 2000. Supercomplexity and the curriculum. Studies in higher education. 25.3: 255-265. Hardman, J. 2005.Activity theory as a potential framework for technology research in an unequal terrain. http://web.uct.ac.za/depts/educate/download/SAJHE.pdf Mennin, S. 2010. Self-organisation, integration and curriculum in the complex world of medical education. Medical Education. 44:20-20. Wiley, D. (2009) Open education license draft. Available on: http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/355 Zimmerman, B., Lindberg, C., & Plsek, P. 2001. Edgeware: insights from complexity science for health care leaders. Irving, Texas: VHA http://www.gp-training.net/training/communication_skills/consultation/equipoise/complexity/stacey.htm.

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