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One cannot imagine transmission and distribution of electricity without the ubiquitous trans-
former. Whether it is an ext...
CONTENTS
December 20166T&D India
8 NEWS
BTW-Atlanta transformer plant to commission soon
ABB India, IIT-M join hands for m...
NEWS
TW Atlanta Transformers
India Pvt Ltd expects to
commission its modern
transformer manufacturing
plant in Gujarat, by...
NEWS
T&D India December 201610
s part of the government’s
Uchchatar Avishkar Yojana
(UAY) scheme, ABB India
and IIT Madras...
T&D India December 201612
INTERVIEW
India is moving to the Smart Grid
architecture and we are sure that
in your command ar...
T&D India December 201614
time be a safe installation. Tata Power
has introduced various initiatives to
reduce space const...
T&D India December 201616
INTERVIEW
successful in. What is your take on
the matter?
Theterm“Public-PrivatePartnership”
(PP...
T&D India December 201618
INTERVIEW
What is the overall situation with
respect to BIS certification of
international suppl...
Last date for booking: January 5, 2017
Advertise in the
New Year special
edition of
CONTACT
E: abhishek.mishra@tndindia.co...
INTERVIEW
T&D India December 201620
INTERVIEW
Industries issued a quality control
order on electrical transformers on
May ...
C
Solving the
CRGO puzzle
T&D India December 201622
old rolled grain oriented
(CRGO) steel is a very
special type of steel...
viewtocurbingthewillfuluseofscrap
CRGO, mandated that India could
only import CRGO that was certified
by Bureau of Indian ...
scrap CRGO. Such units are located
in places like Dubai, Sri Lanka,
Thailand and even in some European
countries, explaine...
CRGO entering a power transformer,
even inadvertently. However, when
it comes to distribution transformers
matters are ver...
T&D India December 201626
INTERVIEW
It is generally agreed that
substandard CRGO is hurting the
Indian transformer industr...
INTERVIEW
T&D India December 201627
How has been T&R’s market with
respectto765kVclasstransformers?
In the same context, h...
T&D India December 201628
INTERVIEW
Please explain in simple terms how
CRGO steel ultimately finds its way
in transformers...
INTERVIEW
T&D India December 201629
After the government mandated
foreign CRGO suppliers to have
their products BIS-certif...
T&D India December 201630
EXPERT VIEW
What are the challenges in terms of
design and manufacture of 1,200kV
power transfor...
EXPERT VIEW
T&D India December 201631
stage, it has to be ensured
that all sharp edges are
adequately shielded including
t...
T&D India December 2016
INSIGHT
32
t is a basic principle of
electromagnetic induction that
an electric current flows in a...
T&D India December 201634
India urgently needs short-circuit testing
facilities for high-voltage transformers
In this brie...
GLOBAL SNIPPETS
Siemens and the New York startup LO3 Energy
are collaborating in the field of innovative
microgrids. The g...
T&D India December 201636
NEW LAUNCHES
Pharox Streak Pro Batten
NTL Lemnis has launched an inno-
vative product “Pharox St...
T&D India December 201637
POWER EQUIPMENT
eyveli Uttar Pradesh Power Ltd (NUPPL), a
51:49 joint venture between NLC India ...
December 201638T&D India
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General Electric Company (GE) – the sole licensor for Bharat Heavy
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PHOTO NEWS
T&D India December 201641
BB India recently commissioned a hillside 400/220kV
substation in the southern Himala...
T&D India December 201642
SHORT TAKES
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T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation
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T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation

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One cannot imagine transmission and distribution of electricity without the ubiquitous transformer. Whether it is an extra high-voltage power transformer at the power generating plant or whether a low-voltage one at the local substation, the role of a transformer is integral.

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T&D India (December 2016): The Need for Real Transformation

  1. 1. One cannot imagine transmission and distribution of electricity without the ubiquitous trans- former. Whether it is an extra high-voltage power transformer at the power generating plant or whether a low-voltage one at the local substation, the role of a transformer is integral. The transformer has unfortunately earned India a dubious distinction. On the one hand, the subcontinent is basking in glory having produced 1,200kV transformers, the highest voltage level in the world. In fact, commercial power transmission lines at this ultra-high voltage will soon become a reality in India. On the other hand, India stares at the ignominy of having the highest failure rate when it comes to distribution transformers. Studies have proved beyond doubt that low-rating distribution transformers are available at a price that is less than the sum of costs of the components of a standard-quality distribution transformer. This dichotomy is both intriguing and appalling. Transformer manufactures admit that making a distribution transformer is an “easy” task; it is nothing more than assembling large components. Unscrupulous elements can easily start their business and can even earn handsomely by selling their substandard products to power utili- ties. As capital goods equipment, distribution transformers are expected to last for 25-30 years but we have transformers that reach their end of life within 4-5 years. It is the entire value chain in the Indian transformer industry that needs urgent attention and correction. There are major issues in the sourcing of raw material—mainly CRGO steel that needs to be imported in the absence of local manufacturing facilities. There are inadequacies in enforcing quality standards during production, and there are serious pitfalls in the procure- ment process of power distribution utilities. Power distribution utilities need to think beyond the archaic L1 procurement principle where equipment is generally ordered from suppliers quoting the lowest, in a competitive bid. This L1 procurement simply does not account for quality. This is how substandard transformers enter the power grid, and this is exactly why, quality-conscious manufacturers that have invested time, money and resources in creating superior products are ironically edged out. While one cannot wish away the process of tendering, at least when it comes to govern- ment expenditure, there is enough reason to transform the procurement process. This is in the ultimate interest of the consumer, and the nation. An inefficient distribution transformer can deprive the supply of electricity, and over a period of time, can even made adverse contribution to socio-economic development. One must admit that the government is doing much to bring in transparency in the procure- ment process, across all sectors. However, what is needed today is a radical transformation in basic tenets that govern the tendering and procurement process. Any serious effort in weeding out suppliers of inferior distribution transformers must be supported and encouraged. After all, electricity can be a meaningful enabler of development only when it reaches the end con- sumer; and it is in this very context that a distribution transformer becomes a vital link in the electricity value chain. December 20164T&D India EDIT PAGE The need for real transformation If you begin to understand what you are without trying to change it, then what you are undergoes a transformation. — J. Krishnamurti Printed by Abhishek Mishra, published by Abhishek Mishra on behalf of Amber Media LLP and printed at M/s Sanmitra Offset Printers, Gala No.219/B, Sussex Industrial Estate Premises Co-op Society Ltd, D.K. Cross Marg, Byculla (East), Mumbai 400027 and published at 412, Veena Chambers, Clive Road No.4, Masjid (E), Mumbai 400009. Editor: Venugopal Pillai Editor Venugopal Pillai Chief Editorial Advisor Harish Rao Creative Director Nitin Parkar Head – Business Development Abhishek Mishra Manager – Sales Hemant Kumar Head – Subscription, Circulation & Production Raghuvansh Pandey Feedback may be sent to editor@tndindia.com
  2. 2. CONTENTS December 20166T&D India 8 NEWS BTW-Atlanta transformer plant to commission soon ABB India, IIT-M join hands for microgrids 12 INTERVIEW Private sector participation can help improve operating efficiency Ashok Sethi, COO & ED, Tata Power Also: Global Snippets (35) Orders & Contracts (40) Achievement (41) Short Takes (42) 30 EXPERT VIEW Designing 1,200kV power transformers can pose huge challenges Dr Katsutoshi Toda, Chairman & Managing Director, Toshiba Transmission & Distribution India Pvt 32 34 INSIGHT Q+A Copper: Material of choice for power transformer conductors Manas Kundu, Director, Energy Solutions at International Copper Association, India. India urgently needs short-circuit testing facilities for high-voltage transform Dr. M.K. Shah, Director, ERDA 36 NEW LAUNCHES Pharox Streak Pro Batten Prototyping boards from Microchip Automation cables from Nexans Siemens 800A switch 37 POWER EQUIPMENT Major orders for Ghatampur power plant placed FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS 18 INTERVIEW Imports of inferior CRGO must stop B. Lal, Director General, Indian Transformer Manufacturers’ Association (ITMA) 22 LEAD STORY Solving the CRGO puzzle In this special story, Venugopal Pillai takes an inquiring look into the CRGO muddle, and highlights another 26 INTERVIEW Our aim is to offer good quality at reasonable cost Jitendra U. Mamtora, 28 INTERVIEW It is time India becomes self-reliant in CRGO Saif F. Qureishi,
  3. 3. NEWS TW Atlanta Transformers India Pvt Ltd expects to commission its modern transformer manufacturing plant in Gujarat, by early next year. Speaking to T&D India duringtheSwitchGlobalExpoin Gujarat, Nick Ye Wang, Director, BTW Atlanta Transformers, said that the greenfield plant coming up at Ankhi village in Bharuch district is likely to commission by February 2017. Around 80 per cent of the works have been completed, noted Wang. Discussing the joint venture, which was formed in 2012, Wang explained that 90 per cent of the equity in the joint venture is held by BTW (Baoding Tianwei Baobian Electric Co Ltd), an entity owned by the Chinese government, while the remaining 10 per cent is with Gujarat-based Atlanta Electricals Pvt Ltd. When asked about why BTW did not venture alone in India, Wang explained that the Chinese principals strongly advocated the need of a local partner. It is interesting to note that Atlanta Electricals Pvt Ltd, a manufacturer of power and distribution transformers, will manufacture transformers up to the 220kV range, while the joint venture will focus on high-voltage transformers, of 220kV and above. Dwelling on the product range, Nick Ye Wang explained that BTW- Atlanta will manufacture power transformers and reactors up to 1,200kV, traction transformers (up to 220kV), phase-shifting transformers (up to 400kV) and even HVDC converter transformers (up to 800kV). “The products will be rolled out in phases,” Wang said. It is worth observing that Chinese electrical equipment makers are now actively considering setting up of a local manufacturing base, in order to supply to government-owned entities. After much deliberation by industry associations, which asked for a level-playing field for Indian companies, the government has now mandated that suppliers desirous of catering to Indian projects need to have a local manufacturing base. Another leading transformer manufacturer from China, TBEA (Tebian Electric Apparatus), has already set up its wholly-owned Indian subsidiary TBEA Energy (India) Pvt Ltd. The Indian outfit commissioned its plant, located at Karjan in Vadodara, Gujarat, in November 2015. Wang observed that BTW and TBEA are leaders in the Chinese transformer market and are regarded as strong competitors in China. Highlighting BTW’s achievements in the home country, Wang said that it has supplied a 1,000 MVA, 1,000kV single-phase auto transformer that is part of China’s first 1,000kV transmission line and has been in operation since the end of 2008. High voltage transformers (750kV and above) supplied by BTW worldwide are claimed to have a zero failure rate since 2002. Baoding Tianwei Baobian Electric Co Ltd (BTW) has its roots in Baoding Transformer, founded in 1958. On being questioned about the prospects for BTW-Atlanta in India, Wang exuded optimism and noted that the joint venture will largely cater to the needs of high-voltage equipment, including 1,200kV gear, of Central transmission utility Power Grid Corporation of India Ltd. T&D India December 20168 BTW-Atlanta transformer plant to commission soon B The booth of BTW-Atlanta at the Switch Global Expo 2016, Vadodara. NTPC to get power lines for coal mining CHHATTISGARH State Power Transmission Company Ltd (CSPTCL) will soon start work on the preliminary and detailed survey for development of a 132kV power supply transmission system for NTPC Ltd’s new coal blocks at Banai and Bhalumuda in Raigarh district of Chhattisgarh. Speaking to T&D India CSPTCL said that the new lines will feed electricity to facilitate mining activities of NTPC at the new coal blocks. Finer details of the transmission scheme will be known only after the survey works are completed, he said. The Banai coal block, with reserves of around 630 million tonnes, was allotted to NTPC in March 2015. Commercial production from the mine is expected to start in May 2020. The block is linked to NTPC’s upcoming 2,640-mw Barethi-I power plant in Madhya Pradesh that is expected to commission in FY20. Allotted in October 2015, the Banai coal block has estimated reserves of 550 million tonnes and is expected to go in production by June 2021. Coal from this mine will be supplied to the NTPC’s 3x800-mw Kudgi supercritical power plant in Bijapur district of Karnataka. The power plant is under construction, albeit with minor delay in its commissioning schedule. The December 2016 while the remaining two would do so by May and July 2017.
  4. 4. NEWS T&D India December 201610 s part of the government’s Uchchatar Avishkar Yojana (UAY) scheme, ABB India and IIT Madras will collaborate to develop a power management system to optimize the operation of multiple microgrids, with and without grid connection, while managing electricity supply to villages. This system will also enable the integration of individual solar PV rooftops to a village microgrid, a release from ABB India said. The government of India is looking at a generation capacity of 40 GW in the next five years through grid- connected rooftop solar PV and small scale solar PV plants. Such clusters have the capability of generating and using renewable energy locally from one kilowatt to a few hundred kilowatts. It is imperative to network such locally distributed nano- or microgrids for optimal usage of renewable power across users, keeping in mind the dynamic demand/supply situation. Such inter-connection and interleaving of microgrids with the existing distribution system and infrastructure will provide economic benefits for the people, in terms of reduced outages and lower cost of power. The project scope includes microgrids of 20 to 100 kW capacity equipped with battery storage. Detailed studies and simulation of the various system components along with related control and optimization logics, protection criteria, monitoring and communication will also be undertaken, the release added. aharashtra State Electricity Distribution Company Ltd. (MSEDCL, also referred to as Mahadiscom) has signed an agreement with Sensus, a Xylem brand, and a global supplier of smart meters and utility- grade communications systems. The agreement will enable MSEDCL to pilot FlexNet, which is Sensus’ Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) solution. The pilot project will be implemented in the Nagpur area, on trial basis. This technology trial, according to a release by Sensus, will start in the next three to four months and will simplify installation and commissioning of the Sensus FlexNet AMI solution in MSEDCL’s Nagpur area. MSEDCL’s requirements for coverage, capacity and part of longer-term needs of smart grids will be tested, by the Sensus FlexNet AMI solution. The FlexNet Long Range Radio technology has exceptional penetration and reach to enable a simple and robust architecture for all applications. It is expected to help MSEDCL, to reduce power theft, data loss and improve billing and collection processes. With operations and service facilities in five continents, Sensus is a global leader in utility infrastructure systems and resource conservation. The Sensus release noted that at present, around 32 per cent of Indians live in urban areas and due to inherenet diversity amongst consumer classes, implementation of urban smart metering communication networks becomes difficult. ABB India, IIT-M join hands for microgrids A M Digital simulation centre proposed ABB India has signed a MoU with National Institute of Technical kind digital simulation centre of excellence for teachers, students and industry engineers to develop a deeper understanding of the underlying multi-physics and design principles for the manufacturing of various best in class electromechanical equipment in India. The electro-mechanical equipment industry is a critical element in the success of the proposed exponential growth in the Indian power sector and needs to reach a quality level among the best in class to become a manufacturing hub of global repute. The transformation of the power generation, transmission and distribution sector as well as of manufacturing industries increases the demand for competitive and high quality products, both to satisfy the domestic demand and to increase India’s export, a release from ABB India said. Optimal and robust design of electro-mechanical equipment in the current context is guided by the recent advances in high performance computing machines, parallel processing and simulation tools. Digitalization is starting to pervade human activities, be this leisure or business, still manufacturing of any equipment must be based on reliable design to handle the basic natural phenomena, namely thermal, mechanical and electromagnetics. SHILPI Cable Technologies has planned to launch more products in the B2C segment with a view to improving its market penetration, according to Manish Goel, Managing Director, quoted in a statement New B2C launches will be made in the second the company expects to boost its overall performance through the proposed foray in the railway segment, Goel said. 26.84 per cent growth in revenues compared with contribution from all the segments. Our focus on consistently increasing our network and new product development using advance research and development techniques have augmented well with our vision to become a $1-billion company by 2020.” More B2C brands from Shilpi Cable Mahadiscom in tie-up with Sensus for AMI
  5. 5. T&D India December 201612 INTERVIEW India is moving to the Smart Grid architecture and we are sure that in your command areas in Mumbai and Delhi, Tata Power has already introduced smart grid-like features. Please discuss. Tata Power is the first Indian power utility to launch the Automated Demand Response (ADR) project with smart meters in Delhi last year. It is one of the first projects in the world where ADR and AMI (advanced metering infrastructure for smart meters) are conceptualised together. The project is implemented in partnership with IBM, Honeywell, Landis+Gyr with participation of select industrial and commercial consumers of Tata Power Delhi Distribution; and has been rolled out post the approval of the Delhi Electricity Regulatory Commission (DERC). Tata Power, Mumbai installed Automatic Meter Reading system in year 2009, covering all industrial and commercial consumers as well as DT check meters. The data from meters is captured in central server every midnight using GPRS modems. The process of meter reading and billing wasthusfullyautomatedandrequires no human intervention. In year 2013, one of the largest Radio Frequency basedsmartmeteringprojectsinIndia was installed in Mumbai covering about 5,000 low-end residential consumers. This project included the installation of meters with built in RF communication modules, data concentrator units (DCUs), head end software and meter data acquisition (MDAS). Metered data is collected every hour through RF mesh network communication and transmitted to a central server using GPRS network. Meter data received is used for automated generation of bills without human interference Take us through the technological advancements that you have planned in your power distribution circles in Mumbai and Delhi. Also, tell us about improvements to sub- transmission infrastructure. Tata Power is a pioneer in innovation and technology and has brought tremendous value addition and benefits to its customers through various initiatives. Mumbai with its typical demographic spread poses challenges of installing substations in public areas. With little or no open space available for establishing such substations, it was imperative for Tata Power to look for technological interventions that could overcome the space constraints and at the same Tata Power is amongst India’s oldest and largest power utilities, with a presence the entire power value Tata Power has ushered the public private partnership in each of the segments of power generation, transmission and distribution. We have Ashok Sethi taking us through the power distribution activities of Tata Power, highlighting the vast improvements that the to its power distribution circles. Private sector participation can bring about much needed distribution, feels Venugopal Pillai. Private sector participation can — Ashok Sethi, COO & ED, Tata Power
  6. 6. T&D India December 201614 time be a safe installation. Tata Power has introduced various initiatives to reduce space constraint & ensure timely installation and enhance safety of its distribution network in Mumbai such as: Thehighvoltagedistributionsystem (HVDS) deploys pole mounted transformers with associated low voltage (LV) distribution. The LV coaxial service cables and the LV connector system are provided with plug-in type design thereby reducing technical losses and enhanced safety features coupled with higher reliability. These technological introductions for HV/LV distribution system are essentially tool free and eliminates the risk of errors in the field. The E-House (Electrical House) helps to reduce space and installation time for 33/11kV grid substations. E-House is a prefabricated enclosure housing the 33kV/11kV switchgear with associated auxiliaries installed, tested and ready to be commissioned once delivered to site. The installation of underground feeder pillar (Link Box) along with a new generation compact and fully insulated service pillar into the LV distribution network, will help to enhance safety and cut down the electrical losses, eliminate the menace of power theft and pilferages in congested areas where space is a constraint. TheCentrehasintroducedtheUDAY (Ujwal Discom Assurance Yojana) scheme with an objective of making state-owned power distribution utilities financially viable. What is your overall view on the scheme and its potential success? UDAY is a very promising initiative. UDAY provides an enabling environment and assures the rise of vibrant and efficient state discoms through the permanent resolution of past as well as potential future issues of the sector. It empowers discoms with the opportunity to break even in the next few years. A critical element of UDAY is that states will take over the future losses of discoms in a graded manner. Thus starting from 2017-18, the loss that a discom may incur will be considered for the state’s fiscal deficit FRBM targets. In 2017-18, 5 per cent of the previous year’s losses would be taken over; in 2018-19, 10 per cent; 2019-20, 25 per cent; and by 2020- 21, 50 per cent will have to be taken into the state’s FRBM fiscal deficit targets. This essentially implies that unlike previous schemes, this time the states will be responsible for any discom losses. This puts the onus on the state discoms and state governments to ensure sustainable long term solutions. The UDAY scheme can be a torchbearer for the governments “Power for All by 2019” agenda, providedthestatesacceptthescheme through a tripartite agreement between power ministry, government of india, state governments and discoms and work towards reduction of AT&C losses. Your joint venture for power distribution in Delhi—Tata Power Delhi Distribution Ltd—is hailed as the most successful public- private partnership in the power distribution sector. Tell us in brief about the vast improvement that has accrued since the days of Delhi Vidyut Board. The company’s partnership for distribution with the state government of Delhi for its North Delhi customers, Tata Power Delhi Distribution Ltd, is the only success story of privatisation in India. This company serves over 1 million customers (from a population of 4.5 million) spread over in an area of 510 sqkm and has a peak load of 1,050 mw. Since its formation in 2002, the company has launched a series of technological improvements for upgrading reliability and other customer services. Measures like energy audits, replacement of old meters with theft-proof electronic meters, automated meter reading, aggressive enforcement and public awareness drives have reduced the current AT&C loss percentage to Delhi Distribution well below the target loss level percentage that has been committed to the regulatory authorities. To create greater operational efficiencies, better load management and improvement in consumer services, TPDDL has invested over Rs.1,350 crore in capital expenditure during the past five years. TPDDL is automating its grids, mapping the network (for quicker fault location and isolation) and automating the outage management system on the gas insulated switchgear (GIS) platform. The reliability, quality of power supply and the customer services offered by TPDDL are one of the best in the country and internationally. From an average pendency of nearly One lakh new connections and a waiting period of six months to one year at the time of privatization in June 2002 today it has come down to just 4000 applications for new connections which are provided in a record three to four days’ time. We feel that privatisation of power distribution has been an area that the government has not been too TATA POWER INTERVIEW
  7. 7. T&D India December 201616 INTERVIEW successful in. What is your take on the matter? Theterm“Public-PrivatePartnership” (PPP) describes a spectrum of possible relationships between public and private sector for the cooperative provision of infrastructure services. PPP has been also implemented by way of privatization and appointment of distribution franchisee in some states. Private sector participation helps bring technical and managerial expertise, improve operating efficiency, large scale injection of capital, rationalization/cost based tariffs for services, better responsiveness to consumer needs and satisfaction. Tata Power has showcased three successful public-private partnerships in power generation, transmission and distribution in India. For generation, Tata Power and Damodar Valley Corporation (DVC) commissioned Maithon Power Ltd as the first successful public- private partnership in green field generation project in the country. For Transmission, Tata Power along with Power Grid Corporation of India Ltd. created Powerlinks Transmission Ltd for evacuation of Power from Tala hydro plant in Bhutan to Delhi. Another successful execution of Public Private Partnership can be seen through the functioning of the Tata Power Delhi Distribution Ltd (TPDDL). The organization is a joint venture between the Tata Power Company and the Government of Delhi and has bought tremendous value by bringing down AT&C losses to 13 per cent from 52 per cent in record time. No other private player has this exposure. Please discuss the relative merits and demerits of the licensing model and the franchisee model that the government is adopting to privatize power distribution. The public private partnership in the distribution of electricity encompasses all functions and obligations relating to distribution of electricity in the license area. In the licensing model, the concessionaire, selectedthroughcompetitivebidding, is responsible for maintenance, operation and upgradation of the distribution network and for the supply of electricity to the regulated consumers. Reduction of AT&C losses, improvement in the quality of power supply, strengthening of the distribution network, improved customersatisfactionandintroduction of competition through open access are some of the merits of the model. However, success of this model largely depends on its structuring. Meanwhile, the franchisee model of power distribution has the potential to addresses constraints such as political acceptability, resistance against private ownership of public assets, etc. It also provides other advantages like selection of private operator through competitive bidding, strong incentives to reduce transmission and distribution losses and significant improvement in consumer interface. We in Tata Power believe in maintaining flexibility with our approach based on the requirement of a particular project. The choice of model will depend on the requirements and the circumstances specific to a project. If you were to suggest three measures to accelerate privatization of power distribution circles, what would they be? Distribution PPP model is a good route to bring private investments in the distribution business and should be implemented in other states for efficiency improvement. There is also a pressing need to introduce new technologies and modern mining methods to improve productivity and to increase scalability and sustainability of mining operations. Other measures could be: Unbundling needs to be carried out on priority basis and open access to transmission strengthened A nominal tariff increase Alternate models of distribution particularly decentralized generation using renewable energy sources could be effectively used to address the needs of the country’s rural and semi-rural communities. Tata Power is amongst India’s oldest power utilities in India. We understand that in Mumbai, your oldest area of operation, there is a switchover facility for consumers. Please give us a background and tell us the latest position of the switchover. Tata Power currently has the license to cover the area from Colaba to Mahim, falling under Mumbai City Revenue district, Bandra to Dahisar and Chunabatti to Vikhroli of Mumbai suburban Revenue District, area of Mira Bhayandar Municipal Corporation including area covered under chene and varsave villages, which are continuous to Tata Power’s existing area of license. Tata Power is growing at a rapid pace with the significant addition of 6.8 lakh consumers in Mumbai. The consumers in the below-300 kwh category enjoy lowest tariff offered by the Company. Hence, the Company is witnessing an increase in its consumer base, especially in this category. We have to look at the growth of Mumbai in total which is growing at a rate of 3 per cent in MU (million kwh) terms. This roughly translates to a rate of 40 to 50 thousand customers per year, out of which we are adding 15 to 20 thousand into Tata Power. The number of switchover and changeover customers is difficult to predict as it is dependent on tariff. TATA POWER
  8. 8. T&D India December 201618 INTERVIEW What is the overall situation with respect to BIS certification of international suppliers of CRGO? Howmanysuppliershaveregistered so far? There are 15 foreign mills in the world, located in USA, Japan, Germany, South Korea, UK, Russia, Poland, Brazil, China etc. owned by 9-10 manufacturers producing CRGO electrical steel. All of them have already got themselves registered with BIS for certification as per IS:3024 for supply of BIS certified/marked material to Indian transformer industry directly or through their authorized dealers. What is the overall situation with respect to availability of prime grade CRGO? The global production is about 3.5 million tonnes per year, whereas the present annual requirement of the Indian industry is about 3 lakh tonnes, which is likely to go up to 4 to 5 lakh tonnes in the XII Plan period and to about 7.5 lakh per year at the end of XIII Plan period. There is no shortage of material as such. Rather the prices have reportedly fallen due to the latest market trends. Has the usage of inferior or scrap CRGO subsided over the past few years? Despite quality Control Order issued by Ministry of Steel in March 2012, effective from July 2014,there has not been much impact on the use of spurious/used/scrap CRGO in India. This is perhaps due to the strong lobby of vested interest. Protracted agitation in writing at all levels has failed as these unscrupulous elements devise ways and means to import this material with the connivance of custom authorities. There is information that scrap CRGO is being imported in the form of laminations as “transformer parts” from the neighbouring countries. Of late even rejected/scrap CRGO styled only as “scrap steel” from aboard in large quantities finds its way in the India transformer industry. In fact ITMA has written and sent a white paper after it was asked by Department of Heavy Industries in one of its meetings as the Chairman, Jt. Secretary of the meeting implored on the representing associations. The white paper has already been uploaded in ITMA’s website (www. itma.org.in) where it has been dealt with at length. What has been the success rate with respect to Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) rating for distribution transformers? BEE’s notification dated 2010 is mandatory in its Standard and Labeling Programme to produce and use star-rated (1 to 5) energy efficient distribution transformers (DTs) in the power sector. However it was incumbent upon stakeholders to use minimum 3-star rated DTs under CEA’s notification of 2010. Being under mandatory certification, it is followed and even used today. It may be noted that quality of product is a big concern even at the highest level of Hon’ble PM who had declared a slogan “Zero Defect, Zero Effect” and implored on industries not to compromise on quality on products and environment. Even Department of Heavy ITMA, with a standing of over 60 years, has the transformer and ITMA has stood for the B. Lal, in this Imports of inferior CRGO must stop — B. Lal, FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS
  9. 9. Last date for booking: January 5, 2017 Advertise in the New Year special edition of CONTACT E: abhishek.mishra@tndindia.com T: +91 (22) 6221 6616 M: (0) 98-210-06258 and give your brand unmached exposure at:
  10. 10. INTERVIEW T&D India December 201620 INTERVIEW Industries issued a quality control order on electrical transformers on May 7, 2015 effective from February 1,2016toensurethequalityofenergy efficient distribution transformers as per IS:1180 Part 1/2014 and it became mandatory for manufacture/ purchase and use only BIS certified/ marked transformer. Compliance of this order has also been enforced. Now there is a conflict: manufactures are requesting government of India to allow them the compliance of one of the two directives—BIS or BEE—as they both are addressing the same goal of producing energy efficient DTs. But the power ministry has shown its helplessness as both certifications are mandatory through Gazette notification. This is undesirable as manufacturer has to observe and complete all the formalities/ requirements of both the agencies. This not only creates hindrance in conducting the business but also involves lot of time and expenditure of yearly renewal of licence and hefty BEE’s labeling/BIS marking fees of each types of unit produced. ITMA has requested to PMO to intervene in this dual compliance vide its letter dated October 13, 2016. What is your view on the L1 procurement policy that appears to the primary reason for inferior distribution transformers being inducted in India’s power grid? As far as the matter of transformer procurement policy of L1 it pointed out that normally the purchaser of transformers, utilities/discoms place the contracts on the lowest offer criteria (L1) which infuse the use of non-prime/seconds/used material in manufacturing of transformers. It is observed that with this L1 philosophy, orders are placed even at the prices that do not even cover the material cost of the transformer. It is proposed that realistic cost level of each category of transformer should be worked out with the realistic price of the prime material by the special cell of the purchaser and the orders should not be placed below the realistic price fixed for each category coupled with the stringent checking by the purchaser/utilities/discoms at each stage of manufacturing of transformers. Some large Chinese manufacturers are setting up shop in India for transformers? What could be the possible impact on Indian manufacturers? Themainreasonofnewentrantsfrom abroad in the Indian market is either due to economic slowdown in their markets or surplus manufacturing capacity. These companies have made their own calculations to enter Indian market due to envisaged development of massive T&D infrastructure. As a matter of fact there will be no substantial impact of these outsiders but it would instead generate healthy competition for producing quality higher voltage class transformers. What is your view on the apparent lack of testing facilities in India, especially for high-voltage transformers? The current position of testing of both distribution & power transformers is not very satisfactory. DTs are only tested at CPRI Bhopal and ERDA, Vadodara as both are recognized by BIS. Recently NTH at Ghaziabad is in the process of being recognized by BIS. ITMA has requested the government of India and Director General of NTH Kolkata to establish test houses in all states as DT manufacturers have to get the transformer tested by hauling long distances which in fact add to the cost and involve lot of time for supply to the customers. In so far testing of power transformers is concerned, CPRI at Bangalore is carrying out testing up to 100 MVA units of 220kV voltage class but it lacks recognition in some parts of world. ITMA has requested CPRI to add all facilities and get itself equipped to attain international recognition. So far, all large power transformer manufacturers have to send their units to KEMA (Netherland), KERI (Korea) or CESI (Italy). This involves lot of cost, time and effort. It is however heartening to note that the government has established UHV testing station at Bina (Madhya Pradesh) in consortium of big players like BHEL, Crompton, etc under the patronage of PGCIL and CPRI. The lab will reportedly be ready to carry out testing of all units up to 400kV voltage class from January 2017 onwards. What are some of the important items of ITMA’s agenda for the overall betterment of the transformer industry? Some of the important activities of ITMA towards the overall interest and progress of the industry are: Holding conferences/workshops with all stakeholders in various states for awareness of government’s initiatives on energy efficient DTs and shall continue the same in the next calendar year from 2017 January onwards. Pursuing with the government agencies to ensure the implementation of the quality control orders on electrical transformers and CRGO material so that only BIS-certified material is used so as to ensure the quality of transformers. Pursuing with government of India to establish test houses in each state in order to facilitate testing of distribution transformers. Conducting international conferences to enable adoption of latest global technology.
  11. 11. C Solving the CRGO puzzle T&D India December 201622 old rolled grain oriented (CRGO) steel is a very special type of steel that needs complex technology to produce. Why CRGO steel or simply CRGO is important is that it is used to make laminations that ultimately find their way into transformers. In turn, transformers are indispensable to the power grid and without them, power transmission and distribution would be simply impossible. Thanks to this linkage, CRGO is not only an important physical material in the context of India’s power T&D sector, also has intangible implications— albeit due to rather undesirable reasons. It is worthwhile to know that the overall failure rate of Indian distribution transformers is amongst the highest in the world. It is embarrassingly shocking to learn that though a distribution transformer is expected to last for 20-25 years, in India the average distribution transformer has a life of just around five years. Why does a country that has indigenously produced the world’s highest-voltage (1,200kV) transformers have such a shameful record with distribution transformers? The answer lies in the “core material”, CRGO. To concise the long story, India has, for very long, been a consumer of substandard CRGO, thanks to the proliferation of this practice by unscrupulous manufacturers. The use of substandard CRGO or scrap CRGO means much monetary gain for transformer manufacturers since the cost of scrap CRGO is less than half of that of the prime variety. Further, CRGO can account for around 25-30 per cent of the overall cost of the transformer. Hence, substituting prime material by its scrap variant results in significant saving for the manufacturer but on the other hand, seriously impinges upon the efficiency and longevity of the equipment. In 2012, the government, with a LEAD STORY
  12. 12. viewtocurbingthewillfuluseofscrap CRGO, mandated that India could only import CRGO that was certified by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) with IS:3024 certification. This order was originally to take effect from July 2014 but the date has seen several subsequent relaxations. This meant that all foreign mills desirous of supplying to Indian transformer manufacturers should have their products BIS-certified. When this move was announced, it met with mixed reactions from the trade and industry. Why should a foreign supplier that is already equipped with internationally-valid certifications (for instance, IEC) be interested in complying with more formalities from India? On this count, Jitendra U. Mamtora, Chairman of Transformers & Rectifiers (India) noted that since BIS certification was a copy of IEC standards, the requirement of separate BIS certification only added a process and cost. However, it may be mentioned that at that time the global transformer market was depressed and foreign CRGO mills were straddled with over-capacity. This perhaps led to foreign suppliers subscribing to the formality. Over the years, global manufacturers got their products certified with BIS. Today, the compliance with BIS is nearly complete. According to B. Lal, Director-General, Indian Transformer Manufacturers’ Association (ITMA), interacting with T&D India, all the 16 mills owned by some 8-9 international companies have got their products BIS-certified. These mills are spread across countries like USA, UK, Japan, Germany, South Korea, Poland, Brazil, China, etc. Talking about volumes, the global CRGO manufacturing capacity is around 3.5 million tonnes per year. India’s current annual demand ranges from 2.5 lakh tonnes to 3 lakh tonnes. Given that India accounts for less than a tenth of global demand, it is pleasantly surprising to note that foreign suppliers have endeavoured to have their products BIS-certified. The main question now is: Has the usage of scrap CRGO reduced in recent times? Well, the views of industry players do suggest a state of ambiguity. In a telephonic interaction with T&D India, K.N. Singhal, Managing Director, Transtron Electricals Pvt Ltd, said that the extent of usage of scrap CRGO has definitely reduced. He estimated that only about 1 per cent scrap CRGO finds its way into Indian transformers. Singhal asserted that associations like ITMA have been appealing to transformer manufacturers to adhere to BIS- certified CRGO. While scrap CRGO usage has been on the decline, it has not yet been eliminated. The interesting question is: How is inferior CRGO finding its way into the Indian market despite the BIS- certification guideline? The modus operandi is to import used transformers that have scrap CRGO in their laminations. Such laminations qualify as “transformer parts” in imports nomenclature. It is ironic that because the imports are happening of “transformer parts,” the import duty is lower than that on prime grade CRGO! To the startling convenience of unscrupulous manufacturers, scrap CRGO is entering India and that too at a lower landed cost. Speaking to T&D India, Mukesh Jindal, Managing Director of PP Industries Ltd, a Punjab- based manufacturer of distribution transformers, explained that there exist illicit manufacturing units that produce transformers equipped with laminations made out with December 201623T&D India Cold rolled grain oriented (CRGO) steel has traditionally been a controversial and contentious issue in India. The very term “CRGO” when used in the context of the Indian transformer industry suggests two rather unpleasant realities – the willful use of inferior CRGO in distribution transformers, and the country intriguing inability to manufacture this special material locally. In this special story, Venugopal Pillai takes an inquiring look into the CRGO muddle,
  13. 13. scrap CRGO. Such units are located in places like Dubai, Sri Lanka, Thailand and even in some European countries, explained Jindal. Expounding on the subject, Saif F. Qureishi, MD & CEO, KRYFS Power Components Ltd, shared some stark details. “Second hand and defective CRGO users have set up shop in neighboring countries like Dubai, Nepal, Bangladesh, Thailand. Here, in trade free zones they import scrap or defective CRGO and either process it or send it as it is to India, falsely declaring it as either “melting scrap” through Kolkata port, or as “transformer parts” through Chennai port or “used transformers” through SEZs. Both IEEMA and ITMA have brought this to the notice of the authorities. However, unfortunately, the import of these seconds and defectivesandscrapmaterialstillgoes on unabated in this country, creating a disadvantage for those using prime material while the country is getting supplied with substandard quality of transformers.” Corroborating this view, B. Lal of ITMA highlighted that apart from the “transformer parts” route discussed above, scrap CRGO is entering the Indian market as generic “steel scrap,” thereby bypassing the BIS guideline that specifies CRGO steel. Such unethical imports of inferior CRGO are often done in connivance with customs authorities, felt Lal. WHY IS SCRAP CRGO SURVIVING? Power transmission and distribution infrastructure needs transformers at several voltage levels. What happens in a typical power T&D chain is that voltage at the source (power plant) is stepped up to say 765kV so that bulk power transmission can take place. This is achieved by a step- up transformer. As the electricity moves towards the consumer through the T&D grid, the voltage is progressively lowered through a series of step-down transformers. Those transformers dealing with lower voltages, typically up to 66kV, qualify as distribution transformers and this is where the usage of inferior CRGO is rampant. The manufacturing process of power transformers is very formal in nature, and is also capital-intensive. There is absolutely no scope for inferior APART LEAD STORY T&D India December 201624
  14. 14. CRGO entering a power transformer, even inadvertently. However, when it comes to distribution transformers matters are very different. The manufacture of distribution transformers is relatively simpler and this is borne out by the fact that thousandsofmarginalmanufacturers of distribution transformers are today surviving and even thriving. Industry sources explain that there are scores of distribution transformer manufacturers that operate in shockingly informal conditions— with no scientific techniques, no testing facilities and needless to say, no quality control. It is these unconscionable manufacturers that constitutethebiggestmarketforscrap and substandard CRGO. It is widely believedthattherearemanufacturers that sell distribution transformers at a price that is lower than the sum of costs of parts of a standard-quality transformer. Needless to say, such transformers fail in a few years and are responsible for making the distribution grid inefficient. Conscientious manufacturers simply cannot match the price offered by unscrupulous manufacturers. It is another matter that the two types of transformers cannot be compared in terms of quality. The main reason why scrap CRGO cannot be rooted out is because there isamarketforcheapandsubstandard transformers. It is ironical to note that power distribution utilities (discoms), the legitimate custodians of the distribution grid, are big consumers of substandard transformers and, in the process, of inferior CRGO. Industry experts believe that discoms are bound by the L1 criteria in during their procurement drive. Suppliers quotingthelowestpriceofequipment are unwittingly awarded contracts. The fact that these suppliers are also the “lowest” in terms of quality is legally overlooked as “L1” guidelines simply do not have any provision for quality. There is also no provision to weed out suppliers that quote unreasonably low prices. “Power utilities cannot blindly go by the L1 philosophy. They are fully aware of what quality they can expect from such L1 equipment,” a transformer manufacturer said, requesting anonymity. There is no foolproof solution to the use of inferior CRGO. As long as there is a market for transformers that use scrap CRGO, the menace of import of this material will continue. Industry observers feel that much has to do with the procurement policies of power distribution utilities. As long as “L1” procurement policies prevail, there will be a market for cheap CRGO and importers will find innovative ways and means to circumvent the legal framework. CONCLUSION CRGO has traditionally been a contentious issue in the Indian transformer industry. The illegitimate import of scrap CRGO cannot be extirpated as there is a section of transformer manufacturers that will keep finding loopholes in the legal framework and “legitimize” such imports. Making BIS certification mandatory has been a good step and it is encouraging to note that most foreign mills have complied with the requirement. A wide section of the industry feels that imports of scrap CRGO have come down and transformer manufacturers, at least the conscientious ones, are insisting on prime grade CRGO. The use of scrap CRGO in transformers has its roots in history. In the 1980s, as veteransintheindustryrecall,asevere balance of payment crisis forced Indian transformer manufacturers to resort to scrap CRGO only because it was cheap. Transformers were also designed based on such CRGO. Thus, scrap CRGO took its roots in India. Some industry players also feel that not all scrap CRGO is necessarily inferior. Some refer to CRGO as a “non-ageing” material that does not lose its efficacy over time. However, it is very difficult to know the quality of CRGO scrap. Hence, there are cases where transformer manufacturers inadvertently end up using inferior CRGO. It is fair to state that BIS certification was an effective way to ensure that the CRGO being used is of prime grade. As of now, the extent of use of imported scrap CRGO (despite the mandatory BIS certification) has come down. One industry player was confident that such scrap CRGO could be finding its way in transformers, others than those used in the power T&D grid. In the midst of the CRGO muddle is India’s longstanding inability to produce CRGO locally. It is intriguing to learn that the country has been trying to produce CRGO for over five decades now, but local production is nowhere on the horizon. While one must admit that CRGO technology is complex and fiercely guarded by the small coterie of manufacturers, the insignificant progress made by India is quite disappointing and cannot be condoned. Much of the imbroglio surrounding CRGO could be resolved if India could take meaningful steps forward in its quest forproducingthiscriticalrawmaterial locally. Note: Full interviews with ITMA, Transformers & Rectifiers (India) Ltd and KRYFS Power Components have been carried elsewhere in this edition. December 201625T&D India
  15. 15. T&D India December 201626 INTERVIEW It is generally agreed that substandard CRGO is hurting the Indian transformer industry. The government has now mandated BIS certification for international CRGO suppliers. How well has this move worked? Substandard CRGO was mostly used in distribution transformers by some of the manufacturers. In power transformers it is not easy to use substandard material. In fact manufacturers of power transformers have not benefited from this action but the costs have gone up. CRGO is totally imported and having BIS for it has no justification particularly when BIS is copy of IEC, in this case. Unnecessarily, we have added a process and thus cost. T&R very recently signed a joint venture agreement with Jingke of China. Tell us about this in some detail. After completion of the entire range of transformers and reactors up to and including 765kV, we were looking at new areas of business, of course in the power T&D sector itself. We found this is the right product line to get in. We have gone in for a JV with Jiangsu Jingke Smart Electric Company Ltd for manufacturing and marketing of GIS/HGIS/TGIS systems and products. We have 60 per cent share in JV while Jingke will hold 40 per cent. Initially all the components will come from China and we will do assembly and testing but gradually the components will be manufactured by the JV in India. We expect to achieve sales of Rs.200 crore in next two to three years’ time. We understand that T&R’s current order book is nearly Rs.1,000 crore. Could you give us the breakup of this order book by type of equipment? Yes, we have a good healthy order book of Rs.950 crore. It is a good mixture of transformers and reactors up to and including 765kV. In a span of just over two decades, Gujarat- based Transformers & has propelled itself in the league of top Indian transformer manufacturing companies. In this exclusive exchange, Jitendra Mamtora gives insights into T&R’s corporate philosophy that has contributed to the company’s success. Whilst discussing general issues in the transformer issues, Mamtora also tells us more T&R’s recent move to diversify into switchgear. An interaction by Venugopal Pillai. Our aim is to offer good quality at reasonable cost — Jitendra U. Mamtora, Chairman & Whole-time Director, FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS
  16. 16. INTERVIEW T&D India December 201627 How has been T&R’s market with respectto765kVclasstransformers? In the same context, how is the alliance with ZTR progressing? We have order in hand for 14 transformers of 765kV and have quoted for quite a few. The business is good and we are established players in this class as our transformers have beenoperatinginthesystemfornearly three years now. Our arrangement with ZTR was for joint bidding against requirement of customers. There are no such tenders now and we qualify on our own. ZTR has some financial problems at their end but we continue to enjoy good relationship. T&R has been amongst few suppliers for the 1,200kV UHVAC Bina test line of Power Grid Corporation of India. Tell us about your involvement in some detail. Also, when do you see India adopting 1,200kV lines on commercial scale? We have supplied this transformer almost three years back. Our unit along with other suppliers has been commissioned and operating properly. PGCIL who will be the only customer initially, has no planned tenders for this rating in the near future. However as and when they come out with one, we will automatically be approved and can compete in all such tenders. But yes, this (the 1,200kV project) has given us a lot of confidence. Tell us about T&R’s ultra-modern Moraiya plant. Currently, at what capacity-utilisation (percentage) is the plant operating? Do you have any capacity expansion plans? The plant is well established and fairly well loaded. We have good mixture of 765kV and 400kV transformers and reactors. It is healthy mix that helps the best utilization of any plant. Presently, it is working on 75 per cent capacity. We have no immediate plan to expand the Moraiya unit. In general, what is your view on India’s self-sufficiency with regard to testing of extra high-voltage equipment? PGCIL, NTPC and NHPC are jointly putting up a short-circuit lab near Jhansi. I understand this lab is getting ready soon. There have been some delays but that is normal for a project of such magnitude. This will definitely help both manufacturers and buyers; presently the equipment has to be sent to KEMA for testing. There may be some teething problems initially but in the long term it will be good. T&R has begun supplying transformers to solar power plants. What is your outlook on this product line, given the country’s ambitions of 100 GW of solar capacity by 2022? Yes, we have also been supplying transformers for the solar power plants and it is an ongoing business. The revised renewable energy target of the government of India GOI is 175 GW. We are getting our share but are definitely trying to increase the same. Some good orders are in the pipeline. We understand that T&R was actively planning to tap the European market. What is the current status? Tapping new business is ongoing process for any manufacturer. We have been focusing on European market for special duty industrial transformers and have achieved some success. Once these transformers are supplied and put into operation, customers will get more confidence in our product. It is a tough and cautious market. In a relatively short period of just over 20 years, T&R has grown impressively into the league of top transformer manufacturers in India. What are the core values that T&R has stood for and how do you see the road ahead? We are now at par with any other power transformer manufacturer as far as the range is concerned. We have always followed the principle of good quality at reasonable cost to the customer. This philosophy has paid off. Our transformers are considered at par with all major manufacturers. We will not deviate from our core values but will try to be more aggressive now. Our objective is to be preferred source of supply to any customer. TRANSFORMERS & RECTIFIERS (INDIA) LTD
  17. 17. T&D India December 201628 INTERVIEW Please explain in simple terms how CRGO steel ultimately finds its way in transformers. A transformer works on the principle of mutual inductance between two independent circuits linked by a common magnetic flux. The common magnetic flux is created by the core of the transformer which is made of cold rolled grain oriented steel or CRGO which is a very special kind of steel, with around 3.2 per cent of silicon content and where 97 per cent of the “grains” in the steel oriented (made facing) in the direction of rolling. CRGO is used in transformers because of its low-loss characteristic, which means that it generates less heat when magnetized, thereby increasing the efficiency of the transformer. CRGO steel comes in coils which have to be slit and cut to size to produce laminations of different shapes and sizes. These laminations are then bunched together to form a core. In simple terms, it is quite analogous to how notebooks are manufactured. A large roll of paper is taken and slit and then stacked together to make a notebook. A transformer core is very much like that except that instead of paper, you use CRGO steel. To what extent does the efficiency of the transformer depend on the quality of CRGO used? There are two kinds of losses in a transformer: load losses and no-load losses. Load losses, are due to copper and come into play only when there is load on the transformer. On the other hand, no-load losses are due to CRGO core and are continuously present, irrespective of whether there is a load or not. Both losses together comprise the total losses of a transformer. Therefore the efficiency of a transformer is directly related to the no-load losses (also known as core losses) of the transformer. The better the quality and grade of CRGO, the lower are the no-load losses and the better is the efficiency of the transformer. If second hand or bad quality of CRGO is used in the transformer, the transformer will be inefficient and the life of the transformer will be adversely impacted. KRYFS Power Components is renowned supplier of transformer laminations. company to have from PGCIL for 765kV power transformer laminations. In this exclusive exchange, Saif F. Qureishi gives crucial insights on everything one needs to know about CRGO— right from how it is used in transformers and why it is inextricably linked to the transformer industry. Qureishi is appreciative of the BIS strongly feels that India must move towards self-reliance in this critical raw material. An interaction by Venugopal Pillai. It is time India becomes self-reliant in CRGO — Saif F. Qureishi, CEO & MD, KRYFS Power Components Ltd. FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS
  18. 18. INTERVIEW T&D India December 201629 After the government mandated foreign CRGO suppliers to have their products BIS-certified, and knowing that most mills have already done so, do you think that the extent of scrap/inferior CRGO entering India has reduced? Yes, the extent of scrap and inferior CRGOhasreducedbutitisstillbeing imported through Kolkata, Chennai and other inland container yards in Punjab and NCR in collusion between some unscrupulous importers and customs officers. Due to this reason, used, seconds and defective CRGO is still available and is being used in transformers by many transformer manufacturers. This leads to poor quality of transformers being supplied in the country. It is learnt that some overseas are manufacturing transformers using scrap CRGO and this scrap is entering India as the imports qualify as “transformer parts” or “used transformers”. What is your view? Your information is absolutely correct. Second hand and defective CRGO users have set up shop in neighboring countries like Dubai, Nepal, Bangladesh, Thailand. Here, in trade free zones, they import scrap or defective CRGO and either process it or send it as it is to India, falsely declaring it as either “ melting scrap” through Kolkata port, or as “transformer parts” through Chennai port or “used transformers” through SEZs. Both IEEMA and ITMA have brought this to the notice of the authorities, however unfortunately the import of these seconds and defectives and scrap material still goes on unabated in this country, creating a disadvantage for those using prime material while the country getting supplied with sub-standard quality of transformers. At KRYFS how do you ensure that the CRGO that you are using is of prime grade? At KRYFS, we buy directly from the mills or their exclusive agents if the mill does not supply directly to India. We buy only prime BIS- certified material and therefore the quality of the products from our factory is always assured. This is the reason that we were the first company in India to be certified by Power Grid Corporation of India for the prestigious 765KV class transformer laminations. We have won several awards for export excellence as well as innovation. We are the only company that has a strategic investment from Toyota Tsusho Corporation, Japan, a Toyota group company that has a 20 per cent strategic stake in KRYFS. Has the BIS certification simplified matters? BIS has definitely standardized the nomenclature of the CRGO material being imported from different mills, and also standardized the losses across various grades being supplied by different mills. We find BIS implementation a move in the right direction which was required to have uniformity and quality in the material being used in transformers in India. India has not been able to produce CRGO locally despite “trying” for several decades. What is your reading of the situation? CRGO is produced by only 7 or 8 countries around the world and it is said that the production of CRGO is more an art than a science. It is a closely-guarded secret. India has tried: first through SAIL, then Raymond Steel, and finally ThyssenKrupp but has not succeeded in large scale production of CRGO. The quantity of CRGO being imported in India is more than 3 lakh tonnes per year and it is time that the country develops its own production to be independent of other countries producing this material. Without CRGO, transformers cannot be built and without transformers, electricity can neither be transmitted nor distributed. Besides, there is no other use of CRGO besides transformers. Therefore CRGO and transformers share a symbiotic relationship. Thus CRGO is integral part of India’s plans to provide 24x7 electricity for all and so it is imperative that we become self reliant in this important raw material. KRYFS POWER COMPONENTS LTD
  19. 19. T&D India December 201630 EXPERT VIEW What are the challenges in terms of design and manufacture of 1,200kV power transformers? Design of 1,200kV power transformers encompasses huge challenges with respect to dielectric, electromagnetic, thermal and short circuit conditions to assess or size the influence of active part. Dielectric design mainly consists of insulation design which is main criteria from the point of view of oil subdivided geometry. The main challenge is taking out of 1,200kV lead exits by providing suitable moulded components. Advanced knowledge is desired in magnetic field distribution for electro-magnetic field analysis (i.e. penetration of flux with metallic parts such as clamping structure and tank, which can be controlled with clamp shields, tank shields etc,) to estimate the stray losses of live parts as well as the earth-parts. Thermal design includes design of cooling system and estimation of hot spot. The velocity of oil entry into the active part needs to be designed so that electrostatic surface discharges by streaming electrification do not occur in the path of oil flow within the insulation and windings. So, the sizing of cooling pumps and oil path in the active part poses a challenge in design. Design of short circuit withstand forcescanbeaddressedusingspecial enamelled conductors with low chip epoxy bonding, proper radial and axial supports in winding and using of rigid clamping structure. When it comes to manufacturing of UHV transformers, each process (core assembly, winding assembly, active part assembly, final assembly, etc) requires clean and controlled atmosphere. During manufacturing Part of the Toshiba Group, Toshiba Transmission & Distribution India Pvt Ltd (TTDI) was formed in late 2013 when Toshiba acquired controlling stake in Vijai Electricals Ltd—a Hyderabad- based company that was amongst the few suppliers of 1,200kV transformers to the Bina UHVAC test transmission line. In this exchange, we have Dr Katsutoshi Toda giving insights into the design and manufacture of 1,200kV power transformers, whilst discussing important issues in the 1,200kV (UHVAC) power transmission regime. Designing 1,200kV transformers can pose huge challenges — Dr Katsutoshi Toda, Chairman & Managing Director, Toshiba Transmission & Distribution India Pvt Ltd FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS Inside view of TTDI’s Hyderabad manufacturing facility
  20. 20. EXPERT VIEW T&D India December 201631 stage, it has to be ensured that all sharp edges are adequately shielded including the hardware. These points are prone to insulation to initiate partial discharge in the transformer. Maintaining of moisture free insulation in UHV transformers will be a major challenge during vapour drying process. Very fine NAS level of oil filtration is required to remove suspended particles which if unremoved shall become a potential for charging tendency so by initiating partial discharge. When it comes to testing of extra high-voltage equipment, India does not have sufficient facilities. What would be the role of overseas testing labs? Today selected manufacturing industries in India are already geared up for doing all dielectric and thermal testing of 1,200kV. With National High Power Test Laboratory (NHPTL) coming up at Bina in Madhya Pradesh, it would be great source of support to industry for performing testing, which are not available in the other manufacturing industries. So the role of KEMA, CESI shall be limited with the upcoming of National Test facility within India. Apart from transformers, what other critical equipment would be required for 1,200kV power transmission? UHV reliable circuit breakers, UHV surge arrestor and its housing, UHV instrument transformers (capacitor voltage transformers or CVTs) and current transformers (CTs)), UHV insulators (line insulator strings, polymeric long rod insulators and substation insulators), bundle conductors, hardware, clamps and connections, tower structure and UHVAC transmission line would be required for operating of the substation. Installation of transmission line towers should ensure robust and high quality levels in challenging topographical conditions. What are the challenges in setting up of 1,200kV power transmission infrastructure on the commercial scale? The main challenges are: Transmission line by right of way as it needs greater amount of clearance. The extent of effect of 1,200kV transmission line is under study on environment at experiment test lab at Bina and recommendations coming out of this study shall need to be considered particularly during the positioning of the transmission line. Transportation of these large jobs on the road to the various destinations shall be very challenging as all routes and bridges are not sustainable to such heavy weight. Reinforcement and strengthening of roads and bridges shall be an issue that shall be needed to be taken up with ministry of road transport and highways. Sustainability and dimensioning of tower for 1,200kV shall need to be studied especially for difficult terrain areas, looking at the effect of wind, snow deposit, etc. Trained man power, technique, infrastructure required for erection & commissioning of such high voltages shall also need to be addressed. The components desired for this kind of equipments are mostly imported and hence developing vendors in India to supply the desired quality will be an additional challenge. Government should look into indigenisation of components by supporting national suppliers and minimize the import of components from foreign countries. What has been the role so far of Toshiba T&D India in the 1,200kV test line at Bina? TTDI has taken the first initiative to complete the design and developmentof1,200kVtransformer on priority. The transformer supplied by TTDI was connected to 1,200kV first batch test line and successfully commissioned in May 2012. The performance of the transformer so far is satisfactory and is being monitored closely. How does Toshiba T&D India view the market for 1,200kV equipment and how is it preparing itself for the upcoming demand? In addition to the existing 765kV transmission network in India, it is foreseen that due to large rating of power plants (hydro, thermal and nuclear) long transmission lines for upgrade of grid may be required. Considering the requirement of heavy evacuation of power in near future, there is much scope for 1,200kV equipment. A 1,200kV interconnecting transmission scheme between Raigarh-Raipur and Raipur–Wardha–Aurangabad is being planned to commercialize in the XIV Plan period. TTDI has established manufacturing hub in India. In UHV, TTDI has invested Rs.1 billion towards new winding shop assembly with controlled atmosphere in the areas of core building, winding assembly, active part assembly and testing facilities in line with the future market of UHV in India. TOSHIBA TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION INDIA PVT LTD An overview of the Bina UHVAC test station
  21. 21. T&D India December 2016 INSIGHT 32 t is a basic principle of electromagnetic induction that an electric current flows in a closed coil placed within a varying magneticfield.Thiscurrentproduces a secondary magnetic field in its own turn. The two magnetic fields repel each other and consequently the conductors in the coil experience a force that is proportional to the product of the two field strengths. In a transformer, the principal magnetic field is itself set up by the flow of current in the primary coil. The secondary current, and therefore the secondary magnetic field, is proportional to the primary current. Therefore the forces mutually experienced by the coils are proportional to the square of either current. This means that under short-circuit conditions, the forces experienced by the windings are two orders of magnitude higher than at rated currents. In core type transformers, these forces act radially, tending to compress a coil and reduce its axial length. In shell type constructions the forces act at a perpendicular to the coil surface and tend to reduce its radial width. FAILURE MODES If a power transformer is not designed and built properly, external short-circuits can cause significant weakening of its active parts, thus reducing its reliability, even if there is no immediate internal breakdown. Conductors can displace and stretch, coils can distort, bulge, buckle, telescope, tilt or rupture leading to broken insulation and thus to inter- turn short-circuits. Mechanical failures of the insulation can occur due to motion between conductors and spacers. Winding end supports can collapse. DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING PRACTICE Of the many elements that go into the design and manufacture of power transformers in order to improve their short-circuit withstand capabilities, the choice of conductor material is the most important, as its mechanical properties, such as yield strength and modulus of elasticity, are critical to performance. For this reason, good design practices, such as those of ABB, use copper with a minimum yield strength of 90 N/mm2 at 0.2% offset (in other words it would require a stress greater than 90 N/mm2 to cause a permanent strain of 0.2%). This figure goes as high as 280 N/ mm2 and beyond for heavy-duty transformers with frequent short- circuits such as those used for arc furnaces. The use of the right grade of copper is considered by good designers as the best way of ensuringhighshort-circuitwithstand capability in power transformers. IMPROVING TRANSFORMER ENERGY PERFORMANCE Higher copper content in transformers improves energy performance and consequently lowers lifecycle costs in most cases. The various costs incurred during the long life of a transformer can be broadly categorized into purchase, operating and end-of-life costs. Of these, the operating costs – principally comprising the cost of energy losses in the transformer – are dominant. Therefore the astute purchaser will give a high weightage to the transformer’s energy performance in his decisions and will not base these on direct costs alone. Transformer designers have a mix of options available for improving energy performance – principally the use of larger core and conductor cross-sections, or a lower loss core material, or a better conductor, i.e. copper. The optimization of this mix is done on an ongoing basis by designers and manufacturers, based on relative material costs at the given time and the specific conditions of procurement on energy performance. This is the reason for the variety of transformer designs seen in the market. REFERENCES 1.Short Circuit Duty of Power Transformers: GiorgoBertagnolli 2.State of the Art on the Use of Copper and Aluminium Conductors in Distribution Transformers Manufacturing: R. Salustiano & M. L. B. Martínez Federal University of Itajubá– Lat- Efei. [Manas Kundu is Director, Energy Solutions at International Copper Association, India.] Copper: Material of choice for power transformer conductors I If a power transformer is not designed and built properly, external short-circuits can its active parts, thus reducing its reliability, even if there is no FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS MANAS KUNDU
  22. 22. T&D India December 201634 India urgently needs short-circuit testing facilities for high-voltage transformers In this brief interaction with T&D India, Dr. M.K. Shah gives a quick overview on the testing facilities available with ERDA when it comes to high voltage transformers. India’s power transmission is moving to the EHV regime with wide deployment of even 765kV equipment. Currently, India has short-circuit testing facilities for power transformers up to 220kV only. This is proving debilitating as it means incurring heavy expenses in availing testing facilities overseas, notes Dr. Shah. — Dr. M.K. Shah, Director, ERDA Currently, what types of testing facilities are available with ERDA when it comes to HV/EHV transformers? ERDA has high voltage impulse testing facilities for up to 400kV transformers at both its Makarpura and Savli laboratories at Vadodara. However, short-circuit testing of transformers are limited up to 4MVA, 33kV transformers at its Savli laboratory at Vadodara. Apart from these ERDA has transformer oil testing, insulating material testing, CRGO testing facilities up to any voltage level. ERDA Vadodara and Rabale (Navi Mumbai) laboratories are BIS-certified for mandatory type testing of distribution transformers as per IS: 1180-2014 What new capabilities are being planned at ERDA labs for testing of HV/EHV transformers? ERDA is planning to set up a Centre of Excellence for R&D in medium voltage switchgear and transformer at its Makarpura, Vadodara Laboratory complex. This facility will allow short- circuit testing of medium voltage switchgear up to 36kV, 31.5kA and transformers up to 132kV, 50 MVA in first phase. It is expected that the project will be initiated in the next financial year (2017-18) and it will take approximately three years to complete. To what extent are Indian transformer manufacturers dependent on the services of foreign labs—KEMA and CESI— for instance for testing of HV/EHV transformers? Currently in India, short-circuit testing facility of power transformers is limited to 220kV, 160MVA. This facility is not sufficient to meet the testing requirement of Indian manufacturers and utilities. PGCIL and NTPC insist on short-circuit test report of power transformers even up to 400kV. This testing facility is presently not available in India and Indian manufacturers have to bear lot of expenses and time to get such transformers tested at KEMA in Netherlands or CESI in Italy. As per a market survey conducted byERDA,Indianmanufacturersspent Rs.30 crore each year type testing of electrical equipment abroad. However, National High Power Test Laboratory at Bina is setting up High Voltage Transformer Testing (HVTR) Lab to test large power transformers of 132kV, 220kV, 400kV and 765kV class and another medium voltage transformer testing (MVTR Lab) lab to test the transformers of 11kV to 66 kV class. Phase-I is expected to be commissioned shortly. How important would be adequate testing infrastructure for transformers in view of India’s “Power for All” agenda? CEA had recommended short circuit testing of transformers mandatory vide its regulations 2010 to ensure reliable power supply in the country. But this regulation could not be implemented due to limitation of short-circuit testing facilities in India. Hence it is imperative to set up another short circuit testing facility for transformers in India to ensure Government of India’s target to provide “Reliable 24x7 Power for All” by 2019. ERDA is committed to provide additional transformer short circuit testing facility to Indian manufacturers and utilities. n Q+A FOCUS: TRANSFORMERS ERDA has estimated that Indian transformer manufacturers spend around Rs.30 crore per year in testing their high-voltage transformers at foreign laboratories. Onsite testing of power transformers by ERDA
  23. 23. GLOBAL SNIPPETS Siemens and the New York startup LO3 Energy are collaborating in the field of innovative microgrids. The goal of the collaboration is to jointly develop microgrids that enable local energy trading based on blockchain technology. Siemens is involving its next47 unit, which was established in October 2016 as part of an ecosystem for partnerships with startups to take a leading role in the evolving decentralized energy system market. As a startup, LO3 Energy is currently supported by Siemens Digital Grid and next47, in developing a solution for a blockchain-based microgrid in the New York borough of Brooklyn – the first of its kind in the world and a starting point for developing other joint microgrid projects in US and other countries. Blockchain technology is an innovative method of storing and validating data that permits direct transactions between energyproducersandconsumers.Transactions are trackable and tamper-proof on distributed systems without the need for centralized monitoring, a release from Siemens said. Prysmian Group has announced that it has won a bankruptcy auction for certain assets of a HV cables factory in China previously operated by Shen Huan Cable Technologies for total consideration of around 305 million RMB (around 42 million euros), plus taxes in the region of 4 million euros. This acquisition will be carried out by Prysmian Technology Jiangsu Co Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Group’s holding company in China, Prysmian China Investment Co. Ltd. Once the acquisition is completed, Prysmian Technology Jiangsu will be able to count on manufacturing and logistics facilities consisting of an area of more than 190,000 sqm and five production lines, with a production capacity of over 20,000 tonnes per year, a Prysmian release said. The business formerly known as Emerson Network Power has announced the appointment of Rob Johnson as CEO and officially commenced a campaign to rebrand the standalone company as Vertiv. Vertiv is a global provider of mission-critical infrastructure technologies for vital applications in data centers, communication networks, and commercial and industrial environments. The company, which is headquartered in Columbus, Ohio (USA), has more than 20,000 employees and more than 25 manufacturing and assembly facilities worldwide. Platinum Equity acquired the business from Emerson in a transaction valued in excess of $4 billion. Amprion and Elia have signed up with the winning contractor Siemens who will deliver the two HVDC converter stations for the first electricity interconnector between Germany and Belgium. The order volume for Siemens including a five-year maintenance agreement amounts to 273 million euros. The German transmission system operator Amprion and the Belgian counterpart Elia join forces to deliver the Aachen Liège Electricity Grid Overlay (ALEGrO) that will connect the Belgian and German HV electricity systems using a 90-km underground cable. DeepOcean 1 UK Ltd, a subsidiary of DeepOcean Group Holding BV, has announced the award of cable installation and trenching work for DONG Energy’s Hornsea Project One offshore wind farm. DeepOcean’s scope is the installation and trenching of 93 array cables. T&D India December 201635
  24. 24. T&D India December 201636 NEW LAUNCHES Pharox Streak Pro Batten NTL Lemnis has launched an inno- vative product “Pharox Streak Pro Batten”, an ideal replacement for conventional tube light with an in- tegrated driver. Its unique and slim design provides hassle free instal- lation process, a product note from NTL Lemnis said. Pharox Streak Pro Batten is a powerful tube light with aesthetically pleasing design, which is maintenance free and eco- friendly. The tube light is backed by the reliable and eco-friendly LED technology and is a perfect solu- tion for different installations like residential, indoor, commercial and production plants. Pharox Streak Pro Batten stands out from its cotemporaries because of its unique features, the release added. Prototyping boards from Microchip Two new low-cost rapid prototyp- ing boards for 32-bit applications are now available from Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions. The PIC32MX and PIC32MZ Curios- ity Boards include an integrated programmer debugger and are fully incorporated into Microchip’s MPLAB X integrated development environment (IDE). The boards are designed for de- veloping 32-bit applications and feature a wide range of peripherals as well as user interface and expan- sion options including two mikro- BUS™ click interface headers to support over 180 MikroElectronika Click Boards™. Both boards offer a rich feature set at an affordable price and are designed to be con- nected and used right out-of-the box, a release from Microchip said. Automation cables from Nexans Nexans has launched the new MO- TIONLINE® HALEX cable series, a range of halogen-free flexible au- tomation cables for industrial appli- cations. In the past, operators who needed halogen-free (PVC-free) ca- bles could only choose PUR cables, which offer outstanding mechanical performance but are significantly more expensive than PVC-sheathed cables. Nexans is now offering an alternative that not only is flexible, robust, drag-chain-capable and flame-retardant, but also entails low additional costs compared with PVC cables. Nexans’ HALEX cables do not contain halogens and, like PUR cables, are flame-retardant. In contrast to PVC, they do not release any highly toxic or irritant gases in the event of a fire. The sheath per- mits small bending radii (at least 2 million cycles at 10xD) and is re- sistant to abrasion, oil and cooling lubricants, a release from Nexans said. Siemens 800A switch disconnector With its 3KF product range, Sie- mens has developed new switch disconnectors with fuses for cur- rents up to 800A. Together with the switch disconnectors from the 3KD series that are capable of switching currents up to 1600 A, Siemens now covers virtually the entire product spectrum for low-voltage power dis- tribution with its Sentron portfolio. The modular compact devices are suitable both for AC applications such as industrial plants, buildings and wind power, as well as for DC environments. Switch disconnectors safely protect users against electri- cal accidents during maintenance and installation work in switchgear cubicles. If necessary, padlocks can be used to lock the front panel or side panel mounted operating mechanisms. These prevent unau- thorized switching and provide ad- ditional protection. Siemens offers the switches in five sizes, which are all available in three- and four-pole versions. They conform to standard IEC 60947-3 for low-voltage switch- gear and the equipment-specific EC directives for product safety. Prototyping boards from Automation cables from Siemens 800A switch
  25. 25. T&D India December 201637 POWER EQUIPMENT eyveli Uttar Pradesh Power Ltd (NUPPL), a 51:49 joint venture between NLC India Ltd (formerly Neyveli Lignite Corporation Ltd) and state power utility Uttar Pradesh Rajya Vidyut Utpadan Nigam (UPRVUNL) has placed major orders worth nearly Rs.9,000 crore for its upcoming Ghatampur power project in Uttar Pradesh. Coming up in Ghatampur in Kanpur Nagar district, the power plant will be equipped with three supercritical coal-fired power generation units of 660-mw each. The power plant will come up on 828 ha of land, all of which is under NUPPL’s possession. The order for boilers (steam generators) and auxiliaries has gone to L&T-MHPS Boilers Pvt Ltd, a joint venture between L&T India and Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems of Japan. The order (package GA1) is valued at Rs.3,850 crore. Another Rs.2,302-crore order (package GA2) for turbine-generators and parts has been awarded to Alstom Bharat Forge Power Pvt Ltd. The balance-of-plant works have been contracted to Chennai-headquartered BGR Energy Systems Ltd. This contract (termed as package GA3) is valued at Rs.2,789 crore. It is learnt that one more package (GA4) for flue-gas desulphurization is pending award. The Ghatampur project represents NLC’s diversification into coal-based power generation. The first unit of the project is scheduled to commission by around March 2021, while the entire power project will be operational by March 2022. For fuel supplies, the coal ministry had allocated the Pachwara South Coal block in Jharkhand to NUPPL. However, due to law and order problems, mining activities could not be undertaken and it is now learnt that NUPPL has entered into an agreement with MSTC Ltd to import coal for the project. In an independent development, Alstom Bharat Forge Power Pvt Ltd, the TG-set supplier to the Ghatampur power project, might soon lose its joint venture status. Bharat Forge, the 49 per cent stakeholder in the JV, has planned to divest its entire stake for a consideration of $35 million (around Rs.230 crore) to GE Pacific Pvt Ltd. Alstom, it may be recalled, has already been acquired by GE. The JV was formed in 2009 and it has its manufacturing facility at Sanand in Gujarat. Bharat Forge has so far made an investment of Rs.170 in the JV and the move to sell its stake is aimed at paring its outstanding debt. NLC in Rajasthan: In a related development, Reliance Infrastructure Ltd’s (RInfra) EPC Division has won an EPC order for Rs.3,675 crore (Rs.2,302 crore plus $205 million) from NLC India Ltd for setting up two lignite- based CFBC (circulating fluidized bed combustion) thermal power projects of capacity 250-mw each, in Barsingsar and Bithnok of Bikaner district in Rajasthan. The contract entails complete EPC on turnkey basis of two 250-mw power plant based on CFBC technology. The project is to be commissioned in 40 months, and will include boiler, turbine & generator and balance of plant. RInfra won the bid amidst stiff competition against leading EPC players. In a communication to stock exchanges, Reliance Infrastructure said that contenders in the fray included BHEL, Lanco, SEPCO-I, SEPCO-III and BGR Energy. N Major orders for Ghatampur power plant placed File photo showing groundbreaking ceremony of Ghatampur power project that took place on October 20, 2016.
  26. 26. December 201638T&D India S E T R U MPS C
  27. 27. December 201639T&D India ADVERTISE IN Your cost-effective tool to reach out to power T&D stakeholders. Contact: Hemant Kumar T:+91(22)62216615 E: hemant.kumar@tndindia.com S E C T R U MPS S E T R U MPS C
  28. 28. December 201638T&D India S E T R U MPS C
  29. 29. December 201639T&D India ADVERTISE IN Your cost-effective tool to reach out to power T&D stakeholders. Contact: Hemant Kumar T:+91(22)62216615 E: hemant.kumar@tndindia.com S E C T R U MPS S E T R U MPS C
  30. 30. T&D India December 201640 General Electric Company (GE) – the sole licensor for Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd’s supercritical technology – has been awarded a con- tract worth Rs.270 crore to supply two 800-mw supercritical boilers (steam generators) for the Telangana supercritical power project. The two boilers are expected to be commissioned by 2020. Located in Karimnagar district of Telangana, the power project is owned by Telangana State Power Generation Company Ltd (TSGENCO). This power utility, in June 2015, had named BHEL as the EPC contractor for the 5x800-mw power plant, with an estimated contract value of be noted that out of the total order value of Rs.270 crore, placed on be around Rs.180 crore. Under the overall contract, GE will design commissioning of the boilers. Key components of the pressure parts West Bengal. The transmission & distribution business of has reported the winning of Rs.723 crore worth of overseas orders includ- ing a 275kV transmission line in Malaysia (valued at Rs.429 crore) and a turnkey order for a 500kV overhead line in Egypt (Rs.248 crore.) Besides, the cables business has landed supply orders to the Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd value to supply industrial motors destined to Togo and Benin – two - plied by BHEL’s Bhopal unit in Madhya Pradesh. has announced the winning of a 40-mw wind power project 113m rotor diameter 2-mw turbines at a site in Gujarat. The contract also involves long-term operations and maintenance. has won an order valued at Rs.96 and 19 power transformers up to 110kV class that will be deployed taken T&R’s outstanding order book position (as of November 23, 2016) to Rs.980 crore, the company said. - single management. The company moves more than 12,500 trains - formers for the 800 locomotives. Traction transformers feed power at safe voltages to essential train functions like traction, brakes, lighting, heating and ventilation, as well as passenger information, signaling and communication, the release said. has announced the landing of an order for a 50.40-mw wind power project from an unnamed business house. The project consists of 24 units of S95 90m tubular tower with rated capac- the project is scheduled for completion in March 2017. This order win takes the total current year order portfolio with the said business ReNew Power has placed a 50-mw turnkey project order on Gamesa, - tract, Gamesa will supply 25 units of G114 – 2.0mw T106 turbines - ect, Gamesa will handle the entire infrastructure needed to install and operate the facility, the company said in a release. Paradip Port Trust has placed an EPC contract on Surana Solar Ltd (formerly Surana Ventures Ltd) for design, engineering, procurement, supply, construction and erection, testing, commissioning and asso- ciated transmission works for a 10-mw solar power plant at Paradip Port, Odisha. The value of the contract is Rs.60.60 crore, which is subsequent development, Surana Solar also announced the winning - ergy Pvt Ltd, a subsidiary of Surana Solar, for the supply of 5 mw worth of solar modules. has announced its maiden order win for 63 mw from The order comprises installation of 30 units of S97 120m hybrid tow- er with a rated capacity of 2.1 mw each. The project will be located at be completed by March 2017. ORDERS & CONTRACTS Overview of ABB’s Vadodara facility for traction transformers used in metro and railways.
  31. 31. PHOTO NEWS T&D India December 201641 BB India recently commissioned a hillside 400/220kV substation in the southern Himalaya range of Uttarakhand to evacuate hydroelectric power from the region and integrate it into the national grid. Tomeettherisingenergyneedsofthehillystate,PowerTransmission Corporation of Uttarakhand Ltd (PTCUL) awarded ABB India a contract to construct a transmission substation in Khandukhal, Uttarakhand. The remote site and hilly terrain required innovative solutions and careful planning to master the challenges of moving heavy equipment and arranging the substation on uneven grounds. The transport to site of equipment such as transformers weighing up to 120 tonnes reinforcement of roads and the connecting bridge at Khandukhal, a release from ABB India said. Accommodating the air-insulated switchgear (AIS) substation on and the lowest points was facilitated by a customized approach to design and structure. The solution included spreading the equipment across 25 tiers with walls up to 12m high and 2m wide to stabilize the tiers of the terraced substation. As part of the turnkey contract, ABB India designed, supplied, installed and commissioned the 400/220kV substation including switchgear, power transformers as well as a reactor. Reactors are used for reactive power compensation, helping to increase energy with IEC 61850-compliant automation, protection and communication systems to enable local and remote monitoring and control of all substation assets, the release said. A ACHIEVEMENT Terraced substation in Khandukhal, Uttarakhand The AIS substation was built across 25 tiers with 34m difference in elevation The solution included spreading the equipment across 25 tiers with walls up to 12m high and 2m wide to stabilize the tiers of the terraced substation. ABB commissions substation in hilly terrain of Uttarakhand ABB commissions substation in hilly terrain of Uttarakhand T&D India December 201641
  32. 32. T&D India December 201642 SHORT TAKES ADVERTISERS’ INDEX Adinath Extrusion Pvt Ltd 5 Anand Engineering Corpration 38 Atlas Filtration Services 35 Cast And Coap 38 Electro Care (India) Pvt.Ltd. 39 Elektra Precisioion Systems 38 Evergreen Metal Works Bangalore 37 Gurud Industries 38 INTELECT 2017 21 International Copper Association India 9 KVTEK Power Systems Pvt Ltd 15 M & I Materials India Pvt Ltd 7 Mahati Industries Pvt Ltd 44 (BC) Mathura Switchgears Pvt Ltd 39 Myriad Industrial Solutions LLP 38 Neutronics Manufacturing Company 38 Om Indutries 38 Precision Wires India Ltd 2 (IFC) R R Enterprises 38 Reliserv Solutions 39 Shree NM Unilog Industricals Supplies Pvt. Ltd 13 Slimlites Electricals Pvt Ltd 43 (IBC) Spark Electrosystems 39 State Enterprises 35 Supreme Electroplast Industries 39 Trafosem 2017 33 Trak Enterprises 39 Transpower India Electronics Pvt Ltd 11 Transtron Electricals Pvt Ltd 17 Urja Infratech & Power Projects (I) Pvt. Ltd 39 Yash High Voltage Insulators Pvt Ltd 3
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