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Unleashing Potential: Talent Management and Career Development Strategies for Your Team and You

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Unleashing Potential: Talent Management and Career Development Strategies for Your Team and You

This presentation was shared by Vanessa Theoharis and Julie Ried at the American Marketing Association Higher Education Symposium in November 2022.

The market has gone through a whirlwind of a year, as individuals contemplate the next stages of their career journeys, whether within the organization or elsewhere. As higher education leaders, you have the opportunity to create a workplace environment that will attract top talent, engage your team and motivate individuals to stay.

Bringing best practices from across the field, this presentation includes strategies around employee recruitment, retention, and engagement, specifically for marketing and communications teams.

This presentation was shared by Vanessa Theoharis and Julie Ried at the American Marketing Association Higher Education Symposium in November 2022.

The market has gone through a whirlwind of a year, as individuals contemplate the next stages of their career journeys, whether within the organization or elsewhere. As higher education leaders, you have the opportunity to create a workplace environment that will attract top talent, engage your team and motivate individuals to stay.

Bringing best practices from across the field, this presentation includes strategies around employee recruitment, retention, and engagement, specifically for marketing and communications teams.

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Unleashing Potential: Talent Management and Career Development Strategies for Your Team and You

  1. 1. Unleashing Potential: Talent Management and Career Development Strategies for Your Team – and You! AMA HIGHER ED | NOVEMBER 2022 #AMAHIGHERED 1 THE WARD GROUP Julie Ried – jried@wardgroup.com Vanessa Theoharis – vtheoharis@wardgroup.com
  2. 2. Julie Ried Vice President  25 years of experience in marketing and communications and joined The Ward Group in 2005  Grown and led the higher education and non-profit practice areas  Beyond higher education, has successfully managed searches in healthcare, museums, and health and human services organizations  Previously held roles at The Advertising Club of Greater Boston and at agencies in marketing, account management, and business development with clients in consumer brands, technology, and financial services  Has served on the AMA Higher Ed Steering Committee and spoken on marketing and communications and how to evaluate and attract “best in class” talent to disruptive and growing categories Vanessa Theoharis Director  15 years of integrated marketing experience and joined The Ward Group in 2021  Previously consulted with clients in higher education and nonprofit institutions to develop integrated marketing solutions that leveraged marketing technology to unlock business value and data to drive decisions  Before joining TWG, built and led the digital marketing business line at the digital agency OHO Interactive, and prior to that, directed all College-wide digital and content initiatives as a member of the marketing leadership team at Babson College  Has spoken at dozens of higher ed conferences and summits, including AMA Higher Ed 2 A retained executive search and consulting firm specializing in senior-level positions in marketing and communications.
  3. 3. Agenda for Today’s Workshop 1. Introductions and Your Goals 2. Recruit 3. Engage 4. Retain 5. Wrap-Up 1:1 Confidential 10-Minute Conversations with Julie or Vanessa 3 Recruit Engage Retain
  4. 4. Introductions  Introduce yourselves in small groups of 5.  Discuss: What is your primary goal for this workshop?  Pick one representative to share out to the larger group. 4
  5. 5. Recruit 5
  6. 6. Recruitment in Today’s Market  The power dynamic has switched from employer to employees/candidates, due in part to increased labor needs, stagnant growth in the working age population, and the evolution of benefits and workplace models.  Therefore, candidates are in demand and have lots of opportunities, including at their current organization.  More than ever, employers must be creative about the true employee value proposition and ‘total rewards.’ 6 https://warrenaverett.com/insights/staffing-and-recruiting
  7. 7. Employees want to… 1. Feel valued. 2. Feel a sense of belonging among caring and trusted colleagues. 3. See the potential to grow. 4. Have the flexibility to integrate work with their personal lives. 7 How to Attract Top Talent in 2022, Harvard Business Review
  8. 8. Attracting Top Talent Leaders know the term “employee value proposition,” or EVP: what employees get for what they give. “Gives” come in many flavors—time, effort, experience, ideas. “Gets” include tangible rewards, the experience of working in a company, the way its leadership helps employees, and the substance of the work. If your EVP is truly stronger than the competition’s, you will attract and retain the best talent. 8 Attracting and retaining the right talent, McKinsey
  9. 9. Attracting the Right Talent 1. Alignment around a detailed job description that is focused. 2. Define core competencies. 3. Select only a few top criteria (and weight them, if possible). 4. Evaluate against the competencies and criteria along the way. 9
  10. 10. Filling the Funnel Become an active participant in promoting positions – and, have your team do the same. Educate, educate, educate your HR partner on the function. Be open-minded and creative when evaluating candidates. 10
  11. 11. Positioning the Employer Brand During the Hiring Process What is the market perception of your institution by prospective employees?  What’s the Market Saying?: Recruiters and phone screeners should take note of how the organization is perceived to help influence employer brand strategies and engagement through the recruitment process.  Everyone Tells the Story: Everyone involved in the hiring process is responsible for contributing to the story of the institution as an employer, including its mission, culture, and benefits.  Know the Total Rewards: The hiring manager, more than ever, must be generally knowledgeable of the benefits package and costs associated.  LinkedIn to Promote the Org: LinkedIn profiles are a great way to publicly communicate the organization culture and the department dynamics to prospective employees. 11
  12. 12.  How are new ideas or perspectives received?  How do decisions get made?  Why do you enjoy working at the institution, and what motivates you to stay?  How will success be measured - for this person and their team?  What are the qualities of successful leaders at the organization?  From your perspective “Why now?” What would you say is the biggest opportunity for this new team member?  What is the biggest challenge that this person will face?  How would you describe the current culture and climate at the institution and/or in the department? 12 Common Candidate Questions Gain consensus across the team before the hiring process even begins by answering these key questions about the culture and the opportunity.
  13. 13. Core Competencies  Aligning core competencies to each role offer an evaluation framework and standard of excellence.  Leveraging competencies during the interview process create depth to your assessment. These should then be referenced during performance management throughout an employee’s tenure. 13 https://blog.hrtrove.com/beyond-skills-why-competencies-are-important-as-your-organization-grows
  14. 14. 14 BUSINESS LITERACY COMMUNICATION RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT Ability to understand take the business vision and translate it into project vision. Ability to produce clear written reports, communicate tactfully and candidly, simplify jargon, make clients aware of all issues, be an excellent listener. Ability to consult and provide advice; to facilitate discussion and resolve conflict; to develop relationships with key stakeholders; to establish trust, credibility and respect. STRATEGIC THINKING QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROBLEM-SOLVING Ability to analyze the future impact of decisions; to strategically position the project within the business to relate to short and long-term objectives. Understand how to obtain and ensure quality results (or products) for total satisfaction, ability to take corrective actions and perform verification of project standards, effectively. Ability to find the right solution to the right problem. Exhibits strong critical thinking skills. PROJECT SCOPE DEFINITION TECHNICAL COMPETENCE TEAM VISION-SETTING Ability to establish a clear scope; what's in, what's out, and create approval procedures. Has strong analytical ability as defined by areas of functional expertise. Develops and follows a shared vision and follows that vision. Establishes partner roles, functions, and responsibilities. INITIATIVE ORGANIZATION GOAL ORIENTATION Seizes opportunity to improve performance and advance goals. Identifies immediate action needed to address current issues. Ability to prioritize workload, manage time, and optimize resources. Work is executed effectively and delivered on time. Demonstrated results-oriented working style. Uses quantifiable behavior in the achievement of short and long-term goals. SENSE OF URGENCY ATTENTION TO DETAIL DISCIPLINE Ability to anticipate a need, understand it is important to success, and carry out the appropriate action to resolve it. Accomplishes tasks efficiently, thoroughly, and with accuracy. Pays special attention to all areas involved in deliverables to minimize likelihood or errors. Monitors and checks work or information. Steady, even pace of work to ensure accuracy and quality, completion of tasks before new ones are begun, and focus within established systems, standards, and procedures. DECISION-MAKING TEAMWORK ADAPTABILITY Uses sound judgment to make good decisions based on information gathered and Ability to effectively work with others toward a common vision. Shares and receives
  15. 15. Activity!  Using a master list of possible core competencies, discuss interview questions that would align.  Report out to the larger group. 15
  16. 16. Engage 16
  17. 17. Employee Engagement The best workplace is the one that cares for its employees and then positions employee engagement as the catalyst for improving important business outcomes. (Gallup) 1. Survey often (pulse checks and annual deep-dives) 2. Have growth-oriented conversations 3. Provide clear, ongoing communication 4. Focus on wellbeing 5. Have strengths-based conversations 17 https://www.gallup.com/workplace/388685/2022-employee-engagement-guide.aspx
  18. 18. Identify Personal Professional Goals Short and long-term goals Consider both tactical and aspirational Should align to departmental strategic vision and plan 18
  19. 19. Professional Development  Trainings: Upskill your team to support their own development and add continued value to team skillsets. Analytics, design, writing, etc.  Bringing an individual in for a tailored workshop.  Online training sources (ex. LinkedIn, Udemy, Skillshare, Coursera)  Being Creative with Tight Budgets:  Have internal cross-training by specialists or experts.  If send team members to conferences/courses, include requirement to teach colleagues learnings.  Think Outside Higher Ed:  Consider brands that engage consumers, or even your agency. 19
  20. 20. Developing Strategic Capabilities We hear this often – elevating roles to contribute to strategy development is a common desire. But, the individual needs to be trained on how this process works. How can you incorporate more team members in strategic planning processes?  Include in senior-level meetings, even as observers.  Bring strategic planning components back to the team for their questions and contributions.  If you’re not involved in the conversations, then ask to be! Even as an observer. Be proactive to gain exposure. 20
  21. 21. Personality Assessments Personality assessments help uncover individual’s work style and work preferences, with the goal of minimizing the guess-work when building and maintaining productive working relationships.  Consider conducting during the hiring process to help influence interview questions.  Share with the team and cross-functional partners.  Use as a team engagement exercise.  For managers, having this data is incredibly helpful in coaching conversations. Some of our favorites… 21 HBDI Strengths Finder Predictive Index Kolbe DiSC The Enneagram
  22. 22. Onboarding and Orientation Onboarding is a critical transition period where you can take advantage of time and opportunities. The first 90 days makes or breaks an individual’s success at the organization.  Go beyond the HR new employee orientation.  Continue to reinforce core competencies.  Establish a mentor/buddy relationship for the new candidate. 22
  23. 23. Onboarding and Orientation  Pre-Start  Announce the New Hire to the Organization  Inform the New Hire of Company Details  Designate a Mentor  Week One  Connect the New Hire with Peers and Team (Direct and Indirect)  Get Social with an Informal Welcome Gathering  Within 45 Days  Finalize Goals  Reevaluate What’s Working, What Needs Attention, and How to Improve  Enhance Relationships  Within 90 Days  New Hire Develops a Written Review 23 https://www.wardgroup.com/twg-blog/a-guide-for-managers
  24. 24. Onboarding and Orientation  Do Your Research  Connect, Connect, Connect. (in- person or video)  Have Courage.  Give Yourself Grace 24 https://www.wardgroup.com/twg-blog/a-guide-for-new-hires
  25. 25. Sample 30, 60, 90 Assimilation Template 25 The 30,60,90 is a tool to bring a new hire through their first 90 days. It allows both the employee and manager to agree to expectations and work of the job/department. Once form is reviewed with the employee, the Manager must send to the employee a copy for their records. Employee must acknowledge receipt and confirmation of the document.
  26. 26. Rewarding and Recognizing Rewarding and recognizing employees is a proven way to demonstrate appreciation for excellent contribution and strong performance. It is critical to provide positive reinforcement. But, employees may prefer to be recognized in different ways. Could be small celebration, changed title, public recognition, increased responsibilities, or financial reward. So, ask! 26 https://www.tinypulse.com/blog/19-creative-employee-recognition-ideas Micro-Recognition Informal Recognition Formal Recognition
  27. 27. Activity!  Share some of your favorite ways to reward and recognize. Maybe you’ve given or received the recognition.  Report out to the larger group. 27
  28. 28. Retain 28
  29. 29. The Top Reasons for Quitting 1. Lack of career development and advancement 2. Inadequate total compensation 3. Uncaring and uninspiring leaders 4. Lack of meaningful work 5. Unsustainable work expectations 6. Unreliable and unsupportive people at work 7. Lack of workplace flexibility 8. Lack of support for health and well-being McKinsey Quarterly: The Great Attrition is making hiring harder. Are you searching the right talent pools? (April 2021-April 2022) 29
  30. 30. Pathways for Growth  Career Development Plan: Make sure every team member has a career development plan documented and has set short and long-term goals.  Strategy: Exposure to strategic planning.  Career Pathing: Dedicated career paths – make the stages and corresponding titles clear.  Recognition: Understand how each individual wants to be recognized – Is it compensation? Title? More responsibility?  Management Training: Create opportunities to begin to develop as a manager.  Financial Acumen: Expose team members to budgeting processes and help them develop financial acumen. 30
  31. 31. Management Training You may not have the opportunity to provide employees with a direct report just yet, but if this is part of their long-term career goals, there are ways to be creative to help them achieve this goal.  Thoughtful and robust internship program (not just “student workers”)  Management training – even if they aren’t managers just yet!  Expose the team member to the performance review process. 31
  32. 32. The “Place” of Work What is your current “policy”?  “Purposeful Presence” and intentional ways to maximize in-person time.  Hybrid models work – consider the following to make them successful:  Consistent days in the office vs. remote. Consistent hours. Communicate to team and partners.  Keep calendar updated for schedule transparency.  Set boundaries on and communicate when not available or when available.  Technology (free and paid) to support communication and transparency (Slack, Teams, texting, phone calls).  Standards for home office – effective internet connection, dedicated workspace, room with a door, set expectations for video calls, headphones/headset, microphone, etc. 32 https://eab.com/research/strategy/resource-center/remote-work-education-leaders/
  33. 33. Case Study Highlights: 1. Created more day-to-day student facing roles with existing headcount budget. 2. Flexible work hours include four 10-hour days, earlier/later start/end times, designated remote days. 3. Open conversation for all team members to evolve standards and processes. 33
  34. 34. Bonus Content: The Anatomy of a Great Meeting (by EAB) 34 https://eab.com/insights/infographic/workplace/the-anatomy-of-a-great-meeting/
  35. 35. Additional Ideas for Consideration  Tools for Success: Proactively alleviate frustration that comes with unproductive productivity tools (ex. reliable technology, project management systems, etc.). Recognize and address quickly.  Purposeful Employee Wellbeing Initiatives: “Wellbeing can be achieved when our mind, body, and sense of purpose lead us to feel positive about ourselves and satisfied with our lives. Businesses should treat wellbeing as a tangible skill, a critical business input, and a measurable outcome.” McKinsey  Exit Interviews: If it gets there, go deep! Establish themes/trends, prioritize, and create action plans to address. 35
  36. 36. Wrap-Up  What is one thing that you learned today that you’ll bring back with you?  Pick one representative to share out to the larger group. 36
  37. 37. Thank you! 37 AMA HIGHER ED | NOVEMBER 2022 #AMAHIGHERED THE WARD GROUP Julie Ried – jried@wardgroup.com Vanessa Theoharis – vtheoharis@wardgroup.com

Editor's Notes

  • Julie
  • Julie and Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Julie

    https://chiefexecutive.net/in-the-war-for-talent-good-is-no-longer-good-enough/
    https://warrenaverett.com/insights/staffing-and-recruiting/
  • Julie

    https://hbr.org/sponsored/2022/01/how-to-attract-top-talent-in-2022
    https://www.mckinsey.com/capabilities/people-and-organizational-performance/our-insights/attracting-and-retaining-the-right-talent
  • Vanessa

    https://www.mckinsey.com/capabilities/people-and-organizational-performance/our-insights/attracting-and-retaining-the-right-talent
  • Vanessa and Julie
  • Vanessa and Julie
  • Vanessa and Julie

    https://www.untapped.io/blog/how-to-create-an-impactful-recruitment-strategy-in-todays-market
  • Julie
  • Vanessa

    https://blog.hrtrove.com/beyond-skills-why-competencies-are-important-as-your-organization-grows
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa

    https://www.gallup.com/workplace/388685/2022-employee-engagement-guide.aspx
  • Julie
  • Julie

    https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/me/learning/en-us/pdfs/lil-guide-how-learning-attracts-retains-top-talent.pdf
  • Julie and Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa and Julie
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Julie
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Julie
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa and Julie
  • Vanessa and Julie

    https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6983437603580612611/
  • Vanessa
  • Vanessa
  • Julie

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