4/18/13No Article Review this weekEnergy plan due next FridayHomework: Read 11.4 and 11.5
Reading QuizTomorrow we will have a quiz over tonight’s reading. Be able todo the following  Explain soil degradation, sla...
ReviewCompare and contrast the various forms ofmalnutrition.Discuss factors that contribute to malnutrition.Relate the con...
ObjectivesDiscuss the benefits and drawbacks of industrialfarming practices.Debate using genetically modified organisms in...
QuestionsHow has farming changed in the last 75 years?
Do The MathBefore we get into it, work through this mathproblem.Help those at your table.Don’t give answers, give help
Do The MathOn farms in the midwestern United States, a hectare ofland yields roughly 370 bushels of corn (equivalent to 15...
Do The MathOn farms in the midwestern United States, a hectare of landyields roughly 370 bushels of corn (equivalent to 15...
Do The MathIf a person were to eat only corn, how many hectares of landwould it take to support the person?730,000 kilocal...
Do The MathWhat if the person ate only beef? 20 kg of grain are neededto produce 1 kg of beef. So it would take 20 times a...
Do The MathIf the Earth has about 1.5 billion hectares of land suitable forgrowing food, is there sufficient land on Earth...
Do The MathHow many people eating a beef-only diet could Earthsupport?1.5 billion ha land X (1 person/0.4 ha) = 3.75 billi...
Green RevolutionWhat are the majorcomponents of the GreenRevolution?  Mechanization  Irrigation  Fertilization  Monocroppi...
MechanizationHow do labor costs drivethe use of mechanization?What is an economy ofscale?With regard to farm sizeand crop ...
IrrigationWhat are the benefits ofirrigation?What are theconsequences?  Aquifer damage  Waterlogging  Salinization
FertilizersWhy does industrialagriculture make fertilizeruse necessary?What are the primarynutrients in fertilizer?What ar...
FertilizersHow are syntheticfertilizers produced?What are their benefitsand drawbacks?What are the benefits anddrawbacks o...
MonocroppingWhat is monocropping?What are the benefits anddrawbacks ofmonocropping?
PesticidesHow does monocroppingmake pesticide use moreprevalent?What is the differencebetween insecticide andherbicide?Sel...
PesticidesTalk to me about DDT andbioaccumulation?What is pesticidepersistence?How does pesticide uselead to resistance?Wh...
GMOTake 5 minutes and discussGMO with your table  What do you know?  Are you in favor?  What questions do you  have?Have s...
GMOHow does a geneticallymodified organism come tobe?What are the benefits?  Crop yield  Changes in pesticides  Increased ...
GMOWhat are the drawbacks?  Safety concerns  Effects on Biodiversity  Regulation
AP PracticeWhich of the following describes a fundamental characteristic of the GreenRevolution in food resources?   A. Th...
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Green Revolution

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An introduction to the Green Revolution and industrial agriculture.

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Green Revolution

  1. 1. 4/18/13No Article Review this weekEnergy plan due next FridayHomework: Read 11.4 and 11.5
  2. 2. Reading QuizTomorrow we will have a quiz over tonight’s reading. Be able todo the following Explain soil degradation, slash and burn agriculture, and desertification. Describe the benefits and drawbacks of sustainable farming practices, no-till agriculture, and integrated pest management. Discuss organic agriculture. Understand CAFOs, impacts of fish harvesting, and aquaculture
  3. 3. ReviewCompare and contrast the various forms ofmalnutrition.Discuss factors that contribute to malnutrition.Relate the concept of energy subsidy to the conceptof ecological footprint.Describe the Green Revolution.
  4. 4. ObjectivesDiscuss the benefits and drawbacks of industrialfarming practices.Debate using genetically modified organisms inagriculture.
  5. 5. QuestionsHow has farming changed in the last 75 years?
  6. 6. Do The MathBefore we get into it, work through this mathproblem.Help those at your table.Don’t give answers, give help
  7. 7. Do The MathOn farms in the midwestern United States, a hectare ofland yields roughly 370 bushels of corn (equivalent to 150bushels per acre). A bushel of consists of 1,250 ears ofcorn, and each ear typically contains 80 kilocalories.Assume that a person eats only corn and requires 2,000kilocalories per day.How many calories does a person require in a year?2,000 kilocalories/day X 365 days/year = 730,000kilocalories.year
  8. 8. Do The MathOn farms in the midwestern United States, a hectare of landyields roughly 370 bushels of corn (equivalent to 150 bushelsper acre). A bushel of consists of 1,250 ears of corn, and eachear typically contains 80 kilocalories. Assume that a personeats only corn and requires 2,000 kilocalories per day.How many calories does a hectare of corn produce?370 bushels/hectare X 1250 ears/bushel X 80 kilocalories/ear= 37,000,000 kilocalories/hectare
  9. 9. Do The MathIf a person were to eat only corn, how many hectares of landwould it take to support the person?730,000 kilocalories/year ÷ 37,000,000 kilocalories/hectare =.02 hectares of land
  10. 10. Do The MathWhat if the person ate only beef? 20 kg of grain are neededto produce 1 kg of beef. So it would take 20 times as muchland to feed a person who only at beef. How much landwould it take to support that person?0.02 X 20 = 0.4 hectares
  11. 11. Do The MathIf the Earth has about 1.5 billion hectares of land suitable forgrowing food, is there sufficient land on Earth to feed all theinhabitants of the planet if they only ate beef?7 billion people X 0.4 ha/person = 2.8 billion ha needed
  12. 12. Do The MathHow many people eating a beef-only diet could Earthsupport?1.5 billion ha land X (1 person/0.4 ha) = 3.75 billion people
  13. 13. Green RevolutionWhat are the majorcomponents of the GreenRevolution? Mechanization Irrigation Fertilization Monocropping Pesticides
  14. 14. MechanizationHow do labor costs drivethe use of mechanization?What is an economy ofscale?With regard to farm sizeand crop diversity, whatare the consequences ofmechanization?
  15. 15. IrrigationWhat are the benefits ofirrigation?What are theconsequences? Aquifer damage Waterlogging Salinization
  16. 16. FertilizersWhy does industrialagriculture make fertilizeruse necessary?What are the primarynutrients in fertilizer?What are the twocategories of fertilizer?
  17. 17. FertilizersHow are syntheticfertilizers produced?What are their benefitsand drawbacks?What are the benefits anddrawbacks of organicfertilizers
  18. 18. MonocroppingWhat is monocropping?What are the benefits anddrawbacks ofmonocropping?
  19. 19. PesticidesHow does monocroppingmake pesticide use moreprevalent?What is the differencebetween insecticide andherbicide?Selective and broad-spectrum?What are the benefits anddrawbacks?
  20. 20. PesticidesTalk to me about DDT andbioaccumulation?What is pesticidepersistence?How does pesticide uselead to resistance?What is the pesticidetreadmill?
  21. 21. GMOTake 5 minutes and discussGMO with your table What do you know? Are you in favor? What questions do you have?Have someone take notesto report to class
  22. 22. GMOHow does a geneticallymodified organism come tobe?What are the benefits? Crop yield Changes in pesticides Increased profit
  23. 23. GMOWhat are the drawbacks? Safety concerns Effects on Biodiversity Regulation
  24. 24. AP PracticeWhich of the following describes a fundamental characteristic of the GreenRevolution in food resources? A. The application of higher levels of organic fertilizers to increase rice production B. Deforestation to provide field crops with increased sunlight for photosynthesis C. The addition of calorie, fat, and fiber percentages to the information provided on food package labels D. The development of new strains of crops with higher yields E. The discovery that chlorophyll adds nutritional value to wheat, rice, and sorghum

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