A JOURNEY TO HIGH
PERFORMANCE
Presented by:
Dr. Wm. (Chip) Valutis
WHY IS THERE SUCH A DISCONTINUITY
BETWEEN
THE PROMISE OF “IMPROVEMENT” PROGRAMS
AND ACTUAL RESULTS?
The recipe is unlikely...
A HIGH PERFORMANCE
ORGANIZATION
Is an organization that is better at everything it
does than its competitors, and is dilig...
HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATION
(CONT’D)
Is an organization that out performs all others (by any
measure) not “because of ” ...
STATED DIFFERENTLY,
A HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATION IS...
Ordinary people producing
extraordinary results,
With more fun a...
CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH
PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS
• Participative leadership --
empowering and serving others
• Aligned pu...
CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH
PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS (CONT’D)
• Results focused
• Creative -- fully using
individual talents
...
WHAT IT TAKES - A MACRO
VIEW
A fanatical commitment by every manager at
every level at all times (you can predict shortfal...
WHAT IT TAKES - A MACRO VIEW (CONT’D)
A realization that what drives performance is necessity
A realistic appreciation of ...
THE CONCEPT OF
VIRTUOSITY
“The lifelong work process of
striving to be the best you can be”
blog.djarumbeasiswaplus.org
THE CONCEPT OF NECESSITY
It is not based on rewards and punishment - it derives from
one’s certainty about consequences (i...
WHAT HAS TO BE
ACCOMPLISHED
Making it necessary for each of
your subordinates to be forever
on the path of becoming
virtuo...
WHAT HAS TO BE
ACCOMPLISHED (CONT’D)
Making it necessary for
each of your subordinates
to perform as the Chief
Steward of ...
THE CONSEQUENCES
ARE...
That, these accomplished, the organization will turn
upside-down (so that it can function “bottom-...
WHAT IT TAKES - THE
LEADER’S ROLE
A different, sometimes unconventional, way of
thinking about the same old things (to lea...
WHAT IT TAKES - THE LEADER’S ROLE
(CONT’D)
A strategy perceived as adequate to the purpose and the
perceived ability of ha...
CORE STRATEGIES FOR HIGH
PERFORMANCE
The strategic distribution of the ownership of
problems
Making possible what’s necess...
MAKING NECESSARY WHAT’S
POSSIBLE
Passionate belief in a organization comes from:
The vision of the CEO and the management ...
MAKING NECESSARY WHAT’S
POSSIBLE (CONT’D)
Most organizations attempt to drive change through
information (memos, slogans, ...
MAKING NECESSARY WHAT’S
POSSIBLE (CONT’D)
...Results come from behavior, not information
Therefore… to significantly change...
MAKING POSSIBLE WHAT’S
NECESSARY
Effective communication and information (clear and compelling
purpose/clear roles and res...
OBSTACLES AND BARRIERS
The conventional “managerial” mindset (it’s
paradoxical that most of the key ingredients of a
“succ...
MOVING TOWARD HIGH
PERFORMANCE ENTAILS...
Employee pain
Manager pain
www.picstopin.com
EMPLOYEE PAIN
Leaps for all to take. Can they make it?
They’re responsible
 We’re responsible
Not my fault 	 	 	 I am acco...
EMPLOYEE PAIN (CONT’D)
Procedures	 	 	 Self-initiative
Status quo	 	 	 Continuous improvement
Risk avoidance	 	 Risk takin...
MANAGER PAIN
The toughest leap of all
Boss	 	 	 	 	 Coach
Manager		 	 	 Leader
Power		 	 	 Make powerful
Control	 	 	 Comm...
MANAGER PAIN (CONT’D)
Positional worth		 	 Results contribution
Chain of command 	 	 Get the job done
Demand hours 		 	 De...
BELIEFS ABOUT
PERFORMANCE
People can, will and desire to improve their performance
Managers have a greater impact on emplo...
ABC’S OF WHY PEOPLE DO WHAT
THEY DO
A B C
Antecedents Behavior Consequences
what happens before specific performance what h...
THE POWER OF MANAGING CONSEQUENCES --
THE STORY OF SISTER MARY AND NATHAN
Sister Mary stood before her very young parochia...
THE STORY OF SISTER MARY AND
NATHAN (CONT’D)
Finally, after several more incorrect answers, a little Jewish
boy raised his...
A STEP BY STEP APPROACH TO
IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY
Identify the desired results
Identify the behavior needed
Establish perf...
IDENTIFY THE DESIRED RESULTS
“50% of an organization’s activities produce less than 5% of its value
added”
 
 - Kepner Tre...
IDENTIFY THE BEHAVIOR NEEDED
• Solid solutions rather than quick fixes
• Measured risk taking rather than risk avoidance
• ...
SMART RISK TAKING
Teach people that intelligent errors are part of the cost of progress
Celebrate both successes and failu...
DECISIVE ACTION
Make decision making a habit
Don’t tolerate reverse decision making
Create a detailed vision of the result...
PINPOINT SUCCESS
ACTIVITIES
•What do the best performers do that makes them
successful? (look at our organization, our com...
ESTABLISH PERFORMANCE
MEASURES
You’ve heard the acronym “SMART” objectives
	 	 	 	 Specific
Measurable
Achievable
Real impo...
CHOOSING PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Also consider:
The linkage of the measure to vision and strategy
The ability of the individu...
ESTABLISH THE
REWARD STRUCTURE
Reward the
behavior you
want
Decide on the
proper
rewards
www.lingholic.com
REWARD THE BEHAVIOR YOU WANT
The story of the fisherman and the snake:
A weekend fisherman looked over the side of his boat ...
DECIDE ON PROPER
REWARDS
✤Recognition	 	
✤Favorite work		
✤Personal growth
and development
✤Advancement	 	
	
Key: vary rew...
THE INDUSTRIAL
PSYCHOLOGISTS
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
McGregor’s Theory X & Theory Y
Herzberg’s Motivation-Hygiene Theo...
MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS
People continually seek the satisfaction of certain needs:
Physiological needs (basic survival...
MASLOW’S
HIERARCHY OF NEEDS
Until lower level needs are satisfied,
higher level needs cannot be activated
Once a lower leve...
MCGREGOR’S THEORY X
AND THEORY Y
Managers’ styles of leading and directing people are very
closely related to their belief...
MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND
THEORY Y (CONT’D)
Theory X Assumptions
Employees basically inherently dislike work
Employees prefe...
MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND THEORY Y
(CONT’D)
Theory Y assumptions
The expenditure of physical and mental effort in work is as...
MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND THEORY Y
(CONT’D)
Commitment to objectives can be achieved through the
satisfaction of employee’s ...
HERZBERG’S MOTIVATION -
HYGIENE THEORY
Two sets of factors are operative in any job situation -
satisfiers and dissatisfiers...
PRINCIPLES OF VERTICAL JOB
LOADING
Principle
Removing some controls while
retaining accountability
Increasing the accounta...
PRINCIPLES OF VERTICAL JOB LOADING
(CONT’D)
Principle
Granting additional authority to an
employee in his or her activity;...
MEASURE AND RECORD
Set up a tracking system
Establish baseline where possible
Frequently is important
Make it visible -- u...
EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK
Immediate
Specific
Descriptive rather than judgmental (be a video camera not an
interpreter or evaluator...
OTHER THOUGHTS
ON FEEDBACK
❖In the absence of positive feedback, the assumption is
predominantly negative
❖Before giving n...
“I” MESSAGE
FEEDBACK FORMAT
When you…
…I feel…
…and the results or
consequences are…
What would be
more helpful to me
is…
...
PERFORMANCE REVIEW
ANALYSIS
• Specifically, what was accomplished?
• Were the real problems/issues brought out? What were
t...
PERFORMANCE REVIEW ANALYSIS
(CONT’D)
Was there a mutual job understanding?
Was there a joint setting of performance object...
WHO DO YOU SPEND YOUR TIME WITH?
High performance companies focus resources (both time and
money) on high performers
Do yo...
EFFECTIVE ONE TO ONE
COACHING SESSIONS
Planned in advance to mutually convenient schedules
No interruptions
Openness and t...
EFFECTIVE ONE TO ONE
COACHING SESSIONS (CONT’D)
Manager primarily listens, but asks good, open-ended
questions; probes for...
EFFECTIVE
RECOGNITION
Make it planned and spontaneous
Planning is essential or it won’t happen
regularly
Spontaneity enhan...
EFFECTIVE RECOGNITION (CONT’D)
Vary forms of recognition
Money spent does not equal value received
For most people, moneta...
CELEBRATE
Often
Small victories or
achievements as well as
major successes
Creativity involved is more
important than mone...
Valutis Consulting is a full service management consultant
firm. Our approach is to investigate and understand
organization...
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Journey To High Performance

  1. 1. A JOURNEY TO HIGH PERFORMANCE Presented by: Dr. Wm. (Chip) Valutis
  2. 2. WHY IS THERE SUCH A DISCONTINUITY BETWEEN THE PROMISE OF “IMPROVEMENT” PROGRAMS AND ACTUAL RESULTS? The recipe is unlikely to be any better than the cooks -- that is the managers in place There is no sure way to change the culture of an organization in fundamental ways except by changing the people in power -- if the same people remain in power and they do not change in perceivably significant ways, not much else is going to change Transforming an organization requires (in most cases) Transforming its leaders -- what isn’t right there will inevitably spoil the broth
  3. 3. A HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATION Is an organization that is better at everything it does than its competitors, and is diligently and incessantly at work improving everything it does at a rate that significantly outpaces its competitors Has a purpose that is used to focus the energies and consciences of all of its members Is one that simultaneously and continuously maximizes the best self interests of all of its stakeholders
  4. 4. HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATION (CONT’D) Is an organization that out performs all others (by any measure) not “because of ” what propels it, but “in spite of” any and all obstacles that impede its path Is one that makes it possible -- and necessary -- for ordinary people to perform in extraordinary fashion Is one that has transformed its people into “owners” of the life and destiny of the organization Is a healthy organization that is irrevocably committed to being great -- whatever it takes
  5. 5. STATED DIFFERENTLY, A HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATION IS... Ordinary people producing extraordinary results, With more fun and less drama, Using evolutionary learning frameworks, To create a future inconsistent with mediocrity
  6. 6. CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS • Participative leadership -- empowering and serving others • Aligned purpose • Shared fate -- all are accountable • High communication -- trust, openness, honesty • Future focused -- seek (r)evolutionary improvements www.impactbnd.com
  7. 7. CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS (CONT’D) • Results focused • Creative -- fully using individual talents • Rapid response -- sense of urgency for opportunity • Use high performance teams as the implementation tool of choice www.imperativesolves.com
  8. 8. WHAT IT TAKES - A MACRO VIEW A fanatical commitment by every manager at every level at all times (you can predict shortfall by how much less than total commitment there is throughout the managerial cadre of the organization) A deep understanding of the fact that high performance is not a goal or achievement, but a way of life (the concept of virtuosity) An unbounded willingness to “pay the price”
  9. 9. WHAT IT TAKES - A MACRO VIEW (CONT’D) A realization that what drives performance is necessity A realistic appreciation of the fact that the way a high performance organization works is so different from the way a conventional organization works as to constitute a different paradigm A recognition that it is only when people manage themselves and their own work, and have some control over the work systems in which they perform, that high performance even becomes possible
  10. 10. THE CONCEPT OF VIRTUOSITY “The lifelong work process of striving to be the best you can be” blog.djarumbeasiswaplus.org
  11. 11. THE CONCEPT OF NECESSITY It is not based on rewards and punishment - it derives from one’s certainty about consequences (if a person knows what the consequences of his or her performance will be, even though they have never been seen, there is necessity) Most people will only instrument themselves to make difficult change if they need to The most powerful, potent necessity is habit
  12. 12. WHAT HAS TO BE ACCOMPLISHED Making it necessary for each of your subordinates to be forever on the path of becoming virtuosos at what they do in the organization Making it necessary for each of your subordinates to think and act as leaders whenever it is advantageous to the organization to do so http://www.thechangeblog.com/life-path/
  13. 13. WHAT HAS TO BE ACCOMPLISHED (CONT’D) Making it necessary for each of your subordinates to perform as the Chief Steward of the organization’s mission Making it necessary for all of your subordinates to be ready, willing and able to take over your role and to perform it better than you do www.activegarage.com
  14. 14. THE CONSEQUENCES ARE... That, these accomplished, the organization will turn upside-down (so that it can function “bottom-up”) as a result of the fact that its center of gravity has now shifted from the top down www.orientplanet.com
  15. 15. WHAT IT TAKES - THE LEADER’S ROLE A different, sometimes unconventional, way of thinking about the same old things (to lead people from where they are to where they ought to be requires a mind set that sees and interprets everything from there, not from here) A level of perversity of thought and action, where required, that is at least as perverse as the world is A great and worthy purpose that captures the hearts and the imaginations of those who would follow
  16. 16. WHAT IT TAKES - THE LEADER’S ROLE (CONT’D) A strategy perceived as adequate to the purpose and the perceived ability of having what it takes, against all obstacles, to lead the way through to that purpose Disciples who are as committed to the cause of the organization as the leaders are An ability and willingness to tell a compelling story, not of what is, but of what will be A willingness to re-launch the mission, every day if necessary, in order to dislodge the inertial forces of the old culture
  17. 17. CORE STRATEGIES FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE The strategic distribution of the ownership of problems Making possible what’s necessary and making necessary what’s possible Accomplishments, not activities Choice The learning mode Bringing life back into work
  18. 18. MAKING NECESSARY WHAT’S POSSIBLE Passionate belief in a organization comes from: The vision of the CEO and the management team (a compelling purpose/an ideal that people have passion for) Commitment of the CEO and the management team (you cannot lead from the rear) A willingness to endure the pain and struggles of pursuing the vision (actions must be consistent with words/real passion and loyalty are built over time) Visible culture and values (there can be no belief without trust)
  19. 19. MAKING NECESSARY WHAT’S POSSIBLE (CONT’D) Most organizations attempt to drive change through information (memos, slogans, posters, banners, speeches, presentations, etc) While information is seductive (easy to produce/easy to handle), it is largely ineffective at driving significant change because... www.m ynotetakingnerd.com brillianttraining.org
  20. 20. MAKING NECESSARY WHAT’S POSSIBLE (CONT’D) ...Results come from behavior, not information Therefore… to significantly change results, you must change behavior Since people behave according to what they believe in, high performance requires that you align their beliefs with the purpose of the organization -- People that are passionate in their beliefs are capable of extraordinary performance The linkage is in creating belief in what is possible
  21. 21. MAKING POSSIBLE WHAT’S NECESSARY Effective communication and information (clear and compelling purpose/clear roles and responsibilities /specific performance goals/ clear success measures) Effective resource allocation and prioritization (time, money, facilities, equipment, people, etc.) Effective operating systems (human resource, data processing, financial, tracking, etc.) A learning organization (training & development) The elimination of management driven organizational “politics”
  22. 22. OBSTACLES AND BARRIERS The conventional “managerial” mindset (it’s paradoxical that most of the key ingredients of a “successful” manager’s mindset will work against the making of a high performance organization) Habits, which, in organizations, become “routines” or the “way we do things around here” Under-empowerment Dumb systems The larger, “pop” culture
  23. 23. MOVING TOWARD HIGH PERFORMANCE ENTAILS... Employee pain Manager pain www.picstopin.com
  24. 24. EMPLOYEE PAIN Leaps for all to take. Can they make it? They’re responsible We’re responsible Not my fault I am accountable Not my job Just do it We always did it that way Do the right thing Their problem We sink together
  25. 25. EMPLOYEE PAIN (CONT’D) Procedures Self-initiative Status quo Continuous improvement Risk avoidance Risk taking React Pro-act Certainty Ambiguity
  26. 26. MANAGER PAIN The toughest leap of all Boss Coach Manager Leader Power Make powerful Control Commitment Alone Shared fate
  27. 27. MANAGER PAIN (CONT’D) Positional worth Results contribution Chain of command Get the job done Demand hours Demand results Decision maker Facilitator Maintain system Destroy mediocrity
  28. 28. BELIEFS ABOUT PERFORMANCE People can, will and desire to improve their performance Managers have a greater impact on employees than they think they do Long term performance improvement requires management of the consequences of performance www.keison.co.uk
  29. 29. ABC’S OF WHY PEOPLE DO WHAT THEY DO A B C Antecedents Behavior Consequences what happens before specific performance what happens after gets performance started observable maintains performance measurable examples: examples: education recognition training feedback equipment promotions raises positive/negative/neutral
  30. 30. THE POWER OF MANAGING CONSEQUENCES -- THE STORY OF SISTER MARY AND NATHAN Sister Mary stood before her very young parochial-school class. She held up a shiny silver dollar and said, “ I’ll give this dollar to the first boy or girl who can name the greatest man who ever lived.” “Was it Michelangelo?” asked a little Italian boy. “No,” replied Sister Mary. “Michelangelo was a brilliant artist but he wasn’t the greatest man who ever lived.” “Was it Aristotle?” asked a little Greek girl. “No,” Sister Mary answered. “Aristotle was a great thinker and the father of logic, but he wasn’t the greatest man who ever lived.”
  31. 31. THE STORY OF SISTER MARY AND NATHAN (CONT’D) Finally, after several more incorrect answers, a little Jewish boy raised his hand and said, “I know who it was, Sister. It was Jesus Christ.” “That’s right,” she replied and promptly gave him the dollar. Being somewhat surprised at the Jewish boy’s answer, she approached him on the playground at recess and asked, “Nathan, do you really believe Jesus Christ was the greatest man who ever lived?” “Of course not Sister,” Nathan replied. “Everyone knows Moses was the greatest. But business is business.”
  32. 32. A STEP BY STEP APPROACH TO IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY Identify the desired results Identify the behavior needed Establish performance measures Establish the reward structure Measure and record Feedback, recognition and celebration www.businessplan123.de
  33. 33. IDENTIFY THE DESIRED RESULTS “50% of an organization’s activities produce less than 5% of its value added” - Kepner Trego study “Too much attention has been focused on eliminating unnecessary jobs and too little on cutting unnecessary work” - Robert Tomasko “Nothing is less productive than to make more efficient what should not be done at all” - Peter Drucker -- Eliminate work that doesn’t add to the bottom line -- Focus people and resources on areas that do
  34. 34. IDENTIFY THE BEHAVIOR NEEDED • Solid solutions rather than quick fixes • Measured risk taking rather than risk avoidance • Applied creativity rather than mindless conformity • Decisive action rather than paralysis by analysis • Smart work rather than busy work • Simplification rather than needless complication • Quality work rather than fast work • Team player rather than confrontational individualism • Quiet effectiveness rather than “squeaking wheels” • Loyalty
  35. 35. SMART RISK TAKING Teach people that intelligent errors are part of the cost of progress Celebrate both successes and failures Don’t take risks for others or bail them out if things go sour Encourage smart risks, not foolish chances - Have a goal; a risk without a clear purpose is dumb - Consider the worst possible outcome and be sure you can live with it - Weigh the potential problems and losses against the potential gains; a smart risk is worth it - Once you decide to take a risk, do your best and don’t look back - Limit your losses; if things don’t go well, get out before you lose too much
  36. 36. DECISIVE ACTION Make decision making a habit Don’t tolerate reverse decision making Create a detailed vision of the results needed Set a deadline for making a decision Obtain the best information you can within the time limits Brainstorm as many different alternatives as you can Think though the options Make prudent use of intuition Take action
  37. 37. PINPOINT SUCCESS ACTIVITIES •What do the best performers do that makes them successful? (look at our organization, our competitors, our industry, and the outside world) •Most people are not conscious of what makes them successful
  38. 38. ESTABLISH PERFORMANCE MEASURES You’ve heard the acronym “SMART” objectives Specific Measurable Achievable Real importance Time bounded www.shellypalmer.com
  39. 39. CHOOSING PERFORMANCE MEASURES Also consider: The linkage of the measure to vision and strategy The ability of the individual to understand the measure (both what it is and why it is important) The ability of the individual to influence the measure The organization’s and the individual’s ability to track the measure (timely availability of data) The input of the individual in establishing the measure
  40. 40. ESTABLISH THE REWARD STRUCTURE Reward the behavior you want Decide on the proper rewards www.lingholic.com
  41. 41. REWARD THE BEHAVIOR YOU WANT The story of the fisherman and the snake: A weekend fisherman looked over the side of his boat and saw a snake with a frog in its mouth. Feeling sorry for the frog, he reached down, gently removed the frog from the snake’s mouth and let the frog go free. But now he felt sorry for the the hungry snake. Having no food, he took out a flask of bourbon and poured a few drops into the snake’s mouth. The snake swam away happy, the frog was happy and the man was happy for having performed such good deeds. He thought all was well until a few minutes passed and he heard something knock against the side of his boat. He looked down and with stunned disbelief he saw that the snake was back -- with two frogs!
  42. 42. DECIDE ON PROPER REWARDS ✤Recognition ✤Favorite work ✤Personal growth and development ✤Advancement Key: vary rewards; use events; do lots of things; money spent does not equal value received ✤Freedom ✤Money ✤Time Off ✤Prizes ✤Fun
  43. 43. THE INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGISTS Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs McGregor’s Theory X & Theory Y Herzberg’s Motivation-Hygiene Theory
  44. 44. MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS People continually seek the satisfaction of certain needs: Physiological needs (basic survival needs - food, water, shelter, sleep, etc.) Safety needs Need for belongingness (desire for social interaction) Need for esteem (self-worth, competence and mastery) (appreciation, recognition and respect) Need for self-actualization (fulfillment of their inner selves, full potential)
  45. 45. MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS Until lower level needs are satisfied, higher level needs cannot be activated Once a lower level need has been basically satisfied, it no longer serves to motivate Ultimate productivity improvement flows from enabling employees to achieve self-esteem and self- actualization www.exec-comms.com
  46. 46. MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND THEORY Y Managers’ styles of leading and directing people are very closely related to their belief systems Most managers subscribe to one or two diametrically opposed theoretical constructs betacodex.org
  47. 47. MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND THEORY Y (CONT’D) Theory X Assumptions Employees basically inherently dislike work Employees prefer to be directed by supervisors Employees wish to avoid responsibility Employees are relatively unambitious Employees are primarily motivated by the need for security
  48. 48. MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND THEORY Y (CONT’D) Theory Y assumptions The expenditure of physical and mental effort in work is as natural as play or rest. Depending upon a variety of conditions, work can either be a source of satisfaction and will accordingly be willingly performed, or it can be a source of punishment and will, if possible, be avoided. External control and the threat of punishment are not management’s only means of stimulating employee effort toward achieving organizational objectives. Employees will exercise self-direction and self-control to reach objectives to which they are personally committed.
  49. 49. MCGREGOR’S THEORY X AND THEORY Y (CONT’D) Commitment to objectives can be achieved through the satisfaction of employee’s ego and self-actualization needs. The average person can learn to not only accept but to actively seek responsibility. The capacity to demonstrate imagination, ingenuity and creativity and apply them to solving organizational problems is widely, not narrowly, distributed in the work population. Under the conditions of modern industrial life, the intellectual potential of the average employee is only partially used.
  50. 50. HERZBERG’S MOTIVATION - HYGIENE THEORY Two sets of factors are operative in any job situation - satisfiers and dissatisfiers (these are completely different factors and distinguish non-satisfaction from dissatisfaction) Satisfiers are motivators and generally relate to job content Dissatisfiers are hygiene factors and generally relate to the job environment True motivation comes from job enrichment which, in turn, comes from vertical (not horizontal) job loading
  51. 51. PRINCIPLES OF VERTICAL JOB LOADING Principle Removing some controls while retaining accountability Increasing the accountability of individuals for own work Giving a person a complete natural unit of work (module, division, area, etc.) Motivators Involved Responsibility and personal achievement Responsibility and recognition Responsibility , recognition and achievement
  52. 52. PRINCIPLES OF VERTICAL JOB LOADING (CONT’D) Principle Granting additional authority to an employee in his or her activity; job freedom Making periodic reports directly available to the employee rather than to the supervisor Introducing new and more difficult tasks not previously handled Assigning individuals specific or specialized tasks, enabling them to become experts Motivators Involved Responsibility , recognition and achievement Internal recognition Growth and learning Responsibility, growth and advancement
  53. 53. MEASURE AND RECORD Set up a tracking system Establish baseline where possible Frequently is important Make it visible -- use graphs Why graphs? Easy to read Easy to understand Highly visible Shows trends clearly Results in less defensiveness
  54. 54. EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK Immediate Specific Descriptive rather than judgmental (be a video camera not an interpreter or evaluator) Avoid giving too much at one time Avoid giving positive and negative feedback at the same time (4 to 1 rule/“emotional checkbook” concept) Consider location for giving feedback Provide feedback that is within the influence of the individual
  55. 55. OTHER THOUGHTS ON FEEDBACK ❖In the absence of positive feedback, the assumption is predominantly negative ❖Before giving negative feedback, a good question to ask is “Would this happen again if I say or do nothing?” If it is not likely to happen again, don’t bring focus to it. ❖Withholding feedback is “cruel and unusual punishment”
  56. 56. “I” MESSAGE FEEDBACK FORMAT When you… …I feel… …and the results or consequences are… What would be more helpful to me is… (specific, descriptive behavior) (real feelings, not thoughts) (what actually happens due to the behavior) (specific behavioral example) Name:___________________
  57. 57. PERFORMANCE REVIEW ANALYSIS • Specifically, what was accomplished? • Were the real problems/issues brought out? What were they? • Was there a good manager - employee relationship? Was there openness, leveling and mutual respect? How well did we communicate? Was I perceived as a helper, or as a punitive judge?
  58. 58. PERFORMANCE REVIEW ANALYSIS (CONT’D) Was there a mutual job understanding? Was there a joint setting of performance objectives? Was there a definite joint commitment for performance improvement? Was there a meaningful discussion of employee career interests and possible opportunities (current and future)? Were personal development goals and required training discussed and agreed to? How did each of us feel about the meeting? Did we discuss it?
  59. 59. WHO DO YOU SPEND YOUR TIME WITH? High performance companies focus resources (both time and money) on high performers Do you spend it effectively? Consider use of formal 1 on 1 coaching sessions Spend 80% of your time listening Consider use of advise/consult/agree format to foster responsibility while maintaining control
  60. 60. EFFECTIVE ONE TO ONE COACHING SESSIONS Planned in advance to mutually convenient schedules No interruptions Openness and trust is essential Both parties participate with enthusiasm and energy Subordinate comes prepared with specific (and important) business issues to discuss
  61. 61. EFFECTIVE ONE TO ONE COACHING SESSIONS (CONT’D) Manager primarily listens, but asks good, open-ended questions; probes for critical opportunities and problems; and provides feedback Action plans (or revisions) are developed by the subordinate and are mutually agreed to (use written forms) Close with a review of the discussion and how it can (will) be improved
  62. 62. EFFECTIVE RECOGNITION Make it planned and spontaneous Planning is essential or it won’t happen regularly Spontaneity enhances effect and value (people like surprises) nextiva.com
  63. 63. EFFECTIVE RECOGNITION (CONT’D) Vary forms of recognition Money spent does not equal value received For most people, monetary recognition has short- term value and establishes future expectations which, when not fulfilled, are counter-productive to the recognition intent Symbolic recognition satisfies the higher human need for “mental wages” and for most people has longer lasting value
  64. 64. CELEBRATE Often Small victories or achievements as well as major successes Creativity involved is more important than money spent Encourage broad involvement www.examiner.com
  65. 65. Valutis Consulting is a full service management consultant firm. Our approach is to investigate and understand organizational issues, customize realistic solutions, and design practical strategies to move clients toward their specific business and personal goals. Our mission is to help our clients unlock the potential of their organization and its people. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or to schedule an appointment to discuss your organization’s needs and how we can help. (716)634-2553 chip@valutisconsulting.com www.valutisconsulting.com - website www.the4thquarterman.com - blog

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