Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Circumpolar Constellations of the Earth’s Hemispheres

34 views

Published on

Valerie Varnuska is a Westbury, NY, resident with a wide variety of interests, including an appreciation for trains and new developments in robotics. In her free time, Valerie Varnuska enjoys pursuing her favorite hobbies, including stargazing.

Published in: Science
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Circumpolar Constellations of the Earth’s Hemispheres

  1. 1. THE CIRCUMPOLAR CONSTELLATIONS OF THE EARTH’S HEMISPHERES Valerie Varnuska
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION  Valerie Varnuska is a Westbury, NY, resident with a wide variety of interests, including an appreciation for trains and new developments in robotics. In her free time, Valerie Varnuska enjoys pursuing her favorite hobbies, including stargazing. Stargazing is a pastime that people can enjoy from anywhere in the world. While certain collections of stars can only be seen in any given part of the world during certain times of year, some constellations, known as circumpolar constellations, never leave the sky. These groups of stars never seem to rise or set due to the perpendicular nature of the Earth’s axis in relation to its orbit, which means the skies above the North and South Poles change very little during the year. For people living in the Earth’s Northern Hemisphere, five primary constellations are circumpolar, even from as near to the equator as 40 degrees latitude. These include Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, Draco, Cassiopeia, and Cepheus. Though inhabitants of the Southern Hemisphere are able to see an even larger collection of stars than those who live in the Northern Hemisphere, only three constellations can be seen from this half of the Earth on a year-round basis. These include Crux, Carina, and Cantaurus.

×