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ArtArchaeologists Uncover More Evidence of Pointillism in Early Human Art

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Valerie Varnuska is a Westbury, NY, resident who enjoys learning about science and technology. Some of Valerie Varnuska's key interests include geology, paleontology, archaeology, and anthropology.

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ArtArchaeologists Uncover More Evidence of Pointillism in Early Human Art

  1. 1. Archaeologists Uncover More Evidence of Pointillism in Early Human Art Valerie Varnuska
  2. 2. Introduction • Valerie Varnuska is a Westbury, NY, resident who enjoys learning about science and technology. Some of Valerie Varnuska's key interests include geology, paleontology, archaeology, and anthropology. During a 2014 expedition, American archaeologist Randall White and his associates made a significant discovery in southwestern France. At the notable Abri Cellier site, where similarly significant discoveries have been made, his team discovered 16 human-decorated limestone rocks dating back 38,000 years.
  3. 3. Pointillism • These rocks are of interest not for their content, but for the style in which they are marked. They confirm that the Aurignacian people, Europe's first modern human culture, employed pointillism in their art. Pointillism is the style of art characterized by multitudes of tiny dots that create an image when viewed as a whole. This recently published discovery makes it clear that pointillism had been used by humans long before French impressionists came up with the idea in the 19th century. This has been theorized since a 1927 expedition in the same region produced 15 similarly engraved limestone pieces.

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