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Disclosures.pptx

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Disclosures.pptx

  1. 1. Module 7: Disclosures
  2. 2. What is a disclosure? A disclosure is when a child lets someone else know of a recent, ongoing or historic experience of harm. When a child discloses harm, it is often through their behavioural and emotional language A disclosure is may be direct ( by telling someone) or indirect ( though non verbal means)
  3. 3. Important.... The Royal Commission findings and other studies show that the average time before someone discloses abuse is about 20 years. This means that children are not being heard or understood during their childhood. There are many reasons why children don't disclose, and why adults don't hear when they attempt to tell.
  4. 4. Identifying Disclosures Not all disclosures involve a child directly telling an adult what has happened. In fact this rarely happens . Disclosures often take the form of indirect expressions of what has happened. In the following examples decide whether each should be considered a potential disclosure or not.
  5. 5. " I don't want to go to Uncle Jim's house anymore....... Is this a potential disclosure of abuse from a child? YES NO
  6. 6. YES! This is a potential disclosure Signs of anxiety or worry from a child about attending the home of a previously loved relative is a possible indirect disclosure.
  7. 7. A once-happy child has become sullen and withdrawn and gets aggressive when spoken to directly. Is this a potential disclosure of abuse from a child? YES NO
  8. 8. YES! This is a potential disclosure Heightened negative emotions eg aggression, are a common way for a child to disclose
  9. 9. A child's recent drawings are of dark and violent images Is this a potential disclosure of abuse from a child? YES NO
  10. 10. Artwork that depicts graphic imagery or writing about it, is a potential form of disclosure YES! This is a potential disclosure
  11. 11. Examples of possible indirect disclosures • Destructiveness • Non compliance • Non-verbal cues • Artwork • emotions • Aggression • Avoiding situations • Appearing disinterested • Through discussions and questions " is it ok to...? • Drawing or writing stories about sexual acts • Sexualised behaviours • Risk-taking behaviours • Self harming • Suicidal behaviour • Disordered eating • Drugs and alcohol
  12. 12. Responding to disclosures Now that you know a little more about identifying a possible disclosure, let's look at how to respond safely and effectively - particularly if a child or vulnerable adult, comes to you directly.
  13. 13. Responding to Disclosures For each question presented in this scenario you will be given a series of responses to choose from. Select the one you think is best suited to helping the child. Based on your response, you will get feedback, including the child's reaction as well as pointers about what was or was not ideal about your response.
  14. 14. You are approached by a child who has just returned from gym practice. She is visibly distressed and almost incapable of talking and will not look you in the eye. The child explains in stilted words that something happened to them involving an adult. Scenario
  15. 15. Thanks for telling me, are you ok? Next Thank you for telling me. Do you want to tell me what happened? Why dont you tell me what happened? Select your response from the options Ok, thanks for telling me. Did this happen at gym practice?
  16. 16. Ok, thanks for telling me. did this happen at gym practice? The child says yes, but no longer wants to talk about anything else If you try to coerce a particular response from a child, you run the risk of placing them in blame. Closed questions can have this effect, especially when you do not yet know what has happened. Try again
  17. 17. Can you tell me more about what happened? The child is more comfortable now and you can begin to seek more information. Next Did someone touch you or threaten you in any way? OK. What happened, was it at gymnastics? OK. was this adult at gymnastics? Select your response from the options
  18. 18. Can you tell more more about what happened? The child cautiously explains that an adult touched her after gym practice. Asking open-ended questions gives the child an opportunity to talk more about what happened and helps you decide what you need to do next. Next
  19. 19. I'll need to speak to the police. Can you tell me a little more? The child has now told you that she was touched by an adult at gym practice Next Has this only happened today? what can I do help you feel safe? Thank you for telling me. Was it your coach who did this? I'm going to talk to someone who can help. How can I help you feel safe now? Select your response from the options
  20. 20. Has this only happened today? What can I do to help you feel safe? The child says yes, then looks ashamed and no longer wants to talk. Assuring the child you are interested in keeping them safe is crucial. However, it is not your job to investigate. You only need to find out enough to know how to proceed. Try again
  21. 21. The child feels reassured. Informing the child of your next steps is crucial. Consider the age of the child, the context and any known risk factors and explain to her that you will need to talk with someone to help her be safe. Equally important is assuring her that you will support her throughout these next steps by checking on on what else you can do. Thank you for sharing that with me. I'm going to talk to someone who can help. How can I help you feel safe now?
  22. 22. Responses • Listen to the child • Stay calm • Believe the child • Tell them it's not their fault and they've done the right thing by telling • Let them tell you in their own words • Don't jump to conclusions • Only ask questions for clarification, not to investigate • Let the child know what you need to do next • If you need to clarify what the child is telling you only as 1 or 2 questions - the purpose of this is to assess what you need to do next.
  23. 23. Clarifying Questions Leading/closed questions • Did he/she touch you? • Was that ( him/her) that did that to you? • What else has ( he/she done to you? • Are you sure that happened? Open-ended Questions • Can you tell me more about that? • What happened? • when did this happen? • What do you need to help you feel safe now?

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