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The Design Of Interaction For eLearning

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Presentation sheds light on designing meaningful interactions that improve eLearning outcomes. Explore different types of content as defined by Dr. David Merrill and determine which of these content types lend themselves to digital interaction. Also find the Dos & Don’ts of interaction design.

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The Design Of Interaction For eLearning

  1. 1. Abhijit Kadle, AVP - Learning Design
  2. 2. 175 years eLearning professionals
  3. 3. 165 + clients 13 countries in UK US Middle East India Nigeria Kenya Australia S.Africa New Zealand Headquartered in Pune, India
  4. 4. 30 + awards and much recognition Custom eLearning Custom mLearning
  5. 5. Source: http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapid-elearning-blog/0710/form-based-elearning.png
  6. 6. Poll #1 If you were to describe this interaction, how would you do it? a. b. c. Engaging Boring Neither, just about acceptable
  7. 7. Agenda • A dose of Instructional Design • • Merrill’s performance/content matrix Content Types Amenable to Interaction • The Six Design Elements in Interaction • Using the Elements - An example • A concept • Some Dos and Don’ts
  8. 8. A dose of Instructional Design
  9. 9. Performance Content Matrix Find Use Remember Generality / Rule Remember Instance / Example Fact Concept Procedure Principle
  10. 10. Content Types • A fact is an association between a date and event or a name and part • A concept is a set of objects, events, or symbols that share common characteristics • A procedure is a set of steps for carrying out some activity • A principle is the cause-and-effect relationships in a process
  11. 11. Rule vs. Example • A generality (rule) is a statement of a definition, principle, or the steps in a procedure • An instance (example) is a specific illustration of an object, symbol, event, process, or procedure
  12. 12. Types Amenable to Interaction Find Use Remember Generality / Rule Remember Instance / Example Fact Concept Procedure Principle
  13. 13. The Six Design Elements in Interaction
  14. 14. The Six Elements of Interaction for eLearning 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Metaphor Content The Stage & Instructions Input & Output Feedback The End State
  15. 15. The Six Elements of Interaction for eLearning Metaphor, content, stage and instructions Source: http://www.moma.org/interactives/projects/2001/whatisaprint/flash.html
  16. 16. The Six Elements of Interaction for eLearning Input/Output, feedback, the end-state Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/interactives/3djigsaw_02/index.shtml?skeleton
  17. 17. An Important Difference Two primary ways of use 1. Content - nothing more than an exposition of content, a presentation method 2. Practice - test of knowledge, against a specific outcome
  18. 18. A concept: The Citrus Fruit Instructional Design First Use/Generality What is the use of a concept? Let’s you recognize and identify.
  19. 19. Using the Elements – An example
  20. 20. The Six Elements Metaphor The Book (a page turner) Page 9 of 50 Back Next
  21. 21. The Six Elements Content A citrus fruit is a globose to elongated, 4-30 cm long and 4-20 cm diameter, with a leathery rind or "peel“ of varied colors ranging from green to orange and red. The fruit contains segments that are filled with juicy pulp. Citrus fruits are known for their fragrance and the sourness due to citric acid content. Some citrus fruits are consumed by humans because they are both sweet and sour.
  22. 22. The Six Elements The Stage & Instructions 1. Core idea – class/attribute exploration 2. Stage to ‘create a citrus fruit’ 3. Superset of citrus fruit, is fruit. Using those attributes (shape, size, color, fragrance, flavor)
  23. 23. The Six Elements Content
  24. 24. The Six Elements The Stage & Instructions Shape Size Color Flavour These are instructions that describe how to use this interaction. Fragrance OK
  25. 25. The Six Elements Input & Output 1. Is the heart of interaction 2. Input limitations (device-based) (point and click) 3. Output is visual and aural
  26. 26. The Six Elements Input & Output Shape Size Color Flavour Fragrance Globose 30-40 cm Yellow Bitter Spicy Oblate 04-30 cm Red Sweet Floral Ellipsoid 08-40 cm Green Sour Fruity Pyriform 20-60 cm Blue Sweet-sour Zesty Obovate Spicy OK
  27. 27. The Six Elements Feedback 1. Feedback is different from output 2. Diagnostic, cue-based, remedial 3. Continuous vs. discrete Oblate 08-40 cm Blue Sweet Floral
  28. 28. The Six Elements The End State Final state learner see before next display Ensure it is cohesive and makes sense Oblate 08-40 cm Blue Sweet Floral Reset
  29. 29. Some Dos and Don’ts
  30. 30. Dos • Do ensure instructional alignment • Think beyond conventional interaction • Think of games • Think fun and engaging
  31. 31. Don’ts • Don’t focus on graphics and representation, that will follow • Don’t ‘dumb down’ the interaction, that will affect instructional outcome
  32. 32. Poll #2 Did you learn something interesting that you will be able to apply right away in your courseware? a. b. c. Yes No Maybe
  33. 33. Thank You Any questions?

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