What do you guys
DO back there?
the Office of the Vice President
Division of Student Affairs and Academic Support
What our families think we do
What some of you think we do
What we feel like we do
What we wish we did
FIX IT!

What we really do
Stacey Bradley
associate vice president
for administration
Student Affairs and Academic Support
Our division operating budget is the about the
same size as:
A.
B.
C.
D.

Arts and Sc...
Student Affairs and Academic Support
Our division has more employees than:
A. Scana?
B. BMW?
C. Dorn VA Medical Center?
Student Affairs and Academic Support
2013-2014 Operating Budget
2.0%
7.0%
9.0%

Auxiliary Enterprises (B Funds)
Tuition & ...
University of South Carolina - Columbia
2013-2014 Operating Budget

10.1%

15.6%
Auxiliary Enterprises

23.5%

Tuition & F...
Capital Planning
• State CPIP Process now 5 years
• University 5-year capital plan
• Division 5-year capital plan
– $190 m...
Things I Do That Won’t Surprise You:
Finance:
Division budget development, budget management,
resource requests, universit...
Formal Ways in Which I Represent Division:
• Data Administration
Advisory Committee

• HR Partners Group

• Capital Operat...
Things You May Not Know I Do:
• Annual Tuition Cost Study
• Title IX Review of Sexual
Assault Response
Procedures
• Underg...
Tasks I will not do:
The more I learn, the better I can represent our
division and the needs of our students
Lisa Jerald
student ombudsman
and assistant to
the vice president
What is a Student Ombudsman?
• om-buhdz-muhn
• Resource for students (faculty and staff)
• Assist in resolving university-...
What an Ombuds does
•
•
•
•
•
•

LISTEN
Discuss options
Explain university policy and procedure
Empower students to find t...
What an Ombuds Doesn’t Do
• Provide legal advice
http://www.sa.sc.edu/stlife/student-legalservices/
• Hear formal complain...
Just the Facts
spring
fall 2009 2010
TOTAL CASES

261

214

197

fall 2010

spring
2011
258

fall 2011

spring
2012

fall ...
Top 3 Unusual Calls
3. Room service
2. The “other” USC
1. Can you help me find my husband?
Maegan Gudridge
communications director
YOU
and our
STUDENTS
I’m a
writer/editor/designer/photographer
content wrangler/social media manager
researcher/information curator/adviser
con...
The Gamecock
Guarantee is one of
the most important
things USC does!

Call
Melissa
Gentry!

Employers want the skills
stud...
http://flic.kr/p/9o5AEY
I get to learn
about so many things
I represent the division on
a number of committees
I rely on you
to help me know
what I need to know
so that I can share it
in the right way
with the right people
at the right time
for our
STUDENTS
Pam Bowers
associate vice president
for planning, assessment
and innovation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NQuMr45xd4
Core Functions:
• Access –
recruitment, enrollment, transition
• Student progress & persistence
• Learning
• Citizenship a...
PAIC
Planning, Assessment & Innovation Council
•
•
•
•
•

Amber Fallucca
Jimmie Gahagan
Nicole Knutson
Student Life
Elizab...
Student Affairs & Academic Support
Mission: Collaborate with campus and external constituents to provide access, facilitat...
MISSION: Purpose
SAAS Planning, Assessment & Innovation
WHY / MISSION:
Improve division effectiveness and demonstrate
accountability by gui...
SAAS Planning, Assessment & Innovation
VISION:
Systematic planning and assessment
practices inform data-driven improvement...
CORE FUNCTIONS / Initiatives

HOW
Astin’s I-E-O Model
ENVIRONMENT
• PAIC

• Blueprints for Excellence
• Engagement Data system
• Division Directors meetings...
How do we measure
effectiveness?
Astin’s I-E-O Model
ENVIRONMENT
• PAIC

• Blueprints for Excellence
• Engagement Data system
• Division Directors meetings...
The goal is to score runs. The first step in scoring
runs is getting on base, so let’s have a statistic that
measures gett...
ENVIRONMENT
• PAIC
• Blueprints for Excellence
• Engagement Data system
• Division Directors meetings

Indicators of Effec...
If you don’t look good, we don’t look good.
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President
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  • Partnership with S.C. Legal Services – landlord/tenant issues, domestic relations
  • WHY DOES YOUR UNIT EXIST?WHAT DO YOU DO? (UNIQUE ROLE)WHO DO YOU SERVE?WHAT RESULTS DO YOU INTEND TO ACHIEVE?VERB, TARGET, OUTCOME – 8 WORDSMay not want to publish it in 8 words, but you should be able to explain the fundamental purpose in very few words. If you can’t be clear about why you exist, others may begin to wonder why the unit exists.
  • WHY DOES YOUR UNIT EXIST?WHAT DO YOU DO? (UNIQUE ROLE)WHO DO YOU SERVE?WHAT RESULTS DO YOU INTEND TO ACHIEVE?VERB, TARGET, OUTCOME – 8 WORDSMay not want to publish it in 8 words, but you should be able to explain the fundamental purpose in very few words. If you can’t be clear about why you exist, others may begin to wonder why the unit exists.
  • Astin’s Input-Environment-Outcomes Model for Assessment The Input-Environment-Outcome (I-E-O) model was developed by Alexander W. Astin (1993) as a guiding framework for assessments in higher education. The premise of this model is that educational assessments are not complete unless the evaluation includes information on student inputs (I), the educational environment (E), and student outcomes (O) (Astin, 1993). Inputs "refers to those personal qualities the student brings initially to the education program (including the student's initial level of developed talent at the time of entry)" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). Inputs also can be such things as antecedent conditions or performance pretests that function as control variables in research. Examples of student inputs might include demographic information, educational background, political orientation, behavior pattern, degree aspiration, reason for selecting an institution, financial status, disability status, career choice, major field of study, life goals, and reason for attending college (Astin, 1993). Inclusion of input data when using the I-E-O model is imperative because inputs directly influence both the environment and outputs, thus having a “double” influence on outputs—one that is direct and one that indirectly influences through environment (see Figure 1). Input data also can be used to examine influences that student inputs have on the environment; these input data could include gender, age, ethnic background, ability, and socioeconomic level. Environment "refers to the student's actual experiences during the educational program" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). The environment includes everything and anything that happens during the program course that might impact the student, and therefore the outcomes measured. Environmental items can includes those things such as educational experiences, practices, programs, or interventions. Additionally, some environmental factors may be antecedents (e.g. exposure to institution policies may occur before joining a college organization). Environmental factors may include the program, personnel, curricula, instructor, facilities, institutional climate, courses, teaching style, friends, roommates, extra-curricular activities, and organizational affiliation (Astin, 1993). When doing evaluative research, there are instances when environmental variables could be considered intervening outcomes variables, depending on how researchers use data in the analysis (e.g., moderator variables). Defining and assessing environmental variables can be an extremely challenging endeavor.Outcomes refer to the 'talents' we are trying to develop in our educational program" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). Outcomes are variables that may include posttests, consequences, or end results. In education, outcome measures have included indicators such as grade point average, exam scores, course performance, degree completion, and overall course satisfaction. Assessment for Excellence, Alexander W. Astin, 1993, Phoenix: The Oryx Press.
  • Holiday Greeting card from CollegiateLink / StudentVoice
  • Astin’s Input-Environment-Outcomes Model for Assessment The Input-Environment-Outcome (I-E-O) model was developed by Alexander W. Astin (1993) as a guiding framework for assessments in higher education. The premise of this model is that educational assessments are not complete unless the evaluation includes information on student inputs (I), the educational environment (E), and student outcomes (O) (Astin, 1993). Inputs "refers to those personal qualities the student brings initially to the education program (including the student's initial level of developed talent at the time of entry)" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). Inputs also can be such things as antecedent conditions or performance pretests that function as control variables in research. Examples of student inputs might include demographic information, educational background, political orientation, behavior pattern, degree aspiration, reason for selecting an institution, financial status, disability status, career choice, major field of study, life goals, and reason for attending college (Astin, 1993). Inclusion of input data when using the I-E-O model is imperative because inputs directly influence both the environment and outputs, thus having a “double” influence on outputs—one that is direct and one that indirectly influences through environment (see Figure 1). Input data also can be used to examine influences that student inputs have on the environment; these input data could include gender, age, ethnic background, ability, and socioeconomic level. Environment "refers to the student's actual experiences during the educational program" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). The environment includes everything and anything that happens during the program course that might impact the student, and therefore the outcomes measured. Environmental items can includes those things such as educational experiences, practices, programs, or interventions. Additionally, some environmental factors may be antecedents (e.g. exposure to institution policies may occur before joining a college organization). Environmental factors may include the program, personnel, curricula, instructor, facilities, institutional climate, courses, teaching style, friends, roommates, extra-curricular activities, and organizational affiliation (Astin, 1993). When doing evaluative research, there are instances when environmental variables could be considered intervening outcomes variables, depending on how researchers use data in the analysis (e.g., moderator variables). Defining and assessing environmental variables can be an extremely challenging endeavor.Outcomes refer to the 'talents' we are trying to develop in our educational program" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). Outcomes are variables that may include posttests, consequences, or end results. In education, outcome measures have included indicators such as grade point average, exam scores, course performance, degree completion, and overall course satisfaction. Assessment for Excellence, Alexander W. Astin, 1993, Phoenix: The Oryx Press.
  • Astin’s Input-Environment-Output Model for Assessment The Input-Environment-Outcome (I-E-O) model was developed by Alexander W. Astin (1993) as a guiding framework for assessments in higher education. The premise of this model is that educational assessments are not complete unless the evaluation includes information on student inputs (I), the educational environment (E), and student outcomes (O) (Astin, 1993). Inputs "refers to those personal qualities the student brings initially to the education program (including the student's initial level of developed talent at the time of entry)" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). Inputs also can be such things as antecedent conditions or performance pretests that function as control variables in research. Examples of student inputs might include demographic information, educational background, political orientation, behavior pattern, degree aspiration, reason for selecting an institution, financial status, disability status, career choice, major field of study, life goals, and reason for attending college (Astin, 1993). Inclusion of input data when using the I-E-O model is imperative because inputs directly influence both the environment and outputs, thus having a “double” influence on outputs—one that is direct and one that indirectly influences through environment (see Figure 1). Input data also can be used to examine influences that student inputs have on the environment; these input data could include gender, age, ethnic background, ability, and socioeconomic level. Environment "refers to the student's actual experiences during the educational program" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). The environment includes everything and anything that happens during the program course that might impact the student, and therefore the outcomes measured. Environmental items can includes those things such as educational experiences, practices, programs, or interventions. Additionally, some environmental factors may be antecedents (e.g. exposure to institution policies may occur before joining a college organization). Environmental factors may include the program, personnel, curricula, instructor, facilities, institutional climate, courses, teaching style, friends, roommates, extra-curricular activities, and organizational affiliation (Astin, 1993). When doing evaluative research, there are instances when environmental variables could be considered intervening outcomes variables, depending on how researchers use data in the analysis (e.g., moderator variables). Defining and assessing environmental variables can be an extremely challenging endeavor.Outputs "refer to the 'talents' we are trying to develop in our educational program" (Astin, 1993, p. 18). Outputs are outcome variables that may include posttests, consequences, or end results. In education, outcome measures have included indicators such as grade point average, exam scores, course performance, degree completion, and overall course satisfaction. Assessment for Excellence, Alexander W. Astin, 1993, Phoenix: The Oryx Press.
  • Nov. 22, 2013 Student Affairs and Academic Support meeting: the Office of the Vice President

    1. 1. What do you guys DO back there? the Office of the Vice President Division of Student Affairs and Academic Support
    2. 2. What our families think we do
    3. 3. What some of you think we do
    4. 4. What we feel like we do
    5. 5. What we wish we did
    6. 6. FIX IT! What we really do
    7. 7. Stacey Bradley associate vice president for administration
    8. 8. Student Affairs and Academic Support Our division operating budget is the about the same size as: A. B. C. D. Arts and Sciences School of Medicine - Columbia Athletics None of the Above
    9. 9. Student Affairs and Academic Support Our division has more employees than: A. Scana? B. BMW? C. Dorn VA Medical Center?
    10. 10. Student Affairs and Academic Support 2013-2014 Operating Budget 2.0% 7.0% 9.0% Auxiliary Enterprises (B Funds) Tuition & Fees Supported (A Funds) 21.0% 61.0% Sales and Service (E Funds) Grants, Contracts, Gifts (F Funds) Student Activity Fees (D Funds)
    11. 11. University of South Carolina - Columbia 2013-2014 Operating Budget 10.1% 15.6% Auxiliary Enterprises 23.5% Tuition & Fees Sales and Service Grants, Contracts, Gifts 47.9% 3.0% State Appropriations
    12. 12. Capital Planning • State CPIP Process now 5 years • University 5-year capital plan • Division 5-year capital plan – $190 million of renovation & new construction – Sample of projects included: • Bates, Bates West, Capstone, Cliff Apts, Legare Pinkney, Rutledge, E. Quad, S. Quad, S. Tower, Woodrow, New Student Health Center, Thompson, Intramural Fields, Blatt, RHUU, Greek Village, Lieber, McKissick
    13. 13. Things I Do That Won’t Surprise You: Finance: Division budget development, budget management, resource requests, university scholarship budget HR: Review/approve all division HR actions, manage HR issues Management: Supervise our amazing central office team (Finance/HR, IT, Communications, Ombuds)
    14. 14. Formal Ways in Which I Represent Division: • Data Administration Advisory Committee • HR Partners Group • Capital Operations • Orientation Design Planning Sub-Committee Advisory Committee • First-Year Study Group
    15. 15. Things You May Not Know I Do: • Annual Tuition Cost Study • Title IX Review of Sexual Assault Response Procedures • Undergraduate Scholarship Budget • Student Legal Services Contract • Dept of Justice Agreement • Stamps Scholars Proposal • Rating Agency Updates • Supervisor Training, GEMS • ACA and Student Employment • Drafting of Policy for Grad Fellowships, Scholarships, A batements • Gamecock Gateway Fee Structure • RFP Evaluation Team for New Student Advising System
    16. 16. Tasks I will not do:
    17. 17. The more I learn, the better I can represent our division and the needs of our students
    18. 18. Lisa Jerald student ombudsman and assistant to the vice president
    19. 19. What is a Student Ombudsman? • om-buhdz-muhn • Resource for students (faculty and staff) • Assist in resolving university-related problems and concerns in an informal manner • An ombudsman is not an advocate
    20. 20. What an Ombuds does • • • • • • LISTEN Discuss options Explain university policy and procedure Empower students to find their own solutions Notify faculty of a student’s absence Recommend changes to policy and procedure
    21. 21. What an Ombuds Doesn’t Do • Provide legal advice http://www.sa.sc.edu/stlife/student-legalservices/ • Hear formal complaints • Facilitate grade changes or medical withdrawals
    22. 22. Just the Facts spring fall 2009 2010 TOTAL CASES 261 214 197 fall 2010 spring 2011 258 fall 2011 spring 2012 fall 2012 spring 2013 297 299 254 224 academic 37 32 32 52 57 46 45 51 financial 35 17 31 29 31 16 28 19 absence notice 75 65 54 76 77 79 74 56 withdrawal 20 23 17 28 37 45 33 19 student 84 76 87 108 123 127 104 76 parent 112 80 85 88 107 110 97 87 other 65 41 42 62 67 62 52 60 CONTACTED BY
    23. 23. Top 3 Unusual Calls 3. Room service 2. The “other” USC 1. Can you help me find my husband?
    24. 24. Maegan Gudridge communications director
    25. 25. YOU and our STUDENTS
    26. 26. I’m a writer/editor/designer/photographer content wrangler/social media manager researcher/information curator/adviser connection-maker/unlicensed therapist doer of whatever needs to be done
    27. 27. The Gamecock Guarantee is one of the most important things USC does! Call Melissa Gentry! Employers want the skills students develop in beyondthe-classroom experiences!
    28. 28. http://flic.kr/p/9o5AEY
    29. 29. I get to learn about so many things
    30. 30. I represent the division on a number of committees
    31. 31. I rely on you to help me know what I need to know
    32. 32. so that I can share it in the right way with the right people at the right time
    33. 33. for our STUDENTS
    34. 34. Pam Bowers associate vice president for planning, assessment and innovation
    35. 35. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NQuMr45xd4
    36. 36. Core Functions: • Access – recruitment, enrollment, transition • Student progress & persistence • Learning • Citizenship and leadership
    37. 37. PAIC Planning, Assessment & Innovation Council • • • • • Amber Fallucca Jimmie Gahagan Nicole Knutson Student Life Elizabeth Orehovec • • • • • Claire Robinson Dallin Young Dennis Pruitt Donald Miles Pam Bowers
    38. 38. Student Affairs & Academic Support Mission: Collaborate with campus and external constituents to provide access, facilitate students’ progress and persistence, advance learning, and shape responsible citizens and future leaders. Goals • Manage the comprehensive and collaborative efforts of the university to meet student enrollment goals, and provide essential programs and services to recruit and enroll new freshmen and transfer students and facilitate their successful transition to the university. • Improve student progress and persistence to degree completion by increasing student engagement in campus life and by providing and supporting essential programs, services, and educational activities that lead to student success and satisfaction. • Collaborate with campus and external constituents to provide essential programs and services that advance learning, at the university and in the higher education community. • Provide essential programs and services that shape responsible citizens and develop future leaders, in collaboration with university, community and external partners.
    39. 39. MISSION: Purpose
    40. 40. SAAS Planning, Assessment & Innovation WHY / MISSION: Improve division effectiveness and demonstrate accountability by guiding department planning, assessment and innovation efforts. Verb: guide PAI efforts (unique role) Target: departments/units Outcome: division effectiveness, accountability
    41. 41. SAAS Planning, Assessment & Innovation VISION: Systematic planning and assessment practices inform data-driven improvement and efficient use of resources; this continuous improvement process is clearly documented in each department blueprint.
    42. 42. CORE FUNCTIONS / Initiatives HOW
    43. 43. Astin’s I-E-O Model ENVIRONMENT • PAIC • Blueprints for Excellence • Engagement Data system • Division Directors meetings INPUT • 6 AVP areas; 42 departments/units • Varying levels of planning and assessment expertise, urgency • Wide range of intended outcomes OUTCOMES  Meet target enrollment numbers (recruitment, enrollment, transition)  Improve progress and persistence  Advance learning  Advance civic engagement and leadership development
    44. 44. How do we measure effectiveness?
    45. 45. Astin’s I-E-O Model ENVIRONMENT • PAIC • Blueprints for Excellence • Engagement Data system • Division Directors meetings INPUT • 6 AVP areas; 42 departments/units • Varying levels of planning and assessment expertise, urgency • Wide range of intended outcomes OUTCOMES  Meet target enrollment numbers (recruitment, enrollment, transition)  Improve progress and persistence  Advance learning  Advance civic engagement and leadership development
    46. 46. The goal is to score runs. The first step in scoring runs is getting on base, so let’s have a statistic that measures getting on base . . .
    47. 47. ENVIRONMENT • PAIC • Blueprints for Excellence • Engagement Data system • Division Directors meetings Indicators of Effectiveness  Measures of blueprint quality  Measure of blueprint participation INPUTS INPUTS  Measure of relevance of information provided in blueprints • 6 AVP areas; 42 departments/units  Measure of data-driven culture • Varying levels of planning, assessment expertise, sense of urgency • Wide range of outcomes Division OUTCOMES Astin’s I-E-O Model (modified) • Meet target enrollment numbers (recruitment, enrollment, transition) • Improve persistence / progress rates • Advance learning • Develop good citizens and leaders
    48. 48. If you don’t look good, we don’t look good.

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