The increasing
internationalisation of
European research
Chloë Somers
Research Councils UK
26 June 2013
Why international engagement?
• Strategic approach to international
co-operation helps:
– develop (access to) large-scale ...
RCUK Overseas
• UK Research Office (UKRO)
(established 1984 and located in Brussels, to
promote UK participation in EU pro...
Role of the Overseas Teams
• Gather intelligence on the strategic and
research priorities of major overseas funding
agenci...
EU drivers for international
co-operation
• EU’s drivers to engage in international
cooperation (as a single entity) are:
...
Support available
• Institutional support
• UK funding
– within grants
– partnering awards
– joint calls
• ‘Money Follows ...
Internationalising European
research: key issues
• Must be seen as extension of existing activities,
rather than separate
...
Council conclusions: May 2013
• Underlines the importance of preparing
“multi-annual roadmaps for co-operation with the EU...
EU activities: looking ahead
• EU instruments have allowed Member States to
experiment ambitiously with bilateral and
mult...
Example: ERA-CAPs
• Co-ordinating Action in Plant Sciences
• 3 year ERA-Net, started 2011
• Built on success of ERA-Plant ...
Example: FACCE JPI
Belmont
Forum
+
FACCE-JPI
Multiscalar interactions for
drivers of Food Security
and Land-use Change€1.7...
Example: Open Research Area
• Agreement launched in 2009 between funders in UK, FR,
DE, NL, USA providing joint funding fo...
Science Europe
• 51 Science Europe member organisations from 26
countries
• Science Europe represents funders and performe...
Science Europe: international
outlook
• Ideal forum to work with international partners as
a collaborative ‘bloc’
• Facili...
Thank you!
http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/international/
chloe.somers@rcuk.ac.uk
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Chloe Somers - increasing internationalisation of European Research

  1. 1. The increasing internationalisation of European research Chloë Somers Research Councils UK 26 June 2013
  2. 2. Why international engagement? • Strategic approach to international co-operation helps: – develop (access to) large-scale high quality facilities – increase mobility – build capacity – knowledge exchange – enhance impact of research publications – increase inward investment – tackle ‘grand challenges’
  3. 3. RCUK Overseas • UK Research Office (UKRO) (established 1984 and located in Brussels, to promote UK participation in EU programmes - first European country to do this) HEI and counterpart subscribers • RCUK China (2007) • RCUK US (2007) • RCUK India (2008)
  4. 4. Role of the Overseas Teams • Gather intelligence on the strategic and research priorities of major overseas funding agencies and institutions • Build partnerships with overseas funding agencies to align strategic priorities and set the scene for sustainable joint research programmes • Help to overcome institutional barriers and to form productive relationships with the research base • Increase the RCUK presence and work with other UK stakeholders in-county to promote UK research and its impact
  5. 5. EU drivers for international co-operation • EU’s drivers to engage in international cooperation (as a single entity) are: – support to policy dialogue and priority setting – capacity building – networking and partnership building – “speak with one voice” – set common rules and regulations – support capabilities in developing countries with more impacts due to opportunities of scale – assessment and monitoring – dissemination and outreach
  6. 6. Support available • Institutional support • UK funding – within grants – partnering awards – joint calls • ‘Money Follows Researcher’ • ‘Money Follows Co-operation’ • Lead Agency agreements • Bilateral/multilateral programmes • European Union funding
  7. 7. Internationalising European research: key issues • Must be seen as extension of existing activities, rather than separate • Principle of variable geometry must be applied • Recognition of differences between research communities • Alignment of policy with funding (e.g. SET plan) • Need to remain agile and responsive • No compromise on excellence • Any strategy must be developed in partnership
  8. 8. Council conclusions: May 2013 • Underlines the importance of preparing “multi-annual roadmaps for co-operation with the EU's strategic partners, which will identify priorities and instruments for activities within Horizon 2020 for international co-operation on research and innovation.” • States that Member States must be involved from an early stage in this process • Calls on the Commission to present the first roadmaps by the end of 2013
  9. 9. EU activities: looking ahead • EU instruments have allowed Member States to experiment ambitiously with bilateral and multilateral collaboration for many years • Approaches becoming common practice • Underpinning success of ERA • Demonstrate to international partners experience of working collaboratively – ERA-Nets: RCUK involved in 20+ current ERA- Nets – Joint Programming Initiatives (JPIs): UK involved in all ten JPIs
  10. 10. Example: ERA-CAPs • Co-ordinating Action in Plant Sciences • 3 year ERA-Net, started 2011 • Built on success of ERA-Plant Genomics • Arose from need to develop EU-wide plant science research structure • 19 partners, inc. Canada and New Zealand • 7 observers, inc. India, Japan, USA • 1st joint call: – 110 proposals – 500 research teams – 21 European and non-European countries
  11. 11. Example: FACCE JPI Belmont Forum + FACCE-JPI Multiscalar interactions for drivers of Food Security and Land-use Change€1.75M BBSRC ESRC NERC €10M +In-kind 14 Funders Alignment and added value: national to global scales
  12. 12. Example: Open Research Area • Agreement launched in 2009 between funders in UK, FR, DE, NL, USA providing joint funding for researchers • Grew out of NORFACE ERA-Net (launched 2004) • NSF joined in 2012 for third call • ORA principles used to support wider international collaboration with India and China (in development) – First Indian-European Social Science Research Networking project launched in Aug 2012: six projects awarded funding – Early discussion with the NSF (China) about a possible thematic call based on the ORA model – Thematic Open Research Area in Social Media: discussions to develop joint activities with European ORA members
  13. 13. Science Europe • 51 Science Europe member organisations from 26 countries • Science Europe represents funders and performers • Promotes collective interests of members • Promotes co-operation at policy and activity level: – 6 Scientific Committees – Working Groups on key policy areas (e.g. cross-border collaboration) • Professor Paul Boyle, RCUK International Champion, is currently President of Science Europe
  14. 14. Science Europe: international outlook • Ideal forum to work with international partners as a collaborative ‘bloc’ • Facility to collaborate while retaining diversity • Bottom-up approach • Importance of engaging internationally with many key issues: open access, research integrity, data… • Role on Global Research Council
  15. 15. Thank you! http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/international/ chloe.somers@rcuk.ac.uk

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