introduction to java-final with Unit Nexus

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Unit Nexus is providing Java training in Chandigarh.

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introduction to java-final with Unit Nexus

  1. 1. Introduction to Java Session 1
  2. 2. Introduction to Java / 2 of 28 Objectives  Discuss Java in brief  Explore the types of Java programs  Discuss what we can do with Java?  Examine the differences between Applets and Applications  Describe the Java Virtual Machine (JVM)  Explore the features of some IDE’s  Discuss the JDK and tools under it  Discuss future trends and technologies  Discuss the brief history of Java
  3. 3. Introduction to Java / 3 of 28 Introduction to Java  Java being secure, portable and platform independent was found to be capable of addressing large scale problems across the Internet  Introduced in 1995 by Sun Microsystems  Objective was to develop a software for embedding in consumer electronic devices  Initially called ‘Oak’  Internet users had problems of portability and platform independence
  4. 4. Introduction to Java / 4 of 28 What is Java?  A cross platform language  It is used for stand-alone applications, net based programs and to program consumer devices  For e.g.: cellular phones, palm pilots  An object-oriented programming language
  5. 5. Introduction to Java / 5 of 28 Java and the internet  Applets can respond to user input and actions  Programs on the Net are either static or dynamic  Applets help develop dynamic programs  Applets run on Java enabled web browser
  6. 6. Introduction to Java / 6 of 28 Security issues (1)  This can be a potential risk for the user’s system  An Applet has to be downloaded on the user’s system before it can work  Hence, applets are restricted from accessing all areas of the disk
  7. 7. Introduction to Java / 7 of 28 Security issues (2)  JVM generates byte codes as a result of compilation  Byte codes cannot be executed without the JVM  This control is exercised by the
  8. 8. Introduction to Java / 8 of 28 Types of Java programs (1)  Applets  Programs created specially to work with the Internet Displays an image GUI to accept user input
  9. 9. Introduction to Java / 9 of 28 Types of Java programs (2)  Command line applications  Java programs that run from a command prompt and do not display any GUI screen
  10. 10. Introduction to Java / 10 of 28 Types of Java programs (3)  GUI Applications  Java programs that run stand-alone and accept user input through a GUI based screen
  11. 11. Introduction to Java / 11 of 28 Types of Java programs (4)  Client sends request which is processed by the server  The server side APIs extend capabilities of standard APIs and are known as Servlets  Also called server side applets  For e.g. – HTML form processing, process databases and perform server side transactions  Servlets  Suitable for web based n-tier application development
  12. 12. Introduction to Java / 12 of 28 Types of Java programs (5)  A programmer can create his/her own packages or use the built-in packages  java.awt, java.io and java.applet are some examples  Database applications  Uses JDBC API for database connectivity  Programs can be either applets or application  Packages  Class libraries in Java
  13. 13. Introduction to Java / 13 of 28 What can we do with Java?  Colorful scrolling banner for web pages  Interactive quiz  A program that plays audio, displays a banner and animates images at the same time  Interactive games that can run as stand alone or deployed on the web  One can develop:  Create a wide variety of applications from a simple computation program to complex distributed application
  14. 14. Introduction to Java / 14 of 28 Difference between Applets and Applications (1)  Do not need a browser to execute  These run within JVM  Executed in a java compatible web browser  Applets load and run on a Java-enabled web browser Applications Applets
  15. 15. Introduction to Java / 15 of 28 Difference between Applets and Applications (2)  Manages its own flow of execution  No restrictions about reading or writing from/to the local file system  Flow of execution is partly managed by the browser context  Cannot read/write from/to the local file system Applications Applets
  16. 16. Introduction to Java / 16 of 28 Similarities in Applets and Applications (1)  Both can use the Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT)  Both need to use the standard Java class libraries
  17. 17. Introduction to Java / 17 of 28 Java Virtual Machine (JVM)  Java code can run on any platform by using JVM  JVM normally reads and executes Java statements one at a time  JVM is responsible for platform independence and small size compiled code  Recognizes only a particular binary format called a class file  Has an interpreter component that enables communication between Java byte code and a computer’s operating system
  18. 18. Introduction to Java / 18 of 28 Visual development tools  Simplifies the software development process  Includes class browser for viewing and navigating through the class hierarchy  Includes a source code editor that helps code programs  Helps in quick and efficient development of Java applications and applets
  19. 19. Introduction to Java / 19 of 28 Some visual development tools  Borland Jbuilder from Borland/Inprise  Includes an integrated editor, debugger, compiler, visual designer, wizards and sample applications  Forte for Java, Community Edition from Sun Microsystems  Integrated visual design, editing, compilation and debugging capabilities to create applets and applications  Visual Age for Java from IBM  Works with existing databases, applications and transactions
  20. 20. Introduction to Java / 20 of 28 Java Development Kit (JDK)  Basically a set of command line tools  Three major releases are :  Java 1.0 – first release  Java 1.1 – 1997 release  Java 2 – latest release  Freely available at Sun’s official website  Contains the software and tools needed to compile, debug and execute applets and applications
  21. 21. Introduction to Java / 21 of 28 Tools under JDK (1)  Syntax : javac [option] source  Source files end with extension .java  Options can include –  -classpath  -d  -g  -o  -verbose  javac : compiler used to compile Java source code
  22. 22. Introduction to Java / 22 of 28 Tools under JDK (2)  java [option] classname [arguments]  Options can include  -classpath  -Dname name  -help  -v or –verbose  -X  java : interpreter used to execute Java byte codes
  23. 23. Introduction to Java / 23 of 28 Tools under JDK (3)  javadoc : This is the Java documentation tool  Generates detailed documentation in HTML form for any .java source code or package  appletviewer : Used to view and test applets  Syntax : appletviewer [options] url
  24. 24. Introduction to Java / 24 of 28 New features in Java2 (1)  Drag and Drop – interactively transferring information across different applications and from one part of a program’s interface to another  Swing – new set of classes and interfaces used to create an advanced GUI
  25. 25. Introduction to Java / 25 of 28 New features in Java2 (2)  Java Sound – totally new set of features pertaining to Java’s audio features  RMI – Remote Method Invocation allows applications to call objects located at remote sites and communicate with them  Java 2D API – set of classes for advanced 2D graphics and imaging
  26. 26. Introduction to Java / 26 of 28 Present Java technologies (1)  Support for distributed computing in the form of features such as RMI  Database management support in the form of JDBC  Reusable software components in the form of JavaBeans  Creation and deployment of applications that can run on any operating system
  27. 27. Introduction to Java / 27 of 28 Present Java technologies (2)  Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) which includes :
  28. 28. Introduction to Java / 28 of 28 Future trends  Miniature devices such as Palm pilots and mobile phones are equipped with a features such as email, gaming options and many others  They are based upon Java 2 Micro Edition (J2ME)  New products in the area of embedded technologies for consumer devices by making use of mobile computing

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