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EeNET: development and lessons

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A presentation at AfgREN-WS-6 in Dubai on May 10, 2014 - describing the progress of Internet in Estonia and giving some ideas for developing online infrastructure in Afghanistan.

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EeNET: development and lessons

  1. 1. EeNET: development and lessons Kaido Kikkas AfgREN-WS-6 May 9-11, 2014 c Kaido Kikkas 2014. This document is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 (or newer) Estonia license.
  2. 2. Estonia: a little fact sheet Located here: ~45k sq km ~1M people Since 1918/1991 EU, NATO, €, Schengen
  3. 3. Estonia vs Afghanistan Different Size, terrain and location language(s) and ethnic diversity Period of stability Similar Some points in history Rapid changes International cooperation Limited resources Emphasis on education Better technology than expected
  4. 4. EeNET – the Estonian NREN: a timeline 1993 – the beginning (MoCE) 1994 – first broadband connection to a school; 15 HE facilities connected 1995 – Tallinn-Helsinki 256 kbps; ~1500 connected computers; Tiger Leap 1996 - MoE; cleanup among customers; first domestic backbones (Tallinn-Tartu 256 kbit, others 64 or less); EeNET joins TERENA
  5. 5. ... 1998 – 305 facilities connected 1999 – Tallinn-Tartu 8 Mbps 2000 – ATM 20Mbps, Tallinn-Tartu 16 Mps (others less); 542 connected facilities; IPv6 connection to Sweden; beginning of GÉANT 2001 – Tallinn-Tartu 80 Mbps; FOSS use 2002 – 100 Mbit optical cables to 23 educational facilities in Tartu as well as all major universities
  6. 6. ... 2003 – ATM 155 Mbps 2004 – outer link 622 Mbps, Tallinn-Tartu 1 Gbps; 25k domains in .ee 2005 – 1 Gbit connections to many HE facilities; BalticGrid; Eduroam; GÉANT2 2006 – some paid services; outer link 1Gbps 2007 – nature cameras; 50k .ee domains 2008 – outer link 2.4 Gpbs; BalticGrid II; HAVIKE – FOSS SaaS for education
  7. 7. ... 2010 – Tallinn-Tartu 10 Gbps; 79k+ .ee domains transferred to EIF 2011 – outer link 5 Gbps 2012 – outer link 10 Gbps, major upgrade to domestic backbones (1 to 10 Gbps); TAAT authentication service 2013 – EeNET turns 20; EITSA + TLF + EeNET = HITSA
  8. 8. EeNET 2014 4 sections (general, networks, services, grid) with 22 employees Service agreements with 1027 facilities (education, research, culture; a few local authorities (mostly served by ASO) Backbone: 1200km in Estonia + 100 km to Espoo (near Helsinki) Up to 10 Gbps channels HAVIKE: Joomla, WordPress, Moodle, MediaWiki and LimeSurvey; 570 sites
  9. 9. ... 610 websites 1300 mailing lists 600 .ee domains 7000 mailboxes 302 TCS certs 10 hosted servers
  10. 10. Besides EeNET National ID-card infrastructure (authentication + digital signatures) e-voting emta.ee – Tax and Customs Authority ois.ee – a Learning Management System service by HITSA OER (supported by HITSA) and FOSS Moodle – de facto LMS standard Echo360 lecture recording service I-Tee distance lab system (under dev)
  11. 11. Things to consider Rapid changes, flexibility, new tech Open standards FOSS as a major focus; CC framework E-learning Net neutrality Open market, lack of monopolies
  12. 12. Things to avoid Computers vs networks – for a while, THF focused on delivering computers instead of networks Lack of training: specialists (“I only know N!”) users (“where is this button?”) Closed standards and systems, vendor lock-in (the Microsoft lesson) Neglect of security and safety (especially among youth)
  13. 13. Thank you! These slides will be available under CC BY- SA at http://www.slideshare.net/UncleOwl Also, many thanks to EeNET for hosting a bunch of visitors on April 22 and sharing a lot of data that ended up in these slides.

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