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Open license playbook CCCOER webinar

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Open licensing of instructional materials such as textbooks, videos, and other related resources makes possible free sharing and remixing which reduces cost barriers for students. Creative Commons provides the legal infrastructure for easily sharing creative works including instructional materials but how do the different creative commons licenses indicate a resource can be re-used. Join us for an interactive session of playbook license scenarios where you can test your knowledge of the allowed OER re-use based on license type.

Please join the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) for our October webinar:

When: Oct 12, 10amPST/1pmEST

Featured Speakers:
Quill West, OER Program Manager, Pierce College District
Cable Green, Director of Open Education, Creative Commons

Published in: Education
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Open license playbook CCCOER webinar

  1. 1. Open Licensing Playbook Quill West, Pierce College District Cable Green, Creative Commons Oct 12, 2016, 10:00 am PST Unless otherwise indicated, this presentation is licensed CC-BY 4.0
  2. 2. Collaborate Window Overview Audio & Video Participants Chat Tech Support available at: 1-760-744-1150 ext. 1537, 1554
  3. 3. Agenda • Introductions • CCCOER Overview • Open Licensing Playbook • Stay in the Loop • Q & A Image Front Page Attribution: OpenSource.com CC-BY-SA 3.0 via Flickr
  4. 4. Welcome Please introduce yourself in the chat window Moderator: Una Daly, Director CCCOER Open Education Consortium Cable Green Director Global Learning Creative Commons Former CCCOER President 2010-11 Quill West OER Project Manager Pierce College District CCCOER Advisory Board President
  5. 5. • Expand access to high- quality open materials • Support faculty choice and development • Improve student success CCCOER Mission http://oerconsortium.org Come In, We're Open gary simmons cc-by-nc-sa flickr
  6. 6. 250+ Colleges in 21 States & Provinces
  7. 7. Understanding Open Licenses …
  8. 8. Playbook Open Licensing Join us on Twitter: @cccoer #OER #cccoer
  9. 9. Playbook Open Licensing Quill West @quill_west Cable Green @cgreen "Cable Green on the scene" by David Kindler is licensed under CC BY 2.0 Join us on Twitter: @cccoer #OER #cccoer
  10. 10. LOCATE THE POLLING FEATURE It should appear under your name.
  11. 11. LET’S TRY IT A. I’m pretty confident about open licensing. I came to reinforce what I know. B. I’ve heard of open licensing. I really like the Creative Commons videos, but I don’t feel like I can apply the licenses. C. I’m an author. I want to apply a license, but I have questions. D. I’m responsible for helping people selecting and using OER, but I worry that I’m getting it wrong when interpreting the licenses. Help!
  12. 12. QUESTIONS ARE NORMAL "What?" by wonderferret is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  13. 13. QUESTIONS ARE NORMAL "What?" by wonderferret is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  14. 14. QUESTIONS ARE NORMAL "What?" by wonderferret is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  15. 15. Consider Your Plans Local We can rely somewhat on fair use. Library materials are paid for, so accessible. We can make changes fairly easily. Sharing Fair Use is less applicable, because of distribution. Try to think of “downstream” users. Subscription materials are not available everywhere. Grants The funder may have restrictions. Greater need for adaptation work. Downstream users matter a lot.
  16. 16. Consider Your Plans Local We can rely somewhat on fair use. Library materials are paid for, so accessible. We can make changes fairly easily. Sharing Fair Use is less applicable, because of distribution. Try to think of “downstream” users. Subscription materials are not available everywhere. Grants The funder may have restrictions. Greater need for adaptation work. Downstream users matter a lot.
  17. 17. From Here on ◈ Elements of licenses ◈ Present each license ◈ Audience Poll Please put questions in the chat window. We’ll take them at the end.
  18. 18. Elements of Licenses The 4 elements work together to create the 6 licenses. If you remember the elements, the licenses are easier to interpret. Attribution Share-Alike No- Derivative NonCommercial
  19. 19. Versions The numbers following a CC license (e.g. 2.0, 3.0, 4.0) refer to the license version. Kind of like software, there are different release dates for licenses. Important updates are covered on the Creative Commons Wiki.
  20. 20. From here on we’re talking about CC 4.0.
  21. 21. The Licenses
  22. 22. Remix and CC Licenses
  23. 23. "CC License Compatibility Chart" by Kennisland is in the Public Domain, CC0
  24. 24. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 ❖ Give credit to the original author. ❖ Link to the original. ❖ Best practice to mention major changes from the original. Attribution is a requirement on all six licenses.
  25. 25. SELECT THE ATTRIBUTION YOU WOULD USE C. “Chemistry” by OpenStax is licensed CC-BY 4.0. B. OpenStax, Chemistry. OpenStax CNX. Jun 20, 2016 http://cnx.org/contents/85abf193- 2bd2-4908-8563- 90b8a7ac8df6@9.311 D. Materials on this page are from OpenStax Chemistry. A. “Open Textbook” presentation by Quill West use CC-BY 4.0, including “Chemistry” by OpenStax.
  26. 26. Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 4.0 ❖ Any derivative must be released with the same (or a compatible) license.
  27. 27. Can I remix a CC-BY-SA image with text that is CC-BY-NC? A. Yes, because both the image and text are CC licensed. B. No, because you can’t mix BY-SA with BY-NC (they aren’t compatible). The remixed work has to be BY-SA. C. It’s borderline, but you could do it as long as you state in the finished work that some work isn’t BY- SA. D. You could do it if you got permission from the person holding the BY-NC licensed text, but you must tell them that the remix will be licensed BY-SA.
  28. 28. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 ❖ Cannot be used for commercial purposes or monetary compensation.
  29. 29. Should we sell NC licensed materials in our Bookstore? A. Absolutely not; non- commercial is pretty clear. Don’t sell it, period. B. It’s okay, as long as you are only recuperating costs, not making a profit. C. No one really knows, so it is probably best to ask your lawyer’s advice. D. It’s probably best to ask the copyright holder for permission to reproduce and distribute the work through your Bookstore.
  30. 30. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike 4.0 ❖ Cannot be used for commercial purposes or monetary compensation. ❖ Any derivative must be released with the same (or a compatible) license.
  31. 31. Is the CC-BY-NC-SA license compatible with any other license? A. Yep, the CC-BY and CC- BY-SA license are perfectly compatible. B. Pretty much only the CC- BY license works with CC- BY-NC-SA. C. No way. The CC-BY-NC- SA stands alone. D. The CC-BY-NC and the CC-BY license are compatible with the CC- BY-NC-SA license.
  32. 32. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Derivative 4.0 ❖ Cannot distribute a modified version. ❖ Different format does not mean a modification.
  33. 33. Does adding captions to a video make it a derivative work? A. Yes, because you changed the video. B. No, because you’ve only enhanced the original. C. Yes, but it is okay because the captions are added for accessibility reasons. D. It depends on how the captions are added. Some services, like Amara, add captions by putting a mask over the original- this isn’t a derivative.
  34. 34. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Non- Derivative 4.0 ❖ Cannot be used for commercial purposes or monetary compensation. ❖ Cannot distribute a derivative work.
  35. 35. I found an CC-BY-NC-ND website, but I want to print it and give it to students. Can I reformat it for printing? A. No. Non-Derivative means you can’t change it at all. B. It’s fine because the license permits changes of a technical nature to support new formats. C. Grey area. You could get away with it, but couldn’t recommend it to others. D. Don’t mess with that ND licensed stuff. It isn’t really OER, so just ignore it.
  36. 36. Is it a Remix or a Collection?  A remix is a blending of two things.  A collection might put two works side by side. Is it appropriate to put a non-derivative work into a collection next to CC-BY Licensed work? A. Yes, as long as the non- derivative work isn’t changed. B. No, because shifting it to a collection means you’ve made a derivative.
  37. 37. Some Final words on Creative Commons Licenses. ◈ Openly licensed work is still copyrighted. ◈ When in doubt, ask the owner. ◈ It’s worth your time to read the legal code some time. ◈ Remember downstream users. "Nuf Ced Button" by Boston Public Library is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  38. 38. Don’t forget to join our list.
  39. 39. Cable Green @cgreen Quill West @quill_west CCCOER @cccoer 40 "Creative Commons - cc stickers" by Kristina Alexanderson is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  40. 40. CREDITS Special thanks to all the people who made and released these awesome resources for free: ◈ Presentation template by SlidesCarnival 41
  41. 41. Stay in the Loop • Upcoming Conferences – Open Ed 2016 Conference - Nov 2-4 – Open Ed Global Cape Town - Mar 8-10, 2017 • Open Access Week Oct 24-29 • CCCOER Advisory Meeting Oct 26 – Follow-up discussion on open licensing
  42. 42. OpenEd16 CCCOER Showcases • Nov 9, 10am PST, 1pm EST Hear a recap of some of the exciting OpenEd16 presentations by CCCOER Leaders. • Featured Speakers: – To Be Announced
  43. 43. Thank you for coming! Contact Info: Quill West: @quill_west Cable Green: @cable Una Daly: unatdaly@oeconsortium.org Questions?

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