OER and Accessibility
with Open BCcampus & CU PhET
Simulations
Amanda Coolidge, Open BCcampus
Emily B. Moore, PhET Simulat...
Collaborate Window Overview
Audio & Video
Participants
Chat
Tech Support available at:
1-760-744-1150 ext. 1537, 1554
Agenda
• Introductions
• CCCOER Overview
• Intersection of OER & Accessibility
• Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit
• PhE...
Welcome
Please introduce yourself in the chat window
Amanda Coolidge
Open Education Manager
BCcampus
Moderator: Una Daly
D...
• Expand access to high-
quality open materials
• Support faculty choice
and development
• Improve student success
Communi...
250+ Colleges in 21 States
& Provinces
Why Accessibility?
• 11% U.S. post-secondary students
report disability.
– More attend two-year colleges
– Higher poverty,...
OER & Accessibility
Intersection
• Access/Affordability
• Open license allows modification
• Find and create accessible OE...
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Amanda Coolidge
Open Education Manager
Amanda Coolidge
Senior Manager, Open Education
CCCOER Webinar
Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creati...
Connect the expertise, programs, and resources of all BC post-secondary
institutions under a collaborative service deliver...
Open Education & Professional Learning
OER Global Logo by Jonathas Mello is licensed under a CC-BY 30 License
Support & pr...
BC Open Textbook Project
40 free & open textbooks for highest
enrolled 1st & 2nd year post-secondary
subjects in BC
2013 –...
Why are we doing this project?
To increase access to higher education by reducing student costs
To give faculty more contr...
The Project
Don’t reinvent it by Andrea Hernandez released under CC-BY-NC-SA and based on Wheel by Pauline Mak released
un...
Where do they come from?
Faculty Reviews
291/365 by thebarrowboy used under a CC-BY
Reviews > Adaptations
My Adventures Adapting a Chemistry Textbook291/365 by thebarrowboy used under a CC-BY
Publish Many
Write Once
Choices for students (and for adapters)
Old Leather books, by Wyoming_Jackrabbit used under a CC-BY-NC-SA
Day 1 access to resources
“My textbook is…
…back-ordered
…in the mail
…out of stock
…the wrong edition
…on hold until my student loan arrives
…not n...
Our Numbers
117 Open Textbooks
284 Adoptions
18 Institutions
9,067 Students
$906,700-$1,185,537.15
Amanda Coolidge. acoolidge@bccampus.ca
Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ...
User Testing
Timelines
• Mid-November 2014 – contacted Disability Service departments to
recruit students
• December 19, 2014 –sent tes...
Testing open textbooks
One chapter from each of the following:
• English Literature
• Introduction to Psychology
• Introdu...
Feedback
For each chapter:
• Content questions
• Feedback on specific items – navigation, layout, text flow, tables,
font,...
Students said…
“Please continue to consult with the students who are using these
books.”
“Thank you again – it is really a...
Accessibility
Toolkit
Our Process
Summary of steps (December 2014 – February 2015)
1. Focus group (7 students, 5 open textbooks, 1 chapter from ...
The Toolkit!
Introducing… the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit
http://opentextbc.ca/accessibilitytoolkit/
“Key Concepts”
1. Universal Design for Learning
2. User Personas
“Best Practices”
1. Organizing Content
2. Images
3. Table...
Accessibility Toolkit (continued)
“Best Practices” Chapters:
• Introduction & context for each content type
“File types in...
Next Steps
Includes:
• Incorporating Toolkit into development process for all new Open
Textbook creators
• Corrections to ...
Thank you!
@BCOpenText @BCcampus
@acoolidge @tararobertson @SueDoner
http://opentextbc.ca/accessibilitytoolkit
PhET Interactive Simulations
Emily B. Moore
Director of Research & Accessibility
PhET Interactive Simulations
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 42
Making Interactive
Simulations Accessible
Emily B. Moore | University of Colorado Bou...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 43
Overview
Introduction to PhET Interactive Simulations
PhET’s Approach to Accessibilit...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 44
PhET Interactive Simulations Project
130+ Sims
75+ Million
Runs/Yr
Free, Flexible,
Ex...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 45
Intuitive
interface
Implicitly
scaffold
inquiry
Allow difficult or
impossible actions...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 46
MISSION
TO ADVANCE STEM
EDUCATION
WORLDWIDE THROUGH
FREE INTERACTIVE
SIMULATIONS
TRAN...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 47
PhET’s Approach to Accessibility –
Inclusive Design
Accessibility incorporated into d...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 48
Inclusively Designed PhET Sims
Accessibility Features
Keyboard Navigation
Auditory De...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 49
Current Priorities
Keyboard Navigation
Full access to sim elements from keyboard
Bene...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 50
Demo - Forces and Motion: Basics
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 51
Challenges
Technical
Design
Research
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 52
HTML & Accessibility
HTML5
Modern markup language
Runs in-browser
Cross-platform (PC,...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 53
HTML & Accessibility
Assistive technology recognizes
this internal structure
Allows n...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 54
Interactive HTML Sims & Accessibility
Interactive HTML learning
resources are not str...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 55
PhET’s Approach - Parallel Structure
More info at: http://phet.colorado.edu/en/about/...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 56
Benefits to this Approach
Supports standards-based implementation
(when standards exi...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 57
Design Challenges
Designing consistent, intuitive accessibility features
Designing la...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 58
Challenges = Opportunities
Breaking new ground in accessible interactive learning
res...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 59
Overview
Introduction to PhET Interactive Simulations
PhET’s Approach to Accessibilit...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 60
Tips for Inclusive PhET Sim Use
General
Ask students to tell you if they are having t...
PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 61
Thank you!
Resources
PhET Interactive Simulations - http://phet.colorado.edu
PhET & A...
Oct 19 @
10am PST, 1:00 pm EST
Adaptive Learning Webinar
Norman Bier, Simon Initiative Director
Dustin Silva, Math Faculty...
Thank you for coming!
Contact Info:
Una Daly: unatdaly@oeconsortium.org
Amanda Coolidge acoolidge@bccampus.ca
Emily B Moor...
OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus and CU PhET Simulations
OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus and CU PhET Simulations
OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus and CU PhET Simulations
OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus and CU PhET Simulations
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OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus and CU PhET Simulations

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Please join the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) for aenabld car license free and open webinar on selecting and creating open educational resources that support all learners regardless of disabilities. The mission of the Open Education community is to expand access to education, which highlights the importance of ensuring that OER used in the classroom follow guidelines for accessibility as well as affordability.

Speakers will share their experiences in adapting open textbooks and interactive science simulations to meet the needs of diverse learners. Important standards including the international Web Content Access Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) from the Worldwide Web Consortium will be introduced and the role they play in developing accessible digital content.

Date: Wed, October 14, 
Time: 10 am PST, 1:00 pm EST


Featured Speakers:

Amanda Coolidge, Open Education Manager, Open BCcampus
Will describe the process of user testing open textbooks with post-secondary students who have print disabilities focusing on lessons learned in this process and how this data fed into the creation of a toolkit on accessibility for open textbook authors.
Emily Moore, Director of Research & Accessibility, PhET Interactive Simulations, University of Colorado Boulder
Will share ways that PhET SIMs teachers currently use to support diverse learners and give an update on the main accessibility efforts in the prototype and development phase. She will also demonstrate a few of the new accessibility features that teachers can look forward to in the future.

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  • ELLUMINATE/CCC Conference Opening Script
     
    [Start recording…] Welcome to the ________ Webinar for DAY, MONTH, YEAR [sponsored by].

    [If applicable] Today’s guests come to us from _______ in ____, ___. I will introduce them shortly, but first I want to go over a few details about this [Elluminate/CCC Confer] session for those who are new to [Elluminate/CCC Confer].

    Details

    At the upper left of your screen, you should see the Participants window, which lists the participants in this session. You can use the icons underneath this window to:
    Raise your hand if you have a question or comment and you wish to speak
    There are also happy and sad faces and an applaud icon
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    If you are using a microphone and have been recognized to speak,

    Click the button with the microphone on it and begin speaking. Remember to click the button again when you finish speaking so that someone else can have a turn.
    You can control your mic and volume levels with the sliders.
    And if you are having trouble with your headset or microphone, you can access the Audio Setup Wizard from the Tools menu on the top toolbar. From Tools, select Audio, and then Audio Setup Wizard, and follow the on-screen instructions.

    [CCC Confer ONLY] If you are using the telephone to speak,

    Click on the phone handset below the microphone and audio volume sliders. The call-number and pin will then appear in a dialog box.
  • The Community College Consortium for OER is a community of practice dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of open educational resources to enhance teaching and learning. We were founded to support the community college mission of open access through creating awareness and development of openly licensed, low-cost education materials to make college more affordable and accessible for students. We provide regularly scheduled online and face-2-face workshops for faculty and staff who are engaged in OER projects.
  • Hi Everyone, name is Amanda Coolidge and I am the Senior Manager of Open Education at Bccampus.

    The presentation, Can I actually use it? Testing open textbooks for accessibility is based on a collaborative project that Bccampus did with CAPER BC and Sue Doner of Camosun College.
    Tara Robertson is from CAPER-BC, a small organization that provides alternate formats to 20 post secondary institutions across the province of BC. Basically their team makes custom audiobooks and ebooks for textbooks for students with print disabilities. Last year they served about 1200 students. As they have existing relationships with Disability Service Offices and work with students with print disabilities it made sense that Tara recruit and communicate with the students.

    ----

    Sue Doner is an instructional designer for online & blended learning programs at Camosun College in the province of British Columbia. She has been working on building faculty understanding & capacity re: Universal Design for many years. Before this Toolkit project, Sue had produced a number of how-to resources at Camosun (“Accessibility Checkpoints Guides”) that were designed to educate faculty about the why-of-the-what they needed to do while also not overwhelming them with information and technical
  • Before we begin on the evolution of the BC Open Textbook Project I will give you a bit of background on Bccampus. Bccampus supports the work of the BC post secondary system in the areas of teaching, learning and educational technology. We are funded through the government of BC’s Ministry of Advanced Education. There are three primary areas that we focus on at Bccampus, open education and professional learning, collaborative programs and shared services, and student services and data exchange.
  • The area that I work in and the one that houses the BC Open Textbook project is the area of Open Education and Professional Learning, where it is our mandate to support and promote the development and use of Open Educational Resources and support the development of effective teaching and learning practices. You may recognize some of these names on the slide as you may have taken part in SCOPE, ETUG, or perhaps searched for and downloaded Open educational resources from SOLR.
  • The BC Open Textbook Project is the Ministry’s response to a number of the issues of student debt and restricted access that Rajiv pointed out. The Open Textbook project was first announced in 2012 at the Open Education Conference in Vancouver, by the then minister of advanced education, John Yap. He announced that the BC Provincial Government would provide the funding of $1 million in the creation of 40 open textbooks for the highest enrolled post-secondary subject areas in BC. In 2013 the government announced that another $1 million would be provided to develop 20 open textbooks for skills and training, in alignment with the BC Jobs Plan.
  • There are three main reasons that propel our drive for open education and in particular in the open textbook project. We want to increase access to higher education by reducing students, we want to give faculty more control over their instructional resources, and we want to improve learning outcomes for students.
  • At the start of the project in 2012, we did an inventory of the highest enrolled subject areas in BC post-secondary. We knew that many established open projects had already created and adapted open educational resources and open textbooks in some of these areas, so rather than start from scratch by creating our own textbooks we decided to adopt open textbooks that already existed and had a proven track record of high quality and widely adopted materials.
  • Some of our adoptions came from OpenStax College out of Rice Univeristy, OER Commons, the Open Textbook Library out of Minnesota and Merlot repositories.
  • We then posted these open textbooks in our collection and began to solicit reviews from BC faculty. Faculty were to review a book’s comprehensiveness, content accuracy, relevance, clarity, consistency and modularity. Each review was then posted with the open textbook in our collection. As you can see the review is posted with the reviewer’s name and which institution he or she is affiliated with and has a CC ND license attributed to each review.
  • From the reviews we then put out a call for proposals for faculty to adapt the textbook based on the reviews. We wanted to ensure that whatever was missing or lacking from a textbook in our collection that it was then adapted to meet the needs of our BC Faculty. In some cases the reviews indicated that the books were too US centric, or that some of the chapters were not relevant for the BC context. Being able to adapt a textbook to meet specific learning outcomes, that is the power of working in the Open. The faculty had the opportunity to change the textbook. Here is one example of an adaptation- Professor Jessie Key at VIU adapted the Introductory Chemistry book based on the reviews submitted.
  • All of the BC open textbooks are created using Pressbooks, which is based on a Wordpress platform. It allows the books to be written in one format and then published in a variety of outputs. EPUB, PDF, MOBI, XML, etc.
  • The benefit of multiple formats is that it means that students can choose the platform that they want to use. It also means that when faculty adapt the textbook they have a number of format options available to make those edits.
  • Another benefit has been the access to resources on Day 1.
  • Too often we have heard from students that the textbook is the wrong edition, that it is on hold until their student loan arrives, or the book is out of stock. It makes you wonder how often do our students start the term without the resources they need?
  • So that brings me to where we are today, at the beginning of October 2015. Since the project started in 2012 we know have 104 textbooks in our collection, 282 known adoptions from BC faculty, 18 BC institutions participating, and over 9, 000 students who have been affected by open textbooks.

    We currently have a savings of between $904,900 -$1.1 million

  • To find our collection of open textbooks you can go to open.bccampus.ca and should you have any follow up questions after today I would be happy for you to contact me. Thank you.
  • Our goal was to get about 15 students to test the open textbooks. In the end 7 students completed the written feedback and 5 of those students also attended an in person focus group. I thought that a $150 honorarium would be enough of an incentive but it was difficult to recruit people.

    Our goal was to find student volunteers who were engaged and who would give us good concrete feedback. As our department works with the disability service offices I thought it would be a good approach to get recommendations from staff of keen students. Disability service offices are busy at the end of each semester with exam accommodations, so perhaps that’s one reason why we didn’t get many names.
  • Picked a good cross section of content and known accessibility issues.

    English Literature – poetry, footnotes
    Introduction to Psychology—tables, images
    Introduction to Sociology—quiz, one long chapter--no headings
    British Columbia in a Global Context—charts, maps, and an embedded Google Map
    Introductory Chemistry—images, formulae/equations
  • 5 different subject areas that didn’t necessarily line up with what our student testers were studying.

    We gave the following instructions: “We’re asking you to read one chapter from 5 different textbooks in the way that you normally would, using the software and hardware that you would normally use. We realize that some of these topics might be outside the area that you’re studying.
    For each chapter there are a few questions about the content that are intended to test the readability of the content not your intelligence, so don’t feel bad if you have a tough time answering the questions. For each chapter please fill out the feedback form and note any areas where the content was hard to understand. It is likely you will get some content that is not accessible or not very accessible.”

    For each chapter we thought up some content related questions, like “What is the definition of Weber’s law, or what is the population of Sweden?” that we hoped would make the testing a bit more realistic and give some focus to reading various textbook chapters.

    When we were putting together the feedback form we took a look at a bunch of UX surveys. We had difficulty describing the concept of “layout”. We forgot to include keyboard accessibility as a section.
  • As facilitators we were a little nervous about doing the focus group. For all of us this was our first experience with user testing, focus groups and working with a group of students who were low vision or blind. BCcampus has a strong track record of organizing engaging events and they ordered tasty food, booked a room in a venue that has good transit access. I also ran our plans by a blind colleague who runs an Adaptive Technology organization to ensure we hadn’t missed key accessibility points.

    5 students attended the focus group. While they all have visual impairments they all use different assistive technology including: VoiceOver on an iPad, VoiceOver on a Mac, JAWS on Windows laptop, ZoomText on a Windows laptop and Kurzweil on a Windows laptop. They were from 3 different universities and have different majors including: general arts, English, Computer Science, Business and an Occupational Therapist who is doing a PhD in interdisciplinary studies. 65% of the CAPER-BC students have learning disabilities and last year over 50% of the materials we produced were in trades, so I was a little disappointed that I was unable to recruit students with learning disabilities or who are in the trades.

    We learned a lot from the students at the focus group. They were really well prepared and had a lot to say. We were really lucky to work with such an engaged group of students.

    Before the focus group Amanda and Sue went through the written feedback and pulled out things that people identified as being problems or where one student said it was fine and another student said it wasn’t accessible to them.

    Amanda did a great job of facilitating the day. She did a great job of not making assumptions about what students were experiencing or why it was problematic, instead asking them for more detail or to show us what wasn’t working. I work with alternate formats every day and would’ve made some assumptions about why something wasn’t working. By being naïve and curious Amanda was able to flesh out with the students what wasn’t working.

    The students highlighted some against accessibility issues we hadn’t anticipated.

    For example, in the chapter from the English book has some embedded YouTube videos that JAWS didn’t read.

    We didn’t anticipate that when poetry was enlarged using ZoomText that it could be annoying to have to scroll horizontally to read the end of the line. This formatting issue clearly got in the way of being able to feel the flow of the poem. Reading the students feedback didn’t really make sense, but having her show us what the problem was did. The in person focus groups were really valuable.

    We didn’t anticipate that the section quiz questions and answers in the Sociology chapter were going to be so confusing. There were about 10 multiple choice questions and the answers were at the very end of the chapter, after the endnotes. No one really knew they were there as they lacked a heading. Also, a “vertical line” or “vertical” was used as a delimiter between each question and when read by VoiceOver or JAWS. So it sounded like “1. A  |  2. B  |  3. C  |  4. D” which is super confusing.
  • 4. Toolkit Plan. Post-feedback event:, Amanda, Tara & I met to brainstorm the plan; discuss the audience, the scope, & approach to take.
    “Who” is the audience?: Toolkit to be designed with Faculty/content creators, instructional designers, ed. techs, in mind who “may not know what they don’t know” about making materials accessible. Typical faculty writer is not always familiar with the pro-active strategies of Universal Design as they apply to accessibility, and would more likely be accustomed to referring students who identify selves as having a disability to their institution’s Disability Resource Centre…
    “Why” do they need the Toolkit?: Several motivators here – the root of all things...
    We – i.e. all practitioners in the e-learning industry – need to collectively reflect & practice an increased understanding of the differences between “accommodation” and “accessibility” – and by that I mean, accessibility as a specialized lens of Universal Design for Learning. For those who might not be familiar with the distinction between accommodation and accessibility:
    Accommodating for students with a disability involves some form of individualized adaptation of a learning environment – creating an alternative option after course is underway for a student to access or complete a component of their learning experience. To be eligible for an accommodation at most institutions, students have to formally identify themselves as having a disability with institution’s Disability Resource Centre. Accommodations should be reserved to overcome specific barriers for individuals, determined on a case by case basis, and only for those barriers that cannot be addressed through instructional planning. .
    Following the student-centred principles of Universal Design for Learning, course materials are pro-actively designed to support different types of learning styles and learner preferences. For example, visual aids can be an effective way of explaining a concept to some learners, while providing a text version of the same concept may be the learning preference of others. Planning at the design/pre-delivery stage for multiple methods of accessing course concepts is one of the fundamentals of UDL.
    Similarly, Accessibility of digital materials reflects thoughtful, proactive attention to the design of learning materials so that they can be accessed from Day 1 by learners with a disability. I.e. the stuff that should not require an accommodation. So - making course materials Accessible is just a specialized focus of the UDL framework.
    The best part about working to build our collective literacy around accessibility of digital course materials (in this case, Open Textbooks) is that accessible design is better for all learners – not just those who formally register as having a disability. The student-centred focus of accessible design also benefits those students who aren’t registered with a Disability Resource Centre. E.g who:
    are aging into a disability (e.g. aging eyes may need to see text in larger font, or need option to view in high contrast); or (e.g.)
    Are international students for whom English is a 2nd language (e.g. may benefit from having all video materials close-captioned and opportunity to improve English-comprehension.)

    “What” should be included?: We didn’t want to overwhelm with information; our goal was to provide users with manageable steps towards success; ease the panic of “I don’t know what I don’t know when you tell me that my material has to be accessible”… Therefore – goal was to create digestible, user-friendly, plain-language, “just enough information” guides - “Best practices” sections for different types of textbook content (with added benefit of being transferable to typical online course materials, because broader application and uptake can only help to increase capacity!!)
    “How” to bring the value of this work (i.e. making your textbook accessible) to life: I.e. this work has real benefits for REAL people. Therefore:
    (As noted earlier) - Emphasis placed on principles of Universal Design for Learning – pro-active remediation of materials so they can be accessed by anyone from DAY ONE (without having to register for or request an accommodation);
    Humanizing element / elevate the student-centredness of this practice – project team adopted & adapted user personas from “A Web for Everyone…”, incorporated additional personas based on CAPER user data + our students. Through the integration of these personas, help to bring a recognizable person into the mix for each of the Best Practices sections, and move content creators/developers/designers past the theory of accessibility to the real-life impacts of it.
    --
    “Where”: Toolkit built & delivered in Pressbooks site: added benefit of building/developing Toolkit content using same tool that the open textbook developers used = modeling of the practices need to adopt and reflecting the “what do I need to do” part in the same environment.
  • We’re excited to present… The Accessibility Toolkit. [First iteration; a work-in-progress that we’ll continue to build on as we learn more and/or respond to changes in industry standards, and different types of content enter into the Open Textbooks library.]
  • The Accessibility Toolkit consists of two macro-sections:

    “Key Concepts” – introduces developers to our underlying framework
    “Best Practices” – the practical application of our framework, against the common types of content currently found in the Open Textbook collection.

  • We created a common framework for the “Best Practices” chapters too: (E.g. TABLES)

    Introduction, “What is a ---?”, and “Before you begin” (Guiding principle for us: avoid making assumptions about the end-user’s technical knowledge; be as clear as possible).
    Establish clear context plus can’t assume everyone knows what an image is, etc. AND in some cases – pause to consider why you are including this. (Value added or bright & shiny…?)

    Who are you doing this for?
    “You need to do this, and here are the people you’re doing it for…”; note that not all of the people listed would be students who would register themselves as having a disability w/ their institution’s Disability Resource Centre.
    Includes bulleted list of typical type of user who benefits from this work PLUS 1-2 of our user personas to again bring the humanizing element home.

    What do you need to do?
    Practical applications of the “what you need to do” w/ examples to illustrate when possible;
    Included “new ground” discussion for many in the post-secondary education industry. E.g. Multi-media section & requiring transcripts even for 3rd-party videos. This isn’t always in line with copyright practices so pits accessibility; Typical accommodation limits (e.g. one-off productions that cannot be stored and re-used, etc.) aren’t in line with Universal Design & pro-active provision of alternate formats.
  • More to come, etc:
    (E.g.) More info for making Math & science equations accessible (!!!)
    More languages (e.g. have offers to translate into French and a braille version)

    “Community of Practice” –
    This is an area of practice that will benefit hugely from the sharing of resources/experiences/approaches between colleagues and institutions. It’s a new “literacy” skill for many of us, but we need to get to that place in our collective practice where we would no more overlook pro-active attention to accessibility requirements than we would putting on our seatbelt in the car. (Reference from CSUN).
    It would be wonderful to have a centralized community we could turn to, that was focused on this specialized application of UDL. (BCcampus = happy to support this, and we’re in early stages of planning this out; in the short-term, please contact Sue w/ expressions of interest: doners@camosun.ca)

    Current state – typical & growing issues in e-learning vs. accessibility:
    e-Textbooks vs. accessibility: we know that most textbook publishers haven’t come to the table re: accessibility of e-textbooks yet. Eg. Athabasca reported exponential increase of accommodation requests since they have begun to adopt e-texts from one publisher.
    Rapid growth of online teaching & learning in the trades = specific area of focus for UDL.


  • http://opentextbc.ca/accessibilitytoolkit/
  • Brief Introduction to me & PhET Project
  • Awards on this?
  • OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus and CU PhET Simulations

    1. 1. OER and Accessibility with Open BCcampus & CU PhET Simulations Amanda Coolidge, Open BCcampus Emily B. Moore, PhET Simulations, University of Colorado Oct 14, 2015, 10:00 am PST Unless otherwise indicated, this presentation is licensed CC-BY 4.0
    2. 2. Collaborate Window Overview Audio & Video Participants Chat Tech Support available at: 1-760-744-1150 ext. 1537, 1554
    3. 3. Agenda • Introductions • CCCOER Overview • Intersection of OER & Accessibility • Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit • PhET Interactive Simulations • Q & A
    4. 4. Welcome Please introduce yourself in the chat window Amanda Coolidge Open Education Manager BCcampus Moderator: Una Daly Director of Curriculum Design & College Outreach Open Education Consortium Emily B. Moore Director, Accessibility & Research PhET Interactive Simulations University of Colorado
    5. 5. • Expand access to high- quality open materials • Support faculty choice and development • Improve student success Community College Consortium for OER (CCCOER) http://oerconsortium.org Come In, We're Open gary simmons cc-by-nc-sa flickr
    6. 6. 250+ Colleges in 21 States & Provinces
    7. 7. Why Accessibility? • 11% U.S. post-secondary students report disability. – More attend two-year colleges – Higher poverty, lower educational and career attainment. • Legal framework – American Disability Act – Canadian Human Rights Act • Born digital – Guidelines for accessibility Image: Morgue File
    8. 8. OER & Accessibility Intersection • Access/Affordability • Open license allows modification • Find and create accessible OER Image: licensed by John Axtell CC-BY-NC-SA via Flickr
    9. 9. BCcampus Open Textbooks Amanda Coolidge Open Education Manager
    10. 10. Amanda Coolidge Senior Manager, Open Education CCCOER Webinar Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Feel free to use, modify or distribute any or all of this presentation with attribution “Can I actually use it?” Testing open textbooks for accessibility
    11. 11. Connect the expertise, programs, and resources of all BC post-secondary institutions under a collaborative service delivery framework 1 2 3 Open Education & Professional Learning Student Services & Data Exchange Collaborative Programs & Shared Services
    12. 12. Open Education & Professional Learning OER Global Logo by Jonathas Mello is licensed under a CC-BY 30 License Support & promote the development & use of Open Educational Resources Support the development of effective teaching & learning practices 1 Connect the expertise, programs, and resources of all BC post-secondary institutions under a collaborative service delivery framework
    13. 13. BC Open Textbook Project 40 free & open textbooks for highest enrolled 1st & 2nd year post-secondary subjects in BC 2013 – 20 for skills & training First province in Canada 2013 – AB & SASK MOU $1 million 2013 - $1 million Visual notes of John Yap announcement, Giulia Forsythe Used under CC-SA license
    14. 14. Why are we doing this project? To increase access to higher education by reducing student costs To give faculty more control over their instructional resources To improve learning outcomes for students Annie Lennox campaigns with Oxfam at the AIDS Conference by Oxfam used under CC-BY-NC-ND license
    15. 15. The Project Don’t reinvent it by Andrea Hernandez released under CC-BY-NC-SA and based on Wheel by Pauline Mak released under CC-BY license
    16. 16. Where do they come from?
    17. 17. Faculty Reviews 291/365 by thebarrowboy used under a CC-BY
    18. 18. Reviews > Adaptations My Adventures Adapting a Chemistry Textbook291/365 by thebarrowboy used under a CC-BY
    19. 19. Publish Many Write Once
    20. 20. Choices for students (and for adapters) Old Leather books, by Wyoming_Jackrabbit used under a CC-BY-NC-SA
    21. 21. Day 1 access to resources
    22. 22. “My textbook is… …back-ordered …in the mail …out of stock …the wrong edition …on hold until my student loan arrives …not needed until I decide I want this course” How often do students start the term without the resources they need?
    23. 23. Our Numbers 117 Open Textbooks 284 Adoptions 18 Institutions 9,067 Students $906,700-$1,185,537.15
    24. 24. Amanda Coolidge. acoolidge@bccampus.ca Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Feel free to use, modify or distribute any or all of this presentation with attribution http://open.bccampus.ca
    25. 25. User Testing
    26. 26. Timelines • Mid-November 2014 – contacted Disability Service departments to recruit students • December 19, 2014 –sent testing instructions to students • January 19, 2015—received feedback forms from students • January 27, 2015—in person focus group • February 27, 2015 –published Accessibility Toolkit
    27. 27. Testing open textbooks One chapter from each of the following: • English Literature • Introduction to Psychology • Introduction to Sociology • British Columbia in a Global Context • Introductory Chemistry
    28. 28. Feedback For each chapter: • Content questions • Feedback on specific items – navigation, layout, text flow, tables, font, images, links • Overall feedback
    29. 29. Students said… “Please continue to consult with the students who are using these books.” “Thank you again – it is really a privilege to be a part of this. You all did an excellent job – the facilitation, the bits and pieces of logistics, the questions and feedback – great job to all of you!”
    30. 30. Accessibility Toolkit
    31. 31. Our Process Summary of steps (December 2014 – February 2015) 1. Focus group (7 students, 5 open textbooks, 1 chapter from each) 2. Questionnaire (for each chapter) 3. Feedback event (chapter-by-chapter discussion with students) 4. Toolkit plan & framework: Who, Why*, What & How *Accessibility (& Universal Design) vs. Accommodation 5. Toolkit delivery: Where – in Pressbooks (same tool used to deliver open textbooks)
    32. 32. The Toolkit! Introducing… the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit http://opentextbc.ca/accessibilitytoolkit/
    33. 33. “Key Concepts” 1. Universal Design for Learning 2. User Personas “Best Practices” 1. Organizing Content 2. Images 3. Tables 4. Weblinks 5. Multimedia 6. Formulas 7. Font size 8. Colour Contrast Accessibility Toolkit
    34. 34. Accessibility Toolkit (continued) “Best Practices” Chapters: • Introduction & context for each content type “File types include..” and “Before you begin…” • Who are you doing this for? Persona example(s) + “this work supports students who…” • What do you need to do? Includes technical instructions, supporting examples (good & bad)
    35. 35. Next Steps Includes: • Incorporating Toolkit into development process for all new Open Textbook creators • Corrections to existing textbooks • User feedback and contributions • More chapters, new iterations – French Version! • TRADES!! • BC (and beyond!) “Community of Practice”… [contact doners@camosun.ca]
    36. 36. Thank you! @BCOpenText @BCcampus @acoolidge @tararobertson @SueDoner http://opentextbc.ca/accessibilitytoolkit
    37. 37. PhET Interactive Simulations Emily B. Moore Director of Research & Accessibility PhET Interactive Simulations
    38. 38. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 42 Making Interactive Simulations Accessible Emily B. Moore | University of Colorado Boulder
    39. 39. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 43 Overview Introduction to PhET Interactive Simulations PhET’s Approach to Accessibility Challenges in Making Sims Accessible Tips & Resources
    40. 40. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 44 PhET Interactive Simulations Project 130+ Sims 75+ Million Runs/Yr Free, Flexible, Exploratory Learning Tools Math & Science 77 Languages Design Research Energy Skate Park Gravity & Orbits Molecule Polarity
    41. 41. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 45 Intuitive interface Implicitly scaffold inquiry Allow difficult or impossible actions Multiple representations Real-time feedback Highly interactive Molecule Polarity
    42. 42. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 46 MISSION TO ADVANCE STEM EDUCATION WORLDWIDE THROUGH FREE INTERACTIVE SIMULATIONS TRANSFORM STEM LEARNING • Engage students in exploration and discovery • Develop robust conceptual understanding • Make STEM accessible, understandable, and enjoyable • Empower students to direct their learning FOR ALL STUDENTS • Intuitive, easy-to-use design • Available online – can download for offline • Flexible tool for teachers Tailor for their students and their goals
    43. 43. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 47 PhET’s Approach to Accessibility – Inclusive Design Accessibility incorporated into design and development process Accessible from the start (Goal) Accessibility features added as layers One-size-fits-one approach Can be turned on, off, or adjusted as needed Inclusively Designed PhET Sims Coming Spring 2016
    44. 44. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 48 Inclusively Designed PhET Sims Accessibility Features Keyboard Navigation Auditory Descriptions (for screen readers) Sonification Text-to-speech Pinch-to-zoom Color Contrast Control Resources Professional Development Guides, Videos Inclusive Classroom Activities Research Effectiveness with diverse populations of students Classroom use with diverse student groups
    45. 45. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 49 Current Priorities Keyboard Navigation Full access to sim elements from keyboard Beneficial for students who are blind, low vision, or have mobility issues Auditory Description Descriptions of sim elements, interactions, and changes Beneficial for students who are blind, low vision, or who have some learning disabilities Inclusively Designed PhET Sims Coming Spring 2016
    46. 46. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 50 Demo - Forces and Motion: Basics
    47. 47. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 51 Challenges Technical Design Research
    48. 48. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 52 HTML & Accessibility HTML5 Modern markup language Runs in-browser Cross-platform (PC, Mac, Tablet, Phone) PhET HTML5 Sims 2013 – PhET began developing in HTML5 29 sims available in HTML5
    49. 49. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 53 HTML & Accessibility Assistive technology recognizes this internal structure Allows navigation (and “skimming”) through content
    50. 50. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 54 Interactive HTML Sims & Accessibility Interactive HTML learning resources are not structured like web pages! Assistive devices cannot recognize any internal structure Assistive devices cannot provide access to content PhET Sim – No Accessibility ?
    51. 51. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 55 PhET’s Approach - Parallel Structure More info at: http://phet.colorado.edu/en/about/accessibility
    52. 52. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 56 Benefits to this Approach Supports standards-based implementation (when standards exist) Allows us to keep accessibility structure consolidated Eas(ier) updates and maintenance
    53. 53. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 57 Design Challenges Designing consistent, intuitive accessibility features Designing layers to “play well together” KayLynne Yarbrough (Flickr.com)
    54. 54. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 58 Challenges = Opportunities Breaking new ground in accessible interactive learning resources Freely sharing our code, process, & designs with the educational technology community
    55. 55. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 59 Overview Introduction to PhET Interactive Simulations PhET’s Approach to Accessibility Challenges in Making Sims Accessible Tips & Resources
    56. 56. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 60 Tips for Inclusive PhET Sim Use General Ask students to tell you if they are having trouble with any resource Indicate multiple ways to do this Lecture Describe pedagogically relevant actions and outcomes Be specific – avoid “here/there” language Think about your descriptions linearly, or as nested lists Online Screencasts can be provided as additional resources Student Groups Consider having students work with the sim in groups Prompt students to be explicit about their needs and to support each other
    57. 57. PhET Interactive Simulations PAGE 61 Thank you! Resources PhET Interactive Simulations - http://phet.colorado.edu PhET & Accessibility - http://phet.colorado.edu/en/about/accessibility Using PhET Sims - http://phet.colorado.edu/en/teaching-resources Funding The National Science Foundation The Hewlett Foundation University of Colorado Boulder Get Involved! Contact me to join our pool of user testers Follow our progress -> PhETSims @PhETSims phet.colorado.edu/blog phet.colorado.edu/en/subscribe
    58. 58. Oct 19 @ 10am PST, 1:00 pm EST Adaptive Learning Webinar Norman Bier, Simon Initiative Director Dustin Silva, Math Faculty, College of Canyons Oct 19 Webinar
    59. 59. Thank you for coming! Contact Info: Una Daly: unatdaly@oeconsortium.org Amanda Coolidge acoolidge@bccampus.ca Emily B Moore emily.moore@colorado.edu Questions?

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