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Emerging digital technology

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  1. 1. Introduction  Emerging technologies have the potential to transform learning in school classroom.  tablet computing  game-based learning  personal learning environments  natural user interfaces
  2. 2. Rationale  What these educators do not realize is that the very nature of student interaction with their world has changed drastically and permanently.  The information shift is as drastic as the move from handwritten texts to books from the printing press (Rankin, 2010).  the role of the teacher is no longer to disseminate facts and data to students because students cannot get that information easily anywhere else
  3. 3. Rationale  The average middle school student has direct access to this information on a daily basis and interacts with others around the world using interactive video games, social media, and mobile technology  Technologies that students use daily at home can become the tools that educators use to guide students in constructing knowledge in the 21st century and beyond.
  4. 4. Emerging Technologies: The Next Five Years  The New Media Consortium, or NMC, is a professional organization of educators dedicated to the study and application of technology in the classroom  The NMC’s annual Horizon Project describes in detail six emerging technologies and their probable impact over the next five years in several learning environments.
  5. 5. Mobile Apps  so has their potential to be resources in the classroom.  portable computing devices that usually contain WI-FI, Bluetooth technology, and GPS capabilities.  These computing devices can use apps for various functions.  Mobile devices like cell phones are always capable of connecting to the Internet using 3G or 4G wireless networks.  Mobile apps can be used both inside and outside of the classroom making them easy conduits for communication between students and teachers as well as facilitating collaborative learning with peers.
  6. 6. Mobile Apps  Because most students already own a cell phone or other mobile device, some educators are suggesting a program for instruction where students bring their own devices for use at school, called BYOD programs.  Some of the obstacles to a BYOD  ome students not being able to afford the necessary devices, and devices as possible distractions when not in use for instruction (Nielsen, 2011).
  7. 7. Tablet Computing  Are mobile computing devices. However, tablets have larger screens with sharper displays for using more powerful and educationally specific apps.  more portable option for school based one-to-one programs.  Tablets can also connect to the Internet to expand instruction.  In addition, tablets can be used as digital reading devices.  Tablets provide a much more interactive experience than a traditional textbook (Watters, 2012).
  8. 8. Tablet Computing
  9. 9. Game-Based Learning  Torres (2011) posited that video games are so important to students because they offer a sense of  relevance and context  are active  provide social interaction  offer emotional engagement.  Game-based learning can facilitate such instruction in a format that highly motivates students to learn.  Game-based learning can be approached in many ways.
  10. 10. Game-Based Learning
  11. 11. Personal Learning Environments (PLE)  Are a digital method of individualizing instruction  Each PLE is unique to each student  PLE’s can be in the form of wiki pages, personal blogs, e- portfolios of work, or websites that teachers or students can create themselves.  PLE’s can also promote collaboration when they are shared with others  PLE’s require a device to connect students to their constructed environment, which can be a computer, tablet, or mobile device.
  12. 12. Personal Learning Environments (PLE)  Are a digital method of individualizing instruction  Each PLE is unique to each student  PLE’s can be in the form of wiki pages, personal blogs, e- portfolios of work, or websites that teachers or students can create themselves.  PLE’s can also promote collaboration when they are shared with others  PLE’s require a device to connect students to their constructed environment, which can be a computer, tablet, or mobile device.
  13. 13. Natural User Interfaces  Natural user interfaces provide a teaching tool that engages all the senses and promotes active learning in the classroom, meeting the instructional needs of all types of learners (Center for Digital Education, 2012).  Natural user interfaces change the way that students interact with technology devices.  The traditional keyboard and mouse are replaced by sensors that detect voice commands, gestures, and touches by the user to manipulate the given technology device.
  14. 14. Natural User Interfaces  Natural user interfaces allow users to engage in virtual activities with movements similar to what they would use in the real world, manipulating content intuitively” (Johnson et al., 2012, p. 32)  Examples of natural user interfaces are the touch screen and surfaces, used on smartphones, tablets, and interactive whiteboards; gesture-based sensors, used with devices like the Xbox Kinect and Wii; and voice activated technology, used with the iPhone’s Siri virtual assistant and Nuance’s Dragon speech recognition software.
  15. 15. Natural User Interfaces
  16. 16. Applications Across the Curriculum  It is not the technological tool that is important, but the instructional approach  Technologies in the classroom are tools to engage students and are no substitute for quality teachers or instructional approaches.  Some of these emerging technologies are appropriate for any content area. Example,  any teacher can use a wiki to create a PLE for their class or for specific assignments.  Students can then post work to the wiki while collaborating with the instructor and peers  Additionally, an instructor can use iTunes U to gather materials all in one digital location and distribute them to students.
  17. 17. Applications Across the Curriculum  Another goal for many schools across the curriculum is to become paperless.  Cloud computing also allows students to continue working at home with an Internet connection without lost papers or forgotten work.  Digital textbooks also help schools become paperless  Although some applications of these technologies can be for almost any teacher, some benefits of these technologies are content specific.
  18. 18. Language Arts  Most universally applicable is e-books. E-book readers, like the Kindle or the iBooks mobile app for iPod, iPhone, and iPad, allow literary texts to become interactive.  Literature also comes alive with mobile apps.  motivating reading and writing experience is facilitated by game-based learning platforms emphasizing literacy, including a writing component and critical problem solving in collaboration with peers.
  19. 19. Science  science students can benefit from science based personal learning environments.  Scitable is a free science library and personal learning tool focusing on genetics and cell biology.  The interactive textbooks can provide students with the means of manipulating data into charts, graphs, or other visuals.
  20. 20. Mathematics  Integrating technology into mathematics instruction can facilitate not only an understanding of the procedures of the math they are learning but also how to apply and synthesize it in the world around them. Mobile devices can help students visualize content.  A math teacher from Texas uses the Xbox Kinect in his classroom.
  21. 21. Arts and Physical Education  mobile apps allow art students to view masterworks of art from museums around the world, such as the free apps from the Van Gogh museum and the Louvre.  Music students can create their own digital music using apps like GarageBand for iPad.
  22. 22. Advantage  1. Improved Student Performance  2. Increased Student Productivity  3. Better Attendance Rates  4. Complete Resource Portability  5. Connect With Students More Easily
  23. 23. Disadvantages  The students would lose focus  that not all students and schools have access to technologies that can really work for this method.  Students from lower income areas and lower income families may not have access to the computers and internet technologies that the flipped classroom requires.  Students who do not have personal home computers or access to the internet would be forced to use public computers at a library or at the school.  students would be spending all of their "homework time" plugged-in in front of a computer screen.

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