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Inside the UX Studio - Lifetime Achievement Award for Nigel Bevan, PhD

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This was the presentation that accompanied the salute to Nigel Bevan as UXPA International awarded him the Lifetime Achievement Award posthumously. The award was given during the 2018 UXPA International Conference in Puerto Rico.

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Inside the UX Studio - Lifetime Achievement Award for Nigel Bevan, PhD

  1. 1. INSIDE THE UX STUDIO UXPA Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient Nigel Bevan, PhD Hosted by UXPA International, Moderated by Chris Hass 1
  2. 2. NIGEL BEVAN, PHD Rest in Peace, Memory, & Legacy 2
  3. 3. LIFE & UNEXPECTED DEATH ➤ Nigel Bevan was born on 18th July 1946 in Essex in the United Kingdom but lived in London for the major part of his life. He died suddenly and unexpectedly in Sarawak, Malaysia on 26th March 2018. He leaves behind a wife, Anne, two adult children, Nikki and Dave, three grandchildren, and an industry’s worth of friends colleagues, students and hikers who miss him. ➤ His accident and unexpected death took us all by surprise, and as word of his untimely death moved through the internet and international media channels, there was a rapid outpouring of surprise and sorrow. In the days that followed news outlets wrote about Nigel’s death with emergent details that at times inadvertently overdramatized the accident itself. ➤ His family wanted his friends and colleague to know that the original stories of Nigel’s accident and subsequent death gave a more dramatic impression than what actually occurred. In their words he was hiking with three companions and a native guide when he “banged his head and slid a little down from the path, before being brought back up by the group he was hiking with. ➤ Above all, it made a big difference to us to know that he was never alone (he was with his group until the rescue team arrived), and also that it was not a long drawn-out death as we had feared, as it seems that the change from his condition seeming quite stable to his death happened quite suddenly.” 3
  4. 4. THOUGHT LEADERSHIP ISO and Beyond 4
  5. 5. CURRICULUM VITAE ➤ Nigel was the very definition of a man of letters. He held degrees in physics and psychology, and a PhD in man-machine interaction. ➤ He was Professional Usability Consultant through his company Professional Usability Services, a National Expert for UXQB, Research Manager at Serco Usability Services, Head of Usability at the National Physical Laboratory, and a Research Associate at the University of York. ➤ He participated in several international standards groups and contributed to the development of ISO 13407 and ISO 9126. He was responsible for developing the new Common Industry Format standard for usability requirements. Nigel has given tutorials on usability, web evaluation and user centered design around the globe. ➤ Nigel was a member of the US National Academies Committee on Human-System Design Support. 5
  6. 6. CURRICULUM VITAE ➤ Nigel was technical co-ordinator of the EU MUSiC (Measurement of Usability in Context) project that produced methods for usability measurement. These methods have since been widely applied commercially. ➤ He was manager of the INUSE and RESPECT projects that set up a network of Usability Support Centers around Europe, the TRUMP project that incorporated user centered design into the development processes of two large organizations, the PRUE project that trialled use of the Common Industry Format for usability test reports, and the UsabilityNet project that has established a website of usability resources. ➤ Nigel has an international reputation for his work on usability and user centered design. He has numerous publications, and has given tutorials on usability, web evaluation and user centered design at international conferences including the Usability Professionals’ Association, CHI, Interact, HCI International and software quality and software engineering conferences. ➤ He was a Board member of the User Experience Professionals’ Association (then called UPA) and a council member of the UK UPA. 6
  7. 7. JUREK KIRAKOWSKI “I know I speak for all when I say that Nigel's death comes as a sudden shock. He was one of those people that you thought would live forever, tracing long voyages through the skies in first class compartments to critical scientific meetings, visiting friends, or going on hiking expeditions - often, all three. A constant wonder and a delight.
 
 I have known Nigel since our early days (circa 1985) in CEC-funded projects when he was a reviewer on the ESPRIT - HUFIT project Nr. 385. We struck up an immediate friendship because we both shared aims and also the curiosity to argue between ourselves, sometimes extremely vigorously, as to how best these aims could be achieved. It was in the ESPRIT MUSiC Project, of which he was the director from 1990 - 1994 that I was able to develop the SUMI questionnaire as part of the MUSiC Usability Evaluation toolkit. MUSiC had the ambitious aim of turning usability from a broad aspiration into a quantifiable objective, which under Nigel's leadership, we succeeded in doing. We demonstrated some of our achievement at the first CUE workshop in the UPA conference at Washington, 1998.
 
 Nigel was not only a great intellectual opponent, he was also a very close friend. 7
  8. 8. IN ADDITION ➤ From the mid-1980s Nigel was involved with the development of international standards as a national expert for the UK in both Systems and software engineering, and Ergonomics becoming the founding convenor of ISO TC159/SC4/WG11 Ease of operation of everyday products in 2010. ➤ He was a member of the TC13 (on Human-Machine Interaction) committee of the International Federation of Information Processing societies (IFIP) and was involved in the creation of the first of the ongoing INTERACT conferences in 1984. In the 1990s the Usability Forum with which he was involved made a significant difference in industrial engagement for the practice of usability. 8
  9. 9. SARAH BLOOMER “Nigel and I met at CHI in the mid-90's and became conference friends. Little did I know he’d play an important role in my professional life.   I lived in Melbourne, Australia then (today I'm in Boston). Nigel worked at NPL (National Physical Laboratory, the UK's National Measurement Institute) where he staked out his role as an important contributor to ISO and usability standards.  He explained why NPL included usability - because we needed a standard way to measure usability. Those were the years when we called ourselves "usability engineers,” and we were seeking ways to demonstrate our value. Measurement was Nigel’s approach.  Like others, I had many conversations where we did not always agree and those conversations with Nigel were part of my education. Nigel taught me a thing or two about standards and measurements. He had a unique and major impact on my professional life. Whilst we lost touch over the past 15 years, I'll never forget him.” 9
  10. 10. ISO STANDARDS Decades of Advocacy 10
  11. 11. ENVISIONING ISO HCI AND ERGONOMICS STANDARDS Nigel was an important contributor to national and international standards through his involvement with the International Standards Organization (ISO) from early in his career until his untimely death. He specialized in the standardization process for the developing fields of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Usability and contributed to the 1999 ISO 13407 standard, “Human-centered design processes for interactive systems.” (This has now been superseded by ISO 9241-210:2010, “Ergonomics of human-system interaction -- Part 210: Human-centered design for interactive systems” to which he also contributed.) 11
  12. 12. CONTRIBUTIONS TO ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7/WG6 STANDARDS ➤ ISO/IEC 9126-1:2001 Software engineering - Product quality - Part 1: Quality model ➤ ISO/IEC 9126-4:2004 Software engineering - Product quality - Part 4: Quality in use metrics ➤ ISO/IEC 14598-1:1999 Information technology - Software product evaluation - Part 1: General overview ➤ ISO/IEC 25010:2011 Systems and software engineering - Systems and software Quality Requirements and Evaluation (SQuaRE) - System and software quality models ➤ ISO/IEC 25022:2016 Systems and software engineering - Systems and software quality requirements and evaluation (SQuaRE) - Measurement of quality in use. 12
  13. 13. ROLF MOLICH, UXPA LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENT “I have known Nigel since at least 1998 where he participated in the first CUE-study. After his retirement, I have been in regular contact with him at ISO-meetings. He was a highly esteemed advisor to our European certification effort. I have always known Nigel as a kind, helpful, enthusiastic and very knowledgeable person in our field. ” 13
  14. 14. LEADER OF THE FOLLOWING ERGONOMICS PROJECTS ➤ ISO 9241-11:1998 Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals (VDTs) - Guidance on usability; ➤ ISO 20282-1:2006 Ease of operation of everyday products - Design requirements for context of use and user characteristics; ➤ ISO/TS 20282-2:2013 Usability of consumer products and products for public use — Summative test method; ➤ ISO/IEC 25063:2014 Systems and software engineering - Systems and software product Quality Requirements and Evaluation (SQuaRE) - Common industry Format for Usability: Context of use description; ➤ ISO 9241-11:2018 Ergonomics of human-system interaction — Usability: Definitions and concepts; ➤ ISO 9241-230 Ergonomics of human system interaction — Human-centered design and evaluation methods (in progress). 14
  15. 15. CAT HERZON “I met Nigel at the 2007 CHI Conference, after he had presented on ISO 9241-11. Having learned about ISO standards from working with engineers, I was so excited that someone finally understood that HCI needed an ISO code because much of what we do is engineering related. I conveyed this to him after he spoke, and found him to be very approachable, open, and warm, which was lovely to experience. He was such a pioneer to have accomplished an ISO code for the field of usability.” 15
  16. 16. CONTRIBUTIONS TO ERGONOMICS EDITORIAL TEAMS ➤ IEC 62508:2010 Guidance on Human Aspects of Dependability; ➤ ISO 9241-220 Ergonomics of human–system interaction – Processes for enabling, executing and assessing human- centered design within organizations (in progress). “In addition to assigned responsibilities Nigel Bevan was diligent, thorough and perceptive in commenting on standards on behalf of both the UK and UXPA. His tireless work in this area without doubt improved very many standards for both ergonomics and software.” 16
  17. 17. COMMON INDUSTRY FORMAT A Personal Aside 17
  18. 18. CONTRIBUTIONS TO ERGONOMICS EDITORIAL TEAMS He was responsible for developing the new Common Industry Format (CIF) standard for usability requirements. His standards work extended to the “Quality in use” and CIFs standards from JTC1. 18
  19. 19. PERSONAL ASIDE Early in my career I was hired by the American Institutes for Research, where I had the privilege of working alongside Joe Dumas, Michael Wiklund, and Beth Loring. AIR’s standard practice for Usability test reporting was the CIF. CIF was complicated, tedious, and amazingly thorough. I was advised as I used it for government and commercial projects, that learning how to “do it right” in long form (CIF) would serve me well in the future. And it did. Despite its rigors, turning a one week study into a juggernaut 100 page single-spaced MS Word document, it gave me a framework and respect for proper scientific documentation processes. And later, when I joined other consultancies, I boggled at how they used PowerPoint, sometimes fewer than 40 slides, to communicate findings. How amateurish! Imagine my surprise to learn from Nigel of his involvement in CIF. This was my reaction; 19
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  21. 21. PERSONAL ASIDE Quickly followed by this: 21
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  23. 23. PERSONAL ASIDE All that work was YOUR fault?! 23
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  25. 25. PERSONAL ASIDE Then the realization of how I had benefitted from being able to “do it right” when it counted- on government projects, medical device evaluations, and more. Perhaps all that hard work had a lasting and profound. . . payoff? 25
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  27. 27. PERSONAL ASIDE And finally: Respect, Nigel. For leading the way. 27
  28. 28. UXPA UXPA Board Member, Friend 28
  29. 29. UPA / UXPA LEADERSHIP ➤ Nigel served on the UXPA Advisory Board as a Director from 2002 - 2007 ➤ As the UXPA Director of Professional Development he led the Usability Body of Knowledge initiative. ➤ He served as Regional Director for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa in 2012. ➤ Since 2014, Nigel has served as UXPA's liaison to the International Standards Organization (ISO) 29
  30. 30. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Nigel served on the UXPA Advisory Board as a Director from 2002 - 2007 As the UXPA Director of Professional Development he led the Usability Body of Knowledge initiative. He served as Regional Director for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa in 2012. Since 2014, Nigel has served as UXPA's liaison to the International Standards Organization (ISO) I had the pleasure of working on the UXPA Advisory Board with Nigel. I’m not certain what those who aren’t on the board imagine being on the board is like, but if I had to guess, it would look something like this… 30
  31. 31. 31
  32. 32. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) When in actuality. . . 32
  33. 33. 33
  34. 34. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) . . . it looks like this. A LOT of this. Nigel’s expertise and expectations for collaboration, professionalism, and occasional complete bafflement at how his colleagues saw the world, made him a tireless and passionate advocate for the betterment of the organization, and helped safeguard its long- term intellectual legacy. 34
  35. 35. CAROL SMITH, UXPA BOARD MEMBER “I was honored to have had deep, spirited debates with Nigel on the UXPA board and while we worked on the Usability Body of Knowledge I cherished his wonderful hiking stories and his passion for our industry. His tireless efforts and energy were inspiring. I will greatly miss his spirit and catching up with his escapades.” 35
  36. 36. JAMES R. (JIM) LEWIS, PHD, CHFP “I met Nigel at the IBM lab in Boca Raton -- I think it was in the late 1980s -- when he was consulting with the people in my Human Factors department who were involved in international standards (e.g., Pete Kennedy). Over the years we would run into each other from time to time at conferences, and for a long time one of the highlights of attending the HCII conferences was getting together with him for dinner after tutorials were done for the day. His work has been so influential, and it has been good to see how he as a person has had such a positive influence on others. I will miss him.”  36
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  38. 38. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) A photo of Nigel and his cohorts after one of Rolf Molich’s CUE studies. From the look on Rolf’s face, at the end of the CUE study. Nigel also was instrumental in starting World Usability Day. In her own words, here’s former UXPA President Elizabeth Rosenzweig to describe the origins of World Usability Day: 38
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  40. 40. TRANSCRIPT OF VIDEO Video location: https://youtu.be/42jpUdtLaUs I remember first meeting Nigel in 1998 at a CIF (Common Industry Format) workshop organized by NIST to add some rigor to our user centered design work. Nigel talked about the ISO standards he was working on and it made a huge impression on me, think that what I had been working on the last 13 years would actually become a legitimate field of study was so inspiring. I went on to serve on the Usability Professionals’ Association (UPA) Board with Nigel for several years, culminating in our joint appointment in 2004 as the Co-Directors for Outreach. Many years, after the conference or before/after a Board meeting he would organize a hike, sharing his love of adventure with the rest of us. As a life long hiker, I naturally was drawn to the hikes where many of us would solidify our professional relationships over the years. 40
  41. 41. TRANSCRIPT OF VIDEO (2) I remember one hike in Arizona, the group was on a trail in the desert and I noticed many cacti and stickers. One in particular, the jumping choli also known as the hanging chain cholla, which is basically a cholla cactus . And they were so sticky, I made sure to stay away from them. Nigel on the other hand was never deterred from a goal and he wanted to explore off trail a bit. The group agreed to meet him in a nearby location where we were going to have some water and snacks. Nigel came hiking to us and sounded like he was chuckling. When get got nearer we saw jumping cholla all over his legs below his knees. He was not complaining but simply asked if anyone had a tweezers or pliers. I had my swiss army knife and we got to work pulling the jumping cholla out. Nigel could be heard saying…”careful, ouch..”and then “lovely” as soon as we pulled one out. Nigel was in Boston for a professional meeting and was staying at my house, as he did occasionally in those years. The time was Fall of 2004, which happened to be a big one for Boston (my hometown). The Boston Red Sox were playing the New York Yankees in the playoffs- the American Championship League Series, the run off to the World Series. Red Sox had a long-standing rivalry with the Yankees, going back over 80 years. I was raised a die-hard Red Sox fan and had been paying attention to the series. Nigel and I had planned on going to dinner one night during a very critical and contentious game. We were eating in a restaurant that was attached to a bar that was airing the game, and from which screams and cheers kept erupting. Nigel asked me what was going on, should we be concerned there was so much commotion. I explained that it was an important baseball game, perhaps the game of the century for age old rivals. 41
  42. 42. TRANSCRIPT OF VIDEO (3) Nigel completely understood, although confessed he knew more about cricket then he did baseball. We compared the merits of baseball and cricket, each agreeing we liked our own version of that similar sport. A few times I had to excuse myself to run and see what was going on. A turning point had occurred in the game and it looked like the tide had possibly turned for the Red Sox. Although Nigel and I were talking about how we could change the world with better designed products, I was distracted by the game. After the third time I jumped up and ran into the bar after I heard the crowd cheering- I clearly remember Nigel asking me with that twinkle in his eye “is this a big match?” referring to the baseball game that was distracting me. 42
  43. 43. TRANSCRIPT OF VIDEO (4) I laughed, just at the way he asked, as if, of course, he knew how big it was. Despite my jumping up every now and then and running into the bar, Nigel and I brainstormed about the ways we could help the world by making products and services easier to use, and how that could help people become the best that they were. It was an inspiring conversation, fueled partially by the great wine he always knew how to pick, but also, because Nigel asked me great questions, posing them as explanation of obstacles we would face. I was not afraid of challenges and was fueled, no doubt on my end, by the exciting baseball series I was following.Nigel stayed a few more days at my house and during the time the Red Sox went on to beat the Yankees and win a chance to play at the World Series. I was so inspired by my hometown team finally beating the Yankees and getting to the world series, and my conversation with Nigel that I felt invincible, like we could aim high and have a shot at our dreams. 43
  44. 44. TRANSCRIPT OF VIDEO (5) So, I suggested we put together a plan to start an annual day, modelled after Earth Day, in which we could raise awareness and motivate companies to create products that were more usable. That plan help launch World Usability Day(WUD)- which Nigel helped start. WUD has now been run 13 times, on the second Thursday in November all around the world. We have reached over 40 countries, with hundreds of events and as such, helped launch a field that is strong today- with many different titles-User Centered Design. User Experience, Interaction Design and more. I don’t think World Usability Day would have been possible without Nigel’s enthusiasm, support, insight and positive outlook. I last saw Nigel almost a year ago at the SIGCHI 2017 conference in Denver. It was great, as always to see him. He had invited me to a hike but I had to leave to attend my middle son’s graduation from university. Nigel and I caught up and at one point he remarked that he was amazed World Usability Day was still around and going strong. I am glad that I remember to tell him that he was part of the reason it was so successful. 44
  45. 45. TRANSCRIPT OF VIDEO (6) I am glad to report that his legacy will be remembered as this summer during the User Experience Professionals’ Association Annula Conference where they will award Nigel the lifetime achievement award, the first time that they will do that posthumously. I am only sorry this did not happen while he was alive but am proud that it is happening now. I can imagine that if he did get this award while he was alive, he would have received with the modesty and good humor he did all his great work. I think these qualities are what helped him be so successful in moving our field forward and bringing rigor and thus legitimacy. Thank you Nigel and I will miss you. 45
  46. 46. TOM MCCANN “Nigel and I had the occasional intense Skype discussion when involved in the early days of the Body of Knowledge project but no matter the level of intensity he was always relaxed and convivial. One of nature’s gentlemen. RIP Nigel.” DANIELLE COOLEY “He was an enthusiastic partner in much of the preliminary work for the UXPA conference in London in 2014. I will miss his humor and levity, and the field will be worse off without his intellectual contributions and his energy.” 46
  47. 47. NARRATIVE, SPOKEN ALOUD If you were ever at a conference with Nigel, this was a common way to see him: 47
  48. 48. TOM TULLIS, UXPA LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENT “Nigel obviously touched many lives-- perhaps more than he realized. I've known him through conferences (UXPA and CHI) for many years, plus the CUE exercises . . . He was one of those people who spoke with quiet authority. At conferences he would ask questions of speakers because he was genuinely interested not because he was trying to show to everyone how smart he was. And, of course, he was a very smart guy. But more importantly he was a very nice guy. I'll miss him. I've assembled some of the photos I have of Nigel from UXPA conferences over the past several years. One of the things that you'll see in those photos is that Nigel didn't just attend a conference, he engaged with people at the conference.” 48
  49. 49. BORDERLESS CONTRIBUTIONS Helping Bring UX Practice to China and Japan 49
  50. 50. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Nigel is credited with broadening the reach of Usability standards and practices to Asia, specifically China and Japan. 50
  51. 51. ZHENGJIE LIU “Nigel is my good mentor and friend for more than 20 years. It is him who led me into the field of usability around 1996-1997 and helped found Sino- European Usability Center in 2000 as the first usability engineering center in China. I still remember vividly that a sunny afternoon in autumn 1997, I received a big plastic envelope mailed from him at a meeting that contained a bunch of printed materials on usability and user-centered design. We met each other for the very first time at INTERACT’1999 in Edinburgh, where I attended a tutorial offered by him on usability and he invited me for dinner and introduced me to try Scottish haggis. Soon after that he visited us in Dalian and Beijing later the same year. He helped us involved, as a non-EU partner, in UsabilityNet (http://www.usabilitynet.org/ about.htm) - an EU Fifth Framework Program project coordinated by him, which led Sino-European Usability Center founded in 2000. This made a great contribution to the start and dissemination of user experience practice in China.” 51
  52. 52. Vampire? WORLD TRAVELER, HIKER 52
  53. 53. DAVID BEVAN, SON “Dad was always an adventurer. Apparently at age two he took advantage of a few minutes unattended to find his way through a gap in the garden fence - our granny was horrified to see his little bobble hat left caught on some wire! - and he made his way down to the marshes behind the house. And it seems like he lived like that from then on, always curious, never scared, living life to the full. At primary school he managed to escape a school trip and, intrigued by a giant 'KEEP OUT' sign, ended up on a military base. As a young teen he cycled on his own around Germany - something he still talked proudly of as an older man - and later made his way solo through Eastern Europe. I like the the story of the time he ran out of cash and, having read in a guide book that travelers could make good money by selling blood to local hospitals, he went around asking in the local language "where can I sell blood?" It was only after a number of startled looks and a careful check of his little dictionary that he realized he had been asking to *buy* it!” 53
  54. 54. DAVID BEVAN, SON “I think one of the reasons he was such a happy traveler was that he was profoundly non-judgmental. He had many strong opinions and preferences of course, but he somehow seemed to never fall into the trap of blaming or judging - a wonderful and rare quality, especially in a dad! That made him a fantastic listener - someone we could talk to about anything, but it also meant he could be very direct: he saw no reason why expressing a view would be problematic because he didn't have those hang-ups himself. When he was younger this led to the occasional moment of agonizing social faux pas, but it happened less and less as he got older. He was profoundly rational and clear-thinking, but also fascinated by people and the endless ways in which we are anything but rational.” 54
  55. 55. DAVID BEVAN, SON “Even though dad wasn't sentimental, he always found ways to express love and affection. Every trip would lead to some sort of gift or memento - often bizarre foods in indecipherable packaging that we would sit around and try, with trepidation but also joy. When our mum became ill, he looked after her with utter dedication, but also didn't fall into the trap of giving up on his own life and interests. So he would spend hours researching the most ergonomically efficient (is that a tautology?) products for mum to use, from non-slip trays to automatic lighting, and would take mum out to see family - which she still loves to do - even though the logistics of the journeys could often be highly challenging. ” 55
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  57. 57. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Speaking now for myself, Nigel’s travel habits took me a little while to hone in on. He was singularly quiet and task focused and in an Advisory Board context we would first talk shop. But as I got to know him better, he would show up looking a little extra tired to a meeting and I’d say “up too late?” thinking he was a little worse the wear as we all get on these junkets- up too late, perhaps a little too much to drink the night before. Instead, as if it was the most normal thing to offer, he’d shrug and say “noisy coyotes in the campsite.” Invited to elaborate, revealing that while I was tiring myself out swapping stories with colleagues at the end of a long, patient day he had driven several hours out into the wilderness, hiked a mountain, camped all night, and decamped in time to get back to the boardroom in the morning. Alone or with friends, Nigel was an inveterate hiker, and a seasoned world traveler. He casually let on one time that he was a multiple million-mile traveller on British Airways. As a traveller myself, I asked him for some tips. About an hour later, this was my brain: 57
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  59. 59. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) I’d go away, bewildered, marveling at advice like: “Always try to go through Bulgaria, you might need to hike across the border to the next airport, and pick up your flight there. It takes some hours, maybe an overnight, but you get double the miles for that leg. Maybe more if it’s raining or a Thursday.” Weeks later I’d think “I’m misremembering, it can’t be that complicated.” And we’d repeat this conversation again. And weeks later, again. To his credit, it was never clear if Nigel remembered that we had discussed this before, or was merely being polite, but I never managed to get it, and he never evidenced frustration at my confusion. But I think as far as British Airways is concerned, they probably need to retire a plane in his honor or something. 59
  60. 60. TIMO JOKELA, PHD “As we know, Nigel was a keen hiker.  Nigel organized his meeting trips so that he had one or two days for hiking.  I hiked with him in Crete, California and Finland, my home country. When he visited Helsinki (Finland) in 2013 he proposed hiking near Helsinki after the meeting. I proposed the national park ’Nuuksio,’ thinking, of course, that it would be new experience for him. As we headed for the hike, he, for my full surprise, took an old map of the park from his back bag. He had been hiking there by himself years back.  Unfortunately I do not have picture from that hike. But I attach a picture from California, before the CHI conference 2007: Nigel together with David Siegel and my son Erno Jokela in the Big Sur area.” 60
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  62. 62. GINNY REDISH, UXPA LAA RECIPIENT “The first time I heard Nigel’s stories of his travel adventures was sitting next to him at dinner at a conference sponsored by Hermes Software in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in about 1998. Wow! The places he went to and the challenging treks he undertook were amazing. I was impressed (and a bit jealous knowing I would never take on challenges like Nigel did).” 62
  63. 63. LYLE KANTROVICH, UPA BOARD 2006-2008 “There's a great and funny story Nigel told me once. Unfortunately I don't remember the specifics well enough to get all the funny parts right, but I'll give you the gist of it in the hopes that someone else might've heard it more recently and can help flesh out more of the details. Anyone that knew Nigel much at all knew he loved to travel. He'd take flights with multiple layovers in order to get more airline miles...so he could travel more in the future. He of course loved hiking and mountain climbing, and would seek out destinations near conferences and universities to enjoy those activities. So on one trip to a another country (I believe in Asia), he decided to go on a hike. He was teaching a course or workshop at a university and arrived a day early and took an afternoon hike. He took a train (or monorail?) up the mountain and went on his hike which was to be a couple of hours. (Long story short...) He took a wrong turn, missed a sign or something and ended up taking the wrong trail on the mountain...a much longer trail. About halfway around the mountain he realized his mistake and knew he'd miss the last train. He arrived back at the train depot after the last train. It was getting dark and colder with the sun going down at that altitude. He realized he was in a bad spot, and (if I recall correctly), hiked down the railway for some distance until it got dark. He ended up sleeping in a little train depot hut during a very frigid night, then at dawn (or some early hour) hiking further down the mountain via the railway tracks. He ended up arriving quite late to teach his course, wearing the clothes he slept in on the side of the mountain, without benefit of a shower or shave. I guess he was quite a sight...and he had a great and funny story to tell that morning and for years afterwards. For me, this story perfectly exemplifies Nigel's passions and personality. Many people would think "never again will I do something like that" - for Nigel it was just another great, humorous adventure he could talk about while traveling the world evangelizing the great cause of usability.” 63
  64. 64. DAVID SIEGEL, PHD “Lyle got that story mostly right.  The venue was Tokyo and the hike was in the Japanese Alps.  He reached the start of the hike by cable car from the little town that he had reached by train from Tokyo.  At the upper station of the cable car, there was a terrace with a snack bar and maybe other little shops.  According to his map, the hike was a loop.   He began to wonder if he had deviated from the route.  He couldn’t decide if he should just keep going ahead—maybe he was already close to the end point if he was on the right route—or retrace his steps, which was more sure but possibly much longer.  He eventually chose the latter. By the time he got back to the cable car station, all was shut down for the night.  He slept on the terrace, and, at dawn, crashed his way down the mountain through the brush under the cable car route. He reached the little town in time to catch a fast train to Tokyo, and went straight to the conference. He rushed in at the last moment.  He said the host was trying to stall.  He must have had twigs in his beard. I hiked with him in the Sierras, the Smokies, the North Cascades, the Escalante Canyon area of Utah . . . and in the mountains over Big Sur.   Because of the Japan story, and MANY others like it, Susan was always worried about these hikes.  On our first, in the Sierras, we were on our way back down from an 11 mile hike up to the 11,000’ level, and just as I was telling him how, clearly, Susan’s worries had turned out to be unfounded, the trail came to an abrupt end at the lip of a vertical cliff several hundred feet high.  We had missed a fork about a quarter mile back.  We just laughed about it. If you are adventurous, stuff like this actually happens all the time, and you just deal with it, ideally with a laugh.  The reason he had so many funny stories was not because he was ill fated, but because he was so adventurous.” 64
  65. 65. LYLE KANTROVICH, UPA BOARD 2006-2008 “Thank you, thank you David! I knew you'd be likely to have the full story - and get all the little details right too...they make it a much better story.  I'm grateful just to have it documented so I can read it over in the future and share it with my kids. It's the richness of adventures (i.e. challenges, mishaps, mistakes, goofs, travails and accomplishments) that make them memorable, rewarding and fun. I hope to have even just a fraction of the adventures Nigel experienced.” 65
  66. 66. 66
  67. 67. 67
  68. 68. JUREK KIRAKOWSKI “…If anyone richly deserves that award, it's Nigel. He'd have been so embarrassed to receive it in his thoroughly English way but I know he'd have also reckoned it was his due - because men of that stature always know their worth. I can't tell you how much I miss him still!!! Nigel’s passion was hill walking, mine is diving, which I am doing off the coast of Crete every day this summer. Of course we are all experienced hands at our game and all of us are immortal! But Nigel's death gave me pause for thought and a check with my buddies that we were still going by the book.” 68
  69. 69. CARL MYHILL “He was always the one to try a new thing on a menu and a new wine, rating the latter. I knew him through his work and through [LIST THAT SHALL NOT BE NAMED] of course. We didn't always agree on things like standards for practitioners but clearly he made an impressive contribution to usability and this community.
 
 I'm glad we finally met properly in 2006. At UPA 2006 in Colorado the Practitioner session was full, so I organized a practitioner hike instead. Nigel was one of the people that signed up and we had a very enjoyable and sociable hike. Nigel had arranged to spend a few days in Colorado after the conference but didn't have specific plans so he joined Trent and me for some white water rafting on the Colorado River, if I recall the river correctly. I remember the briefing for the rafting trip being terrifying. If we fell out of the boat we were told to not stand up on any account because the rocks could move around and trap your foot. I was pretty pleased when Nigel immediately volunteered to sit in the front!
 
 Nigel also joined Trent and me and a couple of my old friends from the area, Sue and Carla, to go on a hike up Quandary Peak (it's an odd peak with nothing but loose rock all over it - perhaps that's why it has that name). We had an awesome day. Despite not knowing us very well we had a very relaxed day out. Nigel was an easy going outdoor enthusiast and a pleasure to spend time with.
 
 I'm very sorry Nigel's left us too soon. I hope it's some comfort that he died doing what he loved. I'm glad I got to know him in person a bit whilst hiking.” 69
  70. 70. 70
  71. 71. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Carl continues: I’m very sorry Nigel's left us too soon. I hope it's some comfort that he died doing what he loved. I'm glad I got to know him in person a bit whilst hiking.” 71
  72. 72. 72
  73. 73. 73
  74. 74. ELIZABETH BUIE “My first substantial in-person experience of him occurred at CHI '96, when for some reason we found ourselves walking around central Vancouver at night, partly I think just to walk and partly to choose a restaurant. I had been warned that at group dinners he had a habit of ordering the most expensive wine on the menu and assuming that everyone would share the cost, but when it was just the two of us that didn't happen: we had a decent wine that wasn't outrageously expensive. :-) I was delighted to have Nigel as one of the authors of the chapter on standards for the book that Dianne Murray and I edited on usability in government systems.
 
 I will feel sad for a good while, I think.” 74
  75. 75. 75
  76. 76. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) A map displayed at Nigel’s funeral showing all the places he visited in his life. 76
  77. 77. DEBATE Staunch defender of positions 77
  78. 78. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) To work with Nigel was to, at times to find yourselves on the opposite sides of a position. As UX-ers we are a brilliant, passionate, and at times socially awkward and dramatically… unique group of people. With the utmost respect, I submit the following remembrance of Nigel as perhaps the most “UXPA” thing you’ll ever encounter. 78
  79. 79. TIMO JOKELA, PHD “As a professional, he was a great contributor, but also a kind of ’stubborn’ person. One of the Nigel’s most important contributions in the field is the definition of usability, as stated in ISO 9241-11. It is a committee result, but my understanding is that Nigel was a key contributor (I was member of the ISO committee later but not when the definition was made).   I discussed the contents of the definition many times with Nigel, because I found the definition very good (although it has some minor inconsistencies, too). However, it became evident that my interpretation - e.g. the concept of ’user’s goal’ - was different what Nigel originally had intended. So, my conclusion was the the definition is better than Nigel originally intended. We discussed the matter many times, in good spirit. He kind of agreed with me. But, in the end, it always became evident that he never gave up his original thoughts.” 79
  80. 80. “The first adjective that comes to my mind when I think of Nigel is “irrepressible.” In discussions I found him always engaged — both intrigued and intriguing — whatever the topic.” ELIZABETH BUIE 80
  81. 81. GINNY REDISH, UXPA LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENT “How horrible that he is gone. He and I did not always agree on our approaches to UX or to standards, but I greatly appreciated Nigel’s interest and passion for his work. We will miss him in the UX community. ” 81
  82. 82. QUIRKY 82
  83. 83. JEN MCGINN “Nigel was a character - sometimes delightful, sometimes frustrating - I had a funny relationship with Nigel. Even though we worked together on projects, I'm not sure he actually knew who I was. I'd say hi to him at UXPA international conferences, and he'd kind of jump - like I'd sneaked up on him. He'd quickly look at my badge to see my name, and I'd try to refer to whatever we'd worked on last. Then we'd chat about that or another topic of UX interest, maybe have a meal together, and the next time I'd see him, the cycle would repeat. 
 Regardless of whether Nigel knew who I was, I knew who he was. I am grateful that I had the opportunity to work with him in those capacities, and am so saddened by this sudden loss. but reading this over, I get a pang in my stomach and tears in my eyes. He is missed.” 83
  84. 84. ANNA WICHANSKY “Nigel and I would often see each other at HCII meetings. You had to be careful going out to dinner with Nigel, he really liked to eat! It was fairly typical for me to invite panel members out to dinner the night before, just to prepare and know what each other was thinking ahead of time. I was amazed to see Nigel go through an appetizer, wine, dinner, wine, dessert, and after dinner drink. He was a small, wiry guy, but HCII definitely brought out the European side of him. I will truly miss him; he was my go-to for all things ISO in UX. Rest in peace,Nigel, and I'll be thinking of you on my next hike.” 84
  85. 85. 85
  86. 86. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) I showed this picture of Nigel and Aaron Marcus earlier. And it’s everything you would expect of Nigel in the moment. Poised, professional, even in the face of absurdity. What I want to show now is the moment just after this picture was taken. Nigel was always up for any kind of escapade but. . . 86
  87. 87. 87
  88. 88. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) As Aaron walked away, Nigel’s look said “Well, I don’t get the hat thing, but ok.” “Perplexed” was another facet of Nigel. He was always willing to engage, but he didn’t always get it. (To be fair I’m not sure anyone “gets” this hat either.) This perplexity and curiosity combined was simply, very Nigel. A few years ago, faced with an unexpected window of free time during the UXPA conference in Las Vegas, a bunch of us got it in our heads to go do something we had never done before. After much discussion, we decided to check out a gun range. As we were heading out, Nigel happened by and got caught up in our wake. Which led to this: 88
  89. 89. 89
  90. 90. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) It was a pleasure to go on escapades with Nigel, and to learn from his willingness to engage, to be deliberately playful. Look at that smile! In response to my request for photos for this presentation, many many of the photos had common themes: Nigel, with colleagues, somewhere exotic. Workshirt, boots, and a smile. 90
  91. 91. 91
  92. 92. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Reflecting on his father’s career, his son had the following to share: 92
  93. 93. DAVID BEVAN, SON “He was quietly proud of his work - I never heard him show off about it; in fact, I can't imagine him showing off about anything. I think he had nothing to prove, which made him a really calm presence. When I picture dad, he is either there at his laptop with a glass of excellent red wine, or he is walking just ahead of me, quickly but never in a rush, steadily pacing on. I think that's how he lived in general - always moving, always seeking more of life, covering thousands of miles (literally millions in fact, according to British Airways!) but enjoying the journey all the while. That's how we was when times were good but also when times were tough, and it was and still is a profound inspiration.  He was a great dad and an amazing man.” 93
  94. 94. 94
  95. 95. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Nigel and his wife, son, and grandchildren. Future hikers and thought leaders, no doubt. 95
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  97. 97. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) As final thoughts, permit me to share from my heart. It was a pleasure to work with Nigel, and to go on escapades with him, and I’m honored to have been able to enjoy his company and to learn from the examples he set. Earlier this week, I found myself in conversation with a friend about Nigel and we each allowed that prior to the conference we had both looked into hiking a nearby mountain here in Nigel’s honor. But we had each realized that the distance between here and the nearest hike wasn’t very compatible with attending the conference. And there it was. If he were here, Nigel would find a way to hike the mountains around Puerto Rico before, during, or after the conference. He may or may not have lured some UX-ers with him, but he would have made it happen. And that’s Nigel. It’s a lesson I learned from him, but am still working to live up to. You don’t need to be brash, or lazy, or regretful. If you love it, find a way to make it happen. If you are determined to make “usability” a lasting part of the professional world, then you hike. And hike. And hike. One foot in front of the other, one meeting after another, until you make it happen. You may arrive covered in nettles, but there you are. When you leave this conference, hopefully your mental, professional, and social horizons will be broader. As you leave this room, take a moment to just look at the ocean. Nigel’s quiet, steadfast, quirky, amazing life, shows us that there are horizons beyond horizons, contributions you can make, right now, today, through perseverance, intellectual rigor, and by not forgetting that what you do can be in service of what and who you love. Especially when it’s not easy. I find it heartening to remember that our field is evolving before us, with the people around us, on the trails blazed by those who left us along the way. Nigel led a singular life, and so do you. In his memory, let’s make the most of it. 97
  98. 98. INSIDE THE UX STUDIO UXPA Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient Nigel Bevan, PhD Hosted by UXPA International, Moderated by Chris Hass 98
  99. 99. NARRATIVE (SPOKEN DURING PRESENTATION) Thank you for helping us remember him today. Is there anyone here who would like to share a story or remembrance about Nigel? 99
  100. 100. PHOTOS & VIDEOS Family: https://www.forevermissed.com/nigelbevan/#about https://www.dropbox.com/sh/l96dmg0fn83k237/AABx98GZPl9ppKsUaxjdYjhda?dl=0 Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5Z53lW7x-0 
 Carl Myhill: https://www.flickr.com/photos/carlmyhill/albums/72157693297483211/with/ 26252058997/ Tom Tullis: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tomtullis/albums/72157667292612918 100
  101. 101. REMEMBRANCES FROM FRIENDS & COLLEAGUES (UNABRIDGED) 101
  102. 102. LYLE KANTROVICH, UPA BOARD 2006-2008 “I spent two years on the UPA board with Nigel and we had a number of dinners and conversations over the years. I appreciated him in many ways, and his contributions to the field really do warrant a lifetime achievement award.” 102
  103. 103. JUREK KIRAKOWSKI “I know I speak for all when I say that Nigel's death comes as a sudden shock. He was one of those people that you thought would live forever, tracing long voyages through the skies in first class compartments to critical scientific meetings, visiting friends, or going on hiking expeditions - often, all three. A constant wonder and a delight.
 
 I have known Nigel since our early days (circa 1985) in CEC-funded projects when he was a reviewer on the ESPRIT - HUFIT project Nr. 385. We struck up an immediate friendship because we both shared aims and also the curiosity to argue between ourselves, sometimes extremely vigorously, as to how best these aims could be achieved. It was in the ESPRIT MUSiC Project, of which he was the director from 1990 - 1994 that I was able to develop the SUMI questionnaire as part of the MUSiC Usability Evaluation toolkit. MUSiC had the ambitious aim of turning usability from a broad aspiration into a quantifiable objective, which under Nigel's leadership, we succeeded in doing. We demonstrated some of our achievement at the first CUE workshop, as Rolf Molich recalls, in the UPA conference at Washington, 1998.
 
 Nigel was not only a great intellectual opponent, he was also a very close friend. I'm glad Kent Norman and I were able to get his chapter into our Wiley Handbook of HCI (which came out earlier this year). Nigel's chapter stands as a testament to his great knowledge and whole-hearted advocacy of standards and intellectual rigor in the 
 computing industry.” 103
  104. 104. SARAH BLOOMER “Nigel and I met at CHI in the mid-90's and became conference friends. Little did I know he’d play an important role in my professional life.   I lived in Melbourne, Australia then (today I'm in Boston). Nigel worked at NPL (National Physical Laboratory, the UK's National Measurement Institute) where he staked out his role as an important contributor to ISO and usability standards.  He explained why NPL included usability - because we needed a standard way to measure usability. Those were the years when we called ourselves "usability engineers,” and we were seeking ways to demonstrate our value. Measurement was Nigel’s approach.  Like others, I had many conversations where we did not always agree and those conversations with Nigel were part of my education. NPL, where Nigel led the usability services, was purchased by Serco during the era when UK government agencies were turned over to private agencies. His group transformed from NPL Usability to Serco UX. It was Serco UX who bought my company, The Hiser Group. I remember visiting the Serco UX team in the UK, where Nigel continued to focus on his life's work of usability standards while Serco UX expanded into more mainstream user centered design work.  Serco UX only ceased business recently – still with its roots reaching 20 years back to Nigel's usability work at NPL. Nigel taught me a thing or two about standards and measurements. He had a unique and major impact on my professional life. Whilst we lost touch over the past 15 years, I'll never forget him.” 104
  105. 105. DAVID SIEGEL, PHD “Lyle got that story mostly right.  The venue was Tokyo and the hike was in the Japanese Alps.  He reached the start of the hike by cable car from the little town that he had reached by train from Tokyo.  At the upper station of the cable car, there was a terrace with a snack bar and maybe other little shops.  According to his map, the hike was a loop.   He began to wonder if he had deviated from the route.  He couldn’t decide if he should just keep going ahead—maybe he was already close to the end point if he was on the right route—or retrace his steps, which was more sure but possibly much longer.  He eventually chose the latter. By the time he got back to the cable car station, all was shut down for the night.  He slept on the terrace, and, at dawn, crashed his way down the mountain through the brush under the cable car route. He reached the little town in time to catch a fast train to Tokyo, and went straight to the conference. He rushed in at the last moment.  He said the host was trying to stall.  He must have had twigs in his beard. I hiked with him in the Sierras, the Smokies, the North Cascades, the Escalante Canyon area of Utah . . . and in the mountains over Big Sur.   Because of the Japan story, and MANY others like it, Susan was always worried about these hikes.  On our first, in the Sierras, we were on our way back down from an 11 mile hike up to the 11,000’ level, and just as I was telling him how, clearly, Susan’s worries had turned out to be unfounded, the trail came to an abrupt end at the lip of a vertical cliff several hundred feet high.  We had missed a fork about a quarter mile back.  We just laughed about it. If you are adventurous, stuff like this actually happens all the time, and you just deal with it, ideally with a laugh.  The reason he had so many funny stories was not because he was ill fated, but because he was so adventurous.” 105
  106. 106. LISA HALABI “I'm deeply saddened to hear about the unexpected departure of Nigel. I knew him from the time when we first established the UK chapter of the UPA circa 2001 and he was a friendly face ever since. I feel lucky to have known him. My condolences to his loved ones and those who feel his loss.” ELIZABETH BUIE “The first adjective that comes to my mind when I think of Nigel is “irrepressible.” In discussions I found him always engaged — both intrigued and intriguing — whatever the topic.” 106
  107. 107. ASH DONALDSON “Nigel was the type of man that never seemed to let anything stand in his way. I have fond memories of, on almost every ISO meeting, going on amazing adventures - from the urban wastelands of Russia to hiking from Thailand to Laos through dense jungle, removing leeches every few steps... He was a great thought leader in our field, with a passion for progressing and expanding quality. I haven’t met anyone like him. He will be sorely missed by myself and the community. Rest in peace, my friend. 107
  108. 108. INSIDE THE UX STUDIO NIGEL BEVAN UXPA 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient 108

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