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Dual Track Agile Or, How I learned to stop worrying and love the scrum

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In software there are two key types of work - discovery and delivery. However, that doesn't mean there are different people doing those jobs. If the whole team is responsible for product success, not just getting things built, then the whole team needs to understand and contribute to both kinds of work.

Dual track agile and the UXDX model both convey the approach of design and development working together.

Published in: Technology
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Dual Track Agile Or, How I learned to stop worrying and love the scrum

  1. 1. © 2019 Autodesk, Inc. Dual-Track Agile Or, how I learned to stop worrying and love the scrum John Schrag Director of Experience Design | @jvschrag
  2. 2. Autodesk Entertainment Creation Products We make high-end 3d modelling, animation, visual effects and rendering software for film, television, games, and architectural visualization Our customers make magic. Dina Salama John Schrag Director of Experience Design former - software developer - experience designer - agile coach Twitter: @jvschrag
  3. 3. Today’s talk How Agile ruined experience design First Revelation Why Agile + UX is an awesome combination Second Revelation Making it work for you Third Revelation A story in three Revelations
  4. 4. How Agile Ruined Experience Design
  5. 5. The 1990s – Life Before Agile My team at Alias  Waterfall development practice  All-unicorn UX team, led by Lynn Miller  Strong UX practice  Good relationship with developers, respected
  6. 6. 2001 Agile Arrives
  7. 7. 2002: Agile comes to Alias  Jim Highsmith hired to provide Agile Training  Adaptive Software Development  Scrum Meetings  Some aspects of Extreme Programming  UX practice was completely absent from process
  8. 8. 2002: Adjusting  Locus of control moved to team level  Developers were more engaged  Devs were driving the train! Dev teams were super happy!
  9. 9. 2002: Adjusting  Developers couldn’t wait for UX activities  We couldn’t provide feedback when the development team needed it  UX team became isolated and ineffective User Experience Team – not so happy Photo from The Darjeeling Limited
  10. 10. Failing Strategy  “I’m just going to keep doing my job the way I always have and telling the team what they need to do.”  “I’m just going to let them go ahead and fail. Then they’ll come to me begging and let me do my job.” Actual quotes from actual people
  11. 11. First Revelation: To serve Agile, design must become Agile.
  12. 12. Back to Principles  “Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.”  “The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.”  “Working software is the primary measure of progress”  “Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.”  “Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.”  Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. From the Agile Manifesto
  13. 13. Build Measure Learn
  14. 14. Agile Attributes Time-boxed Iterative Incremental Collaborative Conversational Just-in-time
  15. 15. Agile Attributes Time-box
  16. 16. Dual-Track Model, Explained
  17. 17. Design Track Development Track
  18. 18. Design Track Development Track
  19. 19. Design Track Development Track
  20. 20. Design Track Development Track
  21. 21. Design Track Development Track
  22. 22. Design Track Development Track
  23. 23. What everyone gets wrong about dual track  Devs and Designers on same team  Insight is shared – no “handoffs”  Devs are involved in design  Designers are involved in implementation Two TRACKS, not two TEAMS
  24. 24. Agile UX Practices
  25. 25. How to adapt anything for Agile Agile practices are:  Time-boxed  Iterative  Incremental  Collaborative  Conversational  Just-in-time
  26. 26. How to adapt anything for Agile Agile practices are:  Time-boxed  Iterative  Incremental  Collaborative  Conversational  Just-in-time UX practices must be adapted to have the same qualities, while maintaining their UX value.
  27. 27. How to adapt anything for Agile Old UX practice:  Create a prototype  Plan the test protocol  Find testers  Schedule tests  Run tests  Write a report detailing all found issues Usability Testing
  28. 28. How to adapt anything for Agile Old UX practice:  Create a prototype  Plan the test protocol  Find testers  Schedule tests  Run tests  Write a report detailing all found issues Usability Testing Agile Attributes  Time-boxed?  Iterative?  Incremental?  Collaborative?  Conversational?  Just-in-time?
  29. 29. How to adapt anything for Agile Agile UX practice:  Pre-schedule regular testing  Maintain a pool of testers  Test whatever is ready  Invite team to watch  Report key issues only  Involve developers in solving issues Usability Testing
  30. 30. How to adapt anything for Agile Agile UX practice:  Pre-schedule regular testing  Maintain a pool of testers  Test whatever is ready  Invite team to watch  Report key issues only  Involve developers in solving issues Usability Testing Agile Attributes  Time-boxed ✔  Iterative ✔  Incremental ✔  Collaborative ✔  Conversational ✔  Just-in-time ✔
  31. 31. How to adapt anything for Agile Old UX practice:  Visit many customers  Analyse all the data  Write a report  Create full set of artefacts (personas, use cases, journey maps, etc.)  Deliver to development User Research
  32. 32. How to adapt anything for Agile Agile UX practice:  Talk to users regularly  Focus on upcoming research needs  Mix methods (e.g. usability test + card sorting + interview)  Incrementally improve personas, maps, etc.  Explain insights to developers continuously via storytelling User Research Agile Attributes  Time-boxed ✔  Iterative ✔  Incremental ✔  Collaborative ✔  Conversational ✔  Just-in-time ✔
  33. 33. How to adapt anything for Agile Old UX practice:  Design the whole UI up from in great detail (BDUF)  Write down every detail in a long document  Review with stakeholders in a big sign-off meeting  Pass to developers to implement Writing a design spec
  34. 34. How to adapt anything for Agile Agile UX practice:  Replace BDUF with VDUF (Vague Design Up-Front)  Detailed design one sprint ahead only  Pictures and callouts – just a few pages  Talk through the design with developers  Visit with developers while they are building it Speccing a design Agile Attributes  Time-boxed ✔  Iterative ✔  Incremental ✔  Collaborative ✔  Conversational ✔  Just-in-time ✔
  35. 35. 2003 on: Making it work
  36. 36. We started to present/publish on the topic Miller, Lynn. “A Case Study of Customer Input for a Successful Product”. AGILE 2005 Schrag, John. “Using Formative Usability Testing as a Fast UX-design Tool”. UPA 2006 Sy, Desirée. “Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-Centered Design”. Journal of Usability Studies (JUS), May 2007
  37. 37. So did others Macomber, Gary and Rauch, Thyra. “Adopting Agility”. USE 2003. John Armitage. Are agile methods good for design? interactions, 11(1):14–23, 2004. Stefan Blomkvist. Towards a Model for Bridging Agile Development and User-Centered Design. Springer Netherlands, 2005. Stephanie Chamberlain, Helen Sharp, and Neil Maiden. Towards a framework for integrating agile development and user-centred design. In 7th International Conference on Extreme Programming and Agile Processes in Software Engineering, XP 2006, volume 4044 of LNCS, pages 143–153, Heidelberg, Germany, 2006. Springer Verlag Larry L. Constantine and Lucy A. D. Lockwood. Usage-centered software engineering: an agile approach to integrating users, user interfaces, and usability into software engineering practice. In ICSE ’03, pages 746– 747. IEEE Computer Society, 2003. P. Hodgetts. Experiences integrating sophisticated user experience design practices into agile processes. In Agile Conference, 2005, pages 235–242, 2005.
  38. 38. What did we call it again? Parallel Track Staggered Sprints Dual Track
  39. 39. We Agile
  40. 40. Our experience was not unique “I sometimes forget how miserable my first year in Agile development was...Eventually I adapted, and I’ve never been more content.” -Jeff Patton @jeffpatton
  41. 41. We miss Agile 2006
  42. 42. We go Agile (again)  I was asked to lead this effort (because I complained so much)  Made mistakes, learned a lot Autodesk M&E Division Agile Transformation
  43. 43. Second Revelation: There is always friction at boundary of what is Agile
  44. 44. Agile Boundary Friction FRICTION Development Design Content Localization Product Management Marketing
  45. 45. Agile Boundary Friction With Dual-Track FRICTION Development Design Content Localization Product Management Marketing
  46. 46. 2011: Lean Startup
  47. 47. 2011 Lean Startup Agile Product Management? Agile Attributes  Time-boxed ✔  Iterative ✔  Incremental ✔  Collaborative ✔  Conversational ✔  Just-in-time ✔
  48. 48. Agile Boundary Friction With Lean FRICTION Development Design Content Localization Product Management Marketing
  49. 49. Improvements Interaction Design Track Development Track Better track names
  50. 50. Improvements Interaction Design Track Development Track Better track names
  51. 51. Improvements Discovery Track Delivery Track Better track names - David Hussman
  52. 52. Improvements Marty Cagan
  53. 53. Three Tracks? Carol J. Smith, Thyra Rauch, Hannah Moyers – AUX3 (2019)
  54. 54. Extending to deployment
  55. 55. Third Revelation: Culture eats process for breakfast
  56. 56. Culture Eats Process for Breakfast  Practice grows in fertile soil  Find champions, then clone  Beware of Heroes  Who rules your roost?  Watch your incentives  Use inclusion to maximize ROI of your diversity  Choose your scrummasters wisely And you never see it coming
  57. 57. Questions? John Schrag Twitter: @jvschrag Build Measure Learn
  58. 58. Autodesk and the Autodesk logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and/or other countries. All other brand names, product names, or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Autodesk reserves the right to alter product and services offerings, and specifications and pricing at any time without notice, and is not responsible for typographical or graphical errors that may appear in this document. © 2018 Autodesk. All rights reserved.

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