Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Barbara Kok at WUD16

168 views

Published on

World Usability Day 2016 in Antwerp, Thursday, November 10th - Barbara Kok, teacher Product Design at LUCA School of Arts Genk

“Design process and perceived product quality”
We all want good product, but how can an designer increase the user experience of his/her product? Which components in the design process can have a positive effect on the perceived product quality? Are designers able to estimate the users’ experience? These questions will be addressed in this talk.

Barbara Kok is an ergonomist and teacher Product Design at the LUCA School of Arts. She recently finished her PhD on design process components and perceived product quality.

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

Barbara Kok at WUD16

  1. 1. Design process components and perceived product quality
  2. 2. Historically one of the priorities of design is to create a progression in the form of everyday experience (Beirne, 2011)
  3. 3. But… Usability User experience User centred design Human centred design Human Factors Ergonomics Participatory design …  bad user experience ?!
  4. 4. Exponential growth & increasing complexity of products
  5. 5. PhD research: Design process components and perceived product quality
  6. 6. Relation design process and perceived product quality
  7. 7. WHAT HAPPENS IN A DESIGN PROCESS?
  8. 8. • • Master Product Design education (LUCA School of Arts, Genk) • Bachelor & Master students Research participants 9
  9. 9. What happens in a design process? • State of the art • Design shaping methods • Ergonomic & functional study • Users involvement • Design research tools
  10. 10. State of the art Component in the design process all products re-designed products new designed products State of the art state of the art of similar products 100% state of the art of not-relating products 65% 48% 77% Technology, science(social science, etc.), materials etc. research: desk research 60% 19% 91% consulting specialists 45% 15% 69%
  11. 11. Design shaping methods Component in the design process all products re-designed products new designed products Design shaping methods sketching 94% 100% 89% rendering (CAD…) 53% 41% 63% tangible models 63% 82% 49% Working model 47% 70% 29%
  12. 12. Ergonomic & functional study Component in the design process all products (62) re-designed products (27) new designed products (35) Ergonomic and functional study consulting ergonomic guidelines 84% 93% 77% product function and task analysis (FTA) 94% 96% 91% product risk and mistake analysis (RMA) 66% 78% 57% FTA & RMA by self-testing 44% 56% 34% FTA & RMA designed product 61% 74% 51%
  13. 13. Users involvement Component in the design process all products re-designed products new designed products Users involvement (UI) questioning users 34% 30% 37% questioning users' companion(s) 31% 26% 34% observation 45% 48% 43% feedback on concepts and/or models feedback on concepts (2D) 24% 19% 29% feedback on models (3D) 19% 19% 20% feedback on working models 44% 70% 23%
  14. 14. Design research tools Component in the design process all products (62) re-designed products (27) new designed products (35) Design research tools design research tools 40% 26% 51%
  15. 15. Design for people specific needs or disabilities Component in the design process frequency State of the art (STA) state of the art of similar products 95% state of the art of non-relating products 100% Technology, materials, etc. research 100% Design shaping methods (DSM) 2D (sketching/rendering) 95% tangible models 79% Working model 68% Ergonomic & functional study (EFS) consulting ergonomic guidelines 90% product function and task analysis (FTA) 90% product risk and mistake analysis (RMA) 79% FTA & RMA by self-testing 47% FTA & RMA designed product 42% Users involvement (UI) questioning users 79% observation 68% feedback on concepts and/or models feedback on concepts (2D) 37% feedback on models (3D) 42% feedback on working models 47% Design research tools (DRT) design research tools 21%
  16. 16. Student VS professional
  17. 17. Student VS professional • Differences cause by • Context • Experience • …
  18. 18. WHAT AFFECTS THE PERCEIVED PRODUCT QUALITY? AND WHAT CAN LEAD TO (ACCEPTANCE OF) INNOVATION
  19. 19. Research • Innovation is technology driven (Norman & Verganti, 2014) • Innovation is created by creating new meaning (Verganiti 2014) • UX becomes important when people become more familiar (Norman & Verganti 2014)
  20. 20. Professionals (seat design) • Importance of involving all stake holders including management an OEM
  21. 21. Effect of the design process components on the perceived product quality
  22. 22. Re-design Positive effect on the PPQ: • ‘function, risk and mistake analysis of the designed product’
  23. 23. New design Positive effect on the PPQ: • ‘involving users by asking feedback on 2D concepts’ • ‘applying design research tools in the design process’
  24. 24. New design Negative effect on the PPQ: • ‘Consulting ergonomic guidelines’
  25. 25. Design for people with disabilities or special needs Positive effect on the PPQ: • ‘design shaping by making (working) models’ • ‘functional, risk and mistake analysis’ (of the designed product)’ • ‘user feedback on (working) concepts and models’
  26. 26. What about the other components?
  27. 27. No correlations because • Always applied • To moderate to measure • Interferences between components • Just no correlation
  28. 28. IMPORTANT DESIGN PROCESS COMPONENTS FOR CREATING COMFORT
  29. 29. CDP important for comfort (in seat design , based on professionals) • prototyping • function, risk and mistake analysis (of the designed product) • designing by making working models • focus groups • questioning users • Involving stakeholders
  30. 30. DESIGN VERSUS REAL WORLD
  31. 31. Can designers estimate the users perception of product quality?
  32. 32. DesignersVS users • Products for general target group: Strong correlation (= 0.743, p ≤ 0,000) between product assessment of designer and users
  33. 33. Designers VS users Products for people with specific needs or disabilities : no correlation (= 0.47, p = 0,066) between product assessment of designer and users
  34. 34. HOW TO INCREASE PERCEIVED PRODUCT QUALITY
  35. 35. Increasing perceived product quality by: • Applying design process components which can have a positive effect on the perceived product quality • Differentiate the design process in function of the design problem
  36. 36. Increasing perceived product quality by: • Involving users in the design process and assessment • Involve other stakeholders
  37. 37. Wanna know more… Repository.tudelft.nl PhD B.N.E. Kok
  38. 38. OTHER RESEARCH AT LUCA SCHOOL OF ARTS C-MINE
  39. 39. Sharing is caring Thick Documentation in Participatory Design Inspired by the sharing of source codes in Open Source Software and blueprints in Open Design, this PhD research investigated what form of documentation can extend and broaden participation of Participatory Design processes.
  40. 40. Traders (short for ‘Training Art and Design Researchers in Participation for Public Space’) How can art and design researchers contribute in interesting ways to engaging citizens, policy makers, private partners and other participants to participate in public space
  41. 41. Traders http://www.luca-arts.be/traders
  42. 42. Design - Dementia • Keep Forget: – Memories, stories and messages related to locations and places were translated in personal and public artefacts http://www.luca-arts.be/nieuws/keep-forget- andrea-wilkinson
  43. 43. Other • Participatory design with people with dementia , sensory or cognitive disabilities • Map-it • Empathy & communication media design • …
  44. 44. Any questions? 45
  45. 45. Thank you for your attention! 46
  46. 46. Info or questions barbara.kok@luca-arts.be

×