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ATV Safety Summit: State Legislation (Enforcement) - Policy-Oriented Prevention Strategies

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Jim Helmkamp, Senior Epidemiologist for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Western States Office, presented this at CPSC's ATV Safety Summit Oct. 12, 2012. State-specific ATV fatality rates were compared between 1990-1999 and 2000-2007 grouping states according to helmet, and training and licensure requirements (per SVIA state ATV requirement charts). 2,226 deaths occurred from 1990-1999 at a rate of 0.09 deaths per 100,000 population and 7,231 deaths from 2000-2007 at a rate of 0.32. Male rates were at least six times higher than female rates. Males accounted for about 86% of the deaths overall. Children under 17 years accounted for over one-third of the deaths in the earlier period decreasing to about 17% in the latter. The number of deaths increased 225% from the earlier period to the latter with a three-fold increase in the death rate. There was little collective difference between rates for states with or without helmet requirements and between states with or without training and licensure requirements. Policy-oriented prevention strategies over the past decade seem to have largely failed. This failure may be due to lack of enforcement and the casual attitude of many ATV riders to not wear a helmet or take training.

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ATV Safety Summit: State Legislation (Enforcement) - Policy-Oriented Prevention Strategies

  1. 1. ATV Safety Summit - ‘Keeping Families Safe on ATVs’ U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Bethesda, MD October 11-12, 2012 State Legislation: Enforcement’s Role in Regulation Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS Baby seat!!
  2. 2.  What the data tells us -- numbers and rates: gender differences Helmet use requirements -- gender -- age -- rate differences Training and licensure requirements -- gender -- age -- rate differences Conclusions
  3. 3. Group 1990-1999* 2000-2007** Change N (rate/100,000) N (rate/100,000) Male 1,935 (0.16) 6,215 (0.55) 221% (344%) Female 291 (0.02) 1,016 (0.09) 249% (450%) Totals 2,226 (0.09) 7,231 (0.32) 225% (356%) * Helmkamp, Am J Pub Health, 2001** Helmkamp et al, Pub Health Reports, 2012
  4. 4. Table 1. ATV-related Death Rates by Helmet Use Requirement, U.S. 2000-2007 − 38%Gender
  5. 5. Table 1. ATV-related Death Rates by Helmet Use Requirement, U.S. 2000-2007 − 38% − 23%Gender Gender ∆ (female-to-male): Helmet +650% (0.08 --- 0.52) No Helmet +582% (0.11 --- 0.64)
  6. 6. Table 1. ATV-related Death Rates by Helmet Use Requirement, U.S. 2000-2007 − 100%
  7. 7. Table 1. ATV-related Death Rates by Helmet Use Requirement, U.S. 2000-2007 − 100% − 42% Age (1-14) ∆ (female-to-male): Helmet +282% (0.11 --- 0.31) No Helmet +200% (0.22 --- 0.44)
  8. 8. Table 1. ATV-related Death Rates by Helmet Use Requirement, U.S. 2000-2007 − 50%
  9. 9. Table 2. ATV-related Death Rates by Training and Licensure Requirements, U.S. 2000-2007 − 25%
  10. 10. Table 2. ATV-related Death Rates by Training and Licensure Requirements, U.S. 2000-2007 − 25% − 13% Gender ∆ (female-to-male): Training +663% (0.08 --- 0.53) No Training +600% (0.10 --- 0.60)
  11. 11. Table 2. ATV-related Death Rates by Training and Licensure Requirements, U.S. 2000-2007 − 58%
  12. 12. Table 2. ATV-related Death Rates by Training and Licensure Requirements, U.S. 2000-2007 − 58% − 35% Age (1-14) ∆ (female-to-male): Training +258% (0.12 --- 0.31) No Training +221% (0.19 --- 0.42)
  13. 13. Table 2. ATV-related Death Rates by Training and Licensure Requirements, U.S. 2000-2007 − 24%
  14. 14.  Number and rate of death has increased significantly in both genders over the past 20 years Males account for nearly 90% of deaths and have rates significantly higher than females Some age groups are at higher risk; 1-14 and ≥65 Helmet and training requirements have slightly mitigated rates in states that have them, but legislative policies have not impacted the growing number of deaths Do enforcement of regulations and requirements play a role? Could a ‘graduated driver license’ approach be feasible in developing safety skills for young operators?
  15. 15. Contact information Jim Helmkamp NIOSH – Western States Office Denver Federal Center PO Box 25226 Denver, Colorado 80225 E-mail: jhelmkamp@cdc.gov Phone: 303-236-5943

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