Prairie Pines Arboretum 2009

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Prairie Pines Arboretum 2009

  1. 1. Prairie Pines Text by Walter Bagley Design by Taya Heinrich Locations by David Graham
  2. 2. Ginkgoaceae - ginkgo family Ginkgo biloba – ginkgo (56)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted, free of pests and animal damage.  A May 9th freeze after leaves had started to emerge caused death to a 10 ft. tree north of the office (not shown), but a fast growing root sprout emerged.  The tree in the photo is NE of the A-frame.  40.84361-96.56668  40.84446-96.56525
  3. 3. Pinaceae – pine family Abies balsamea - balsam fir (231)  Origin-unknown  Very well adapted to this site.  Trees planted in 1963 are growing near the hilltop in field A.  40.84355-96.56473  Trees planted in 1980 are growing in field D, row 14.  40.84425-96.56590
  4. 4. Pinaceae – pine family Abies concolor ‘Horning’ - white fir (213,135)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  ‘Horning’ is a name given to a tree selected from a planting at Horning State Farm.  The tree on the right is growing north of the A- frame, is a graft from the original tree at that site.  The tree on left, is several years younger and probably originated from a New Mexico forest.  40.84416-96.56599
  5. 5. Pinaceae – pine family Larix gmelinii - Dahurian larch (217)  Origin-unknown, but seed was probably collected in the Orient  Obtained from NSA.  Well adapted to our site.  Two trees grow northwest of A-frame.  Cones were collected in 2008.  40.84425-96.56590
  6. 6. Pinaceae – pine family Picea abies - Norway spruce (168)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  The first listed below grows on the lower edge of the northeast slope.  It is nearly twice as tall as trees in other locations.  It is a superior tree due to site or genotype.  40.84467-96.56934  40.84269-96.56715  40.84417-96.56627
  7. 7. Pinaceae – pine family Picea omorika - Serbian spruce (233)  Origin-unknown  Growth very slow possibly due to competition by adjacent large trees.  Growing in arboretum row 39.  Died in 2008.  40.84444-96.56478
  8. 8. Pinaceae – pine family Picea pungens - blue spruce (169)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Hans Burchardt yard (graft)  Well adapted to site.  This tree grows near the parking area northwest of office.  There are several nursery grown blue spruce remaining from a Christmas tree planting ranging from green to various shades of blue.
  9. 9. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus banksiana - jack pine (163)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to area  40.84284-96.56245
  10. 10. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus bungeana - lacebark pine (70)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  Very susceptible to deer browsing and rubbing.  40.84435-96.56506
  11. 11. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus bungeana - lacebark pine (223)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 900125.  Adapted to this area.  This tree has been injured by deer rubbing.  Located in row 17 field D.  40.84439-56581
  12. 12. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus edulis - pinyon pine (165)  Origin-unknown  The single tree on this site, over 45yrs. old, grows south of the driveway near the old farm house in a sunny location.  Other shaded trees died early in life.  40.84422-96.56716
  13. 13. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus nigra - Austrian pine (160)  Origin-Yugoslavia  This origin is resistant to needle blight disease.  This species is a component of windbreaks at Prairie Pines.
  14. 14. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus ponderosa - ponderosa pine (161)  Origin-Northern Nebr.  Well adapted to site.  A row of 13 trees grows north of A- frame.  40.84397-96.56574
  15. 15. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus strobiformis – southwestern white pine(164)  Origin-Southwestern USA  Some trees are adapted to site while others are subject to winter injury.  Needle blight can be a serious disease.  Several trees remain from a Christmas tree planting.  40.84366-96.56733  40.84444-96.56576
  16. 16. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus strobus - eastern white pine (162)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site, especially where protected from wind.  Many trees are growing on the office grounds, in windbreaks and former Christmas tree plantings.
  17. 17. Pinaceae – pine family Pinus sylvestris - Scotch pine (159)  Origin-unknown  Trees are dying from pests.
  18. 18. Pinaceae – pine family Pseudotsuga menziesii - Douglas fir (196)  Origin-Rocky Mountains  Trees planted in 1960 are living.  One grows northeast of the office.  40.84374-96.56507  40.84512-96.56570  40.84384-96.56594
  19. 19. Cupressaceae – cypress family Juniperus chinensis - Chinese juniper (174)  Origin-Cultivar ‘Hetzii’  Well adapted to site.  They grow along the driveway and near the west office foundation.  40.64342-96.56665
  20. 20. Cupressaceae – cypress family Juniperus chinensis - Chinese juniper (297)  Origin- ‘Pfitzeriana’  Well adapted to site. ‘Pfitzeriana’ is a low spreading juniper.  There are three growing in the yard around the old farm house.  40.84436-96.56700
  21. 21. Cupressaceae – cypress family Juniperus communis - common juniper (177)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 910182.  Adapted to sunny sites.  It grows on the road ditch bank at the southwest corner of Prairie Pines.
  22. 22. Cupressaceae – cypress family Juniperus horizontalis - creeping juniper (176)  Origin-’Ogalala’, ‘Sutton’  Very well adapted to sunny locations.  These two cultivars grow side by side on the road bank at the southwest corner of Prairie Pines.  40.84209-96.56750
  23. 23. Cupressaceae – cypress family Juniperus scopulorum - Rocky Mountain juniper (175)  Origin-unknown  Adapted to sunny locations.  Surviving on the outside row, eastern aspect of two windbreaks.  One is north of the windmill.  40.84717-96.56207
  24. 24. Cupressaceae – cypress family Juniperus virginiana - eastern redcedar (173)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to area.  A component of several windbreaks.  Many wildings are present throughout Prairie Pines.
  25. 25. Cupressaceae – cypress family Platycladus orientalis - Oriental arborvitae (152)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  This tree grows on the east side of the corn crib.  It originally was an under stock for a Juniperus species which has since died.  The seeds are prized food for squirrels.
  26. 26. Taxaceae – yew family Taxus xmedia ‘Hicksii’ Anglo-Japanese yew (154)  Origin-unknown  Very well adapted to site.  This columnar cultivar provides excellent winter protection for many feathered friends.  The plant in the photo is part of a row extending north of the office.  40.84383-96.56604  40.84348-96.56644
  27. 27. Taxaceae – yew family Taxus xmedia ‘Wardii’ - Anglo Japanese Yew (272)  Origin-hybrid  Well adapted to site.  Withstands shading.  It grows northeast of office, adjacent to a concolor fir.  40.84359-96.56610
  28. 28. Magnoliaceae – magnolia family Liriodendron tulipifera - tuliptree, yellow-poplar (81)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  The first number below identifies a tree 50ft. west of office.  40.84354-96.56680  40.84495-96.56573
  29. 29. Magnoliaceae – magnolia family Magnolia kobus - Kobus magnolia (20)  Origin-Ed Rasmussen  Hardy and adaptable seldom blooms before 15 yrs.  Subject to sun scald.  40.84452-96.56524
  30. 30. Annonaceae – custard apple family Asimina trilobum - pawpaw (11)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 1982.  Very shady location near concolor fir.  Excessive deer browsing.  40.84447-96.56555
  31. 31. Lauraceae – laurel family Sassafras albidum - Nees – sassafras (285)  Origin-unknown  Subject to winter injury in this region.  It grows west of office near the water well.  Has suffered from drought and shading.  It died in 2008.  40.84328-96.56694
  32. 32. Ranunculaceae – buttercup family Clematis heracleifolia var. davidiana - David’s fragrant tube-flower clematis (218)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 910147.  Well adapted, but short-lived.  Several wildings grow near the north parking area.  Plants also grow south of Virginia’s garden.  40.84314-96.56615
  33. 33. Ranunculaceae – buttercup family Clematis xjackmanii - Jackman clematis (267)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Nancy Scott  Requires a moist site.  It grows on a trellis near the south wall of the office.  40.84341-96.56638
  34. 34. Ranunculaceae – buttercup family Clematis terniflora - sweetautumn clematis (268)  Origin-unknown  It is well adapted to site.  Last 2 yrs. leaves disappeared in July, but promptly reappeared too late for blooming in Sept.  Wild turkeys relish the akenes which cling to vine through much of winter.  Grows on a trellis on south side of office.  40.84344-96.56647
  35. 35. Berberidaceae – barberry family Berberis thunbergii - Japanese barberry (138)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted, serving as a foundation plant at the old farm house.  40.84445-96.56724
  36. 36. Cercidiphyllaceae – katsuratree family Cercidiphyllum japonicum - katsuratree (204)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Tim Knott.  It grows adjacent to larger trees which may be affecting its health.  It grows about 100ft. northwest of the A- frame.  40.84418-96.56573
  37. 37. Plantanaceae – sycamore or planetree family Platanus occidentalis - American sycamore (55)  Origin-unknown  Seedling from provenance #14-1-2 in the Mead plantation.  Well adapted to site, Anthracnose-resistant.  Located near major drainage about 100 ft. north of Adams St.  40.84224-96.56177
  38. 38. Plantanaceae – sycamore or planetree family Platanus occidentalis American sycamore (58)  Origin-Seedling from UNL east campus (1959)  Well adapted to site.  Mildly susceptible to Anthracnose.  Two trees south of driveway at old farm house.  40.84420-96.56716  40.84435-96.56734
  39. 39. Hamaelidaceae – witch-hazel family Hamamelis vernalis vernal witch-hazel (225)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 910153.  Did not survive for a reason unknown.
  40. 40. Hamamelidaceae – witch-hazel family Hamamelis virginiana (239)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 940220.  It survived in a sunny location for a few years, but eventually died.
  41. 41. Hamamelidaceae – witch-hazel family Liquidambar styraciflua - sweetgum (64)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  It grows about 200ft. west of office.  40.84348-96.56692
  42. 42. Ulmaceae – elm family Celtis occidentalis - hackberry (203)  Origin-unknown  Progeny of trees in the 1940 farmstead windbreak north of the old farm house.  These trees are similar to those of east central KS. origin.  They are rapid growing, of good form, and very fruitful.  Several of these grow in the farmstead area.
  43. 43. Ulmaceae – elm family Ulmus americana – American elm (309)  Origin-unknown  Progeny of two trees growing at Prairie Pines in the 1960’s are growing in the farmstead area in 2009.  This tree grows in field D S.E of the barn.
  44. 44. Ulmaceae – elm family Ulmus japonica v. mandshurica Japanese elm (36)  Origin-unknown  Lincoln Oakes Nrsy. 1990.  Well adapted to this site.  40.84465-96.56489
  45. 45. Ulmaceae – elm family Ulmus parvifolia - Chinese elm (40)  Origin-unknown  Maxwell Arboretum seedling.  Suffers significant winter injury.  40.84464-96.56504
  46. 46. Ulmaceae – elm family Ulmus pumila – Siberian elm (310)  Origin- unknown  The northern two rows of the farmstead windbreak were planted in the 1940’s.  Wilding progeny are present throughout Prairie Pines.
  47. 47. Ulmaceae – elm family Ulmus thomasi rock elm (306)  Origin-Ponca State Park by Warren Dunkle  Obtained from NSA 010169.  Injury to the top occurred in 2008.  It grows in field D north of the A-frame.
  48. 48. Ulmaceae – elm family Zelkova serrata Japanese zelkova (110)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA.  Well adapted to site.  This tree is in row 39. of arboretum.  40.84469-96.56492
  49. 49. Moraceae – mulberry family Maclura pomifera osage-orange (32)  Origin-unknown  A gift of seedlings from an Omaha yard.  Served as living fences for the pioneers, later used as fence posts with the advent of barbed wire. Hot-burning firewood.  See hedgerow along Adams St.  40.84475-96.56505  40.84201-96.56538
  50. 50. Moraceae – mulberry family Morus alba white mulberry (157)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Many trees can be found in the area.  40.84301-96.56506
  51. 51. Juglandaceae – walnut family Carya cordiformis bitternut hickory (123)  Origin-Nebraska  A gift from Nancy Scott (1989).  Well adapted to site.  Located S.W. of office, south of the old volleyball court.  40.84278-96.56715
  52. 52. Juglandaceae – walnut family Carya illinoensis pecan (284)  Origin-unknown  Seed obtained from Saha farm north of Ceresco, Nebr.  Well adapted to site.  The nuts mature so late, that they often suffer from freezes.  The small tree pictured grows from a nut collected in Texas, and grows in field D N.W of the A-frame.  40.84417-96.56597  40.84314-96.56557
  53. 53. Juglandaceae – walnut family Carya laciniosa shellbark hickory (129)  Origin-Missouri  Well adapted to site, west of office about 150ft.40.  40.84339-96.56701
  54. 54. Juglandaceae – walnut family Carya ovata shagbark hickory (130)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  6 trees in windbreak row southeast of office.  40.84279-96.56653  One tree in row 43 arboretum and another near 112th north of driveway.  40.84381-96.56728  Bottom land  40.84742-96.56443  40.84739-96.56432
  55. 55. Juglandaceae – walnut family Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis heartnut (197)  Origin-unknown  Six trees planted in the orchard area east of the office, two have died of unknown causes.  40.84355-96.56557
  56. 56. Juglandaceae – walnut family Juglans cinerea butternut (199)  Origin-unknown  It’s not fruitful in this location.  This tree grows in the valley northeast of office.  40.84716-96.56443
  57. 57. Juglandaceae – walnut family Juglans nigra black walnut (200)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected from Topeka, KS. Park.  Well adapted and bears fruit annually, but fruit often does not ripen before freezing weather.  It grows about 200ft. southeast of office.  40.84312-96.56630  A tree of the same origin grows well, but seldom produces fruit.  It is west of office about 200ft.
  58. 58. Juglandaceae – walnut family Juglans nigra ‘Thomas’ black walnut (262)  Origin-unknown  Grafted tree, a gift from Hans Burchardt 1959.  Very well adapted to area, very fruitful.  Grows north of barn in the old orchard area.  40.84453-96.56657
  59. 59. Juglandaceae – walnut family Juglans nigra black walnut (295)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to sites.  The location below refers to trees east of windbreak around the office complex.  40.84290-96.56551  Many black walnut grow in plantations throughout Prairie Pines.
  60. 60. Juglandaceae – walnut family Juglans nigra black walnut (299)  Origin-unknown  A selection by Archie Sparks.  Well adapted to area.  Two trees grow at the confluence of the two main drainages on Prairie Pines.  40.84689-96.56527
  61. 61. Fagaceae – beech family Castanea dentata American chestnut (2)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected from Arbor Lodge.  Original tree dead.  Several seedlings living, one west of house is healthy.  40.84423-96.56554  40.84108-96.56533  40.84454-96.56501
  62. 62. Fagaceae – beech family Castanea mollissima Chinese chestnut (170,303)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to area.  Two trees grow on the edge of the orchard east of the office.  40.84322-96.56567  One young tree grows in the front yard of the old farm house.  40.84440-96.56713
  63. 63. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus acutissima sawtooth oak (8)  Origin-unknown  ‘Gobbler’ cultivator  Several specimens well adapted to Prairie Pines sites.  40.84418-96.5655  40.84454-96.56501
  64. 64. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus coccinea scarlet oak (22)  Origin-unknown  Leaf color depends upon latitude of seed origin to latitude of growing site, often mistaken for black oak, Q. velutina.  At Prairie Pines leaf color change occurred on 10-18- 92 dormancy breaks mid May.  40.84465-96.56521
  65. 65. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus imbricaria shingle oak (108)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Brilliant red in early Oct.  It is located in row 40 of the arboretum.
  66. 66. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus palustris pin oak (183)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to area, with no signs of chlorosis.  One tree grows north of the driveway west of the quonset.  A row of 8 trees grow east of the A- frame.
  67. 67. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus phellos x palustris Rich’s oak (137)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Rich Lodes.  The tree in the photo grows north of the A frame.  4 fast-growing healthy trees, variable leaf shapes and coloration grow in row 45 in the arboretum area.  The leaves in the lower left are from two trees in row 45.
  68. 68. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus rubra northern red oak (12)  Origin –native, collected from Fontanelle Forest by Bagley in 1998.  Many limbs broken in snowstorm 10-26-97.  40.84439-96.56541
  69. 69. Fagaceae – beech family red oak group Quercus rubra northern red oak (79)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  40.84437-96.56458
  70. 70. Fagaceae – breech family red oak group Quercus velutina black oak (38)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Richard Sutton.  Well adapted to this site.  40.84454-96.56501
  71. 71. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus alba white oak (6)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to the site.  40.84441-96.56526
  72. 72. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus alba white oak (26)  Origin-Decatur County, Iowa collected by Bagley  Southeast of office on terrace.  Well adapted to site.  40.84312-96.36660
  73. 73. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus bicolor swamp white oak (10)  Origin-unknown  Seeds collected from Woods Park in Lincoln.  Well adapted to the site.  40.84434-96.56471  40.84430-96.56544
  74. 74. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus gambelii Gambel oak (184)  Origin-Castle Rock, CO.  These slow growing trees are adapted to sunny dry rocky sites.  The trees at Prairie Pines survived for several years before being over topped.
  75. 75. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus lyrata overcup oak (103)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected from a tree on Randolph str. at about 36th str.  Well adapted to site.  40.84439-96.56513
  76. 76. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus macrocarpa bur oak (124)  Origin-Oklahoma  Well adapted to site, no winter injury to date, (2008).  40.84336-96.56677  50ft. S.W of office  40.84376-96.56622  50ft. N.E of office  40.84905-96.56723  N.W. corner Prairie Pines
  77. 77. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus xbebbiana hybrid  Origin-unknown  This tree grew from an acorn planted in 1960.  It produced acorns of unusually enlarged size at age 8.  The acorns resembled those of a bur oak except there was no ‘bur’ or fringe around the cup.  The leaves don’t show fall color.  It grows west of the corn crib.
  78. 78. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus macrocarpa bur oak (278)  Origin-native  Very well adapted to this region.  This tree was planted in memory of Virginia’s mother, Clarabelle.  It grows about half way between entrance driveways, north of office.  40.84392-96.56697
  79. 79. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus macrocarpa bur oak (255)  Origin-Nebraska  Very well adapted to area.  Several trees are scattered throughout the farm.  40.84392-96.56697  40.84377-96.56698  40.84385-96.56619
  80. 80. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus muehlenbergii chinkapin oak (109)  Origin-Kansas forest south of Manhattan  The 6 in. seedling was dug with a penknife 1960.  The close up photo is of the tree north of the driveway, N.W. of office.  40.84454-96.56501  40.84435-96.56536
  81. 81. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus prinoides dwarf chinkapin oak (254)  Origin-unknown  Gift from Richard Sutton.  Well adapted to area, grows northwest of A- frame.
  82. 82. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus prinus chestnut oak (14)  Origin-Southeastern U.S.  Well adapted to site.  Original two trees are southwest of office.  Seedlings of these trees are growing in the arboretum N.E. of office.  40.844435-96.56536
  83. 83. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus robur English oak (61)  Origin-unknown  This is the second tree of this origin that has suffered severe top injury.  One tree is west of office on the terrace about 100ft east of 112th str.  40.84340-96.56718  40.84451-96.56510
  84. 84. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus robur English oak (114)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Michigan State Univ.  Well adapted to site.  On a terrace about one fourth mile east of office.  Acorns are shorter than those of the classic species.  It’s probably a hybrid.  Tree in photo has been named ‘Big Boy’.  40.84277-96.56255
  85. 85. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus robur English oak (126)  Origin-unknown  Progeny of a narrow crowned tree obtained from Michigan State University.  Well adapted to site, row 42, arboretum, two trees.  40.84290-96.56040
  86. 86. Fagaceae – beech family white oak group Quercus robur English oak (127)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected on UNL east campus from a tree dubbed the ‘Russian oak’.  Well adapted to site.  East end row 42.
  87. 87. Fagaceae – breech family white oak group Quercus stellata post oak (122)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA in 1990.  Well adapted to site.  Row 41, arboretum.
  88. 88. Betulaceae – birch family Betula lenta sweet birch (115)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Jon Morgensen.  Moderate growth on a shady site.  40.84432-96.56495
  89. 89. Betulaceae – birch family Carpinus caroliniana American hornbeam (44)  Origin-unknown (1982)  Well adapted to this site.  40.84443-96.56498  40.84441-96.56501
  90. 90. Betulaceae – birch family Ostrya virginiana American hophornbeam (23)  Origin-unknown  Native to Nebr., scattered throughout much of the state.  Pest resistant, lacks showy flowers, but displays distinctive bark, catkins &fruits at maturity.  One grows along trail N.E. of office.  40.84317-96.56710  40.84373-96.56591  40.84330-96.56704
  91. 91. Tiliaceae – American basswood Tilia americana American basswood (286)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  It grows near the northeast corner of A- frame.  40.84390-96.56567
  92. 92. Tiliaceae – American basswood Tilia cordata littleleaf linden (100)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to sites.  One tree is about 100ft. west of office.  Tree in photo is in white pine forest.  40.84396-96.56526  40.84342-96.56686  40.84416-96.56554  40.84501-96.56567
  93. 93. Tiliaceae – American basswood Tilia tomentosa silver linden (53)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Ed Rasmussen.  Slow growing, probably because of dense shading. N.E. of A-frame.  40.84345-96.56555
  94. 94. Salicaceae – willow family Populus deltoides eastern cottonwood (250)  Origin-unknown  This tree grew from a seed that floated over from an adjourning farmstead in 1970’s.  This site had been seeded to switch grass a few years earlier and was well established.  Three cottonwood seedlings appeared above the grass, is an unlikely event.  Normally cottonwood seedling appear only on bare soil and most often on wet soil along a stream bank.
  95. 95. Salicaceae – willow family Populus deltoides ‘Ohio Red’ eastern cottonwood (251)  Origin-Ohio  Well adapted to site.  One grows in valley beside the ‘Platte’.  One grows east of office.  Cuttings root only from the base of the hardwood cutting.  40.84535-96.56404  40.84240-96.56184
  96. 96. Salicaceae – willow family Populus xcanadensis ‘Nor’easter’ hybrid poplar (252)  Origin-N.E. Forest Exp. Sta.  Short-lived due to stem canker disease, resistant to leaf rust.  Female clone produces sterile seed.  Grows near ‘Platte’.  40.84535-96.56404
  97. 97. Salicaceae – willow family Populus tremuloides quaking aspen (90)  Origin-Columbus Nebr.  Discovered by Allen Wilke.  Short lived, but reproduces by copious root sprouts.  Leaves do not exhibit bright fall color.  The tree in photo is a transplanted root sprout.  40.84328-96.56651  40.84446-96.56525
  98. 98. Salicaceae – willow family Salix amygdaloides peachleaf willow (65)  Origin-native  Well adapted to stream banks.  The photo is a tree south of windmill, one of several trees at Prairie Pines.  40.8555-96.56242
  99. 99. Ebenaceae – ebony family Diospyrus virginiana persimmon (34)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  40.84472-96.56506
  100. 100. Grossulariaceae – currant family Ribes missouriense Missouri gooseberry (181)  Origin-native wildings  Well adapted to sites.  All are volunteer seedlings found in many locations.  40.84375-96.56671
  101. 101. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Spiraeoideae Spiraea xcinerea cinerea spirea (216)  Origin-unknown  Propagated NSA.  Adapted, but was soon over-topped by adjacent trees and severely browsed by deer.  Grew about 100ft. north of A-frame.  Dead in 2009.  40.84407-96.56588
  102. 102. Rosaceae – rose family Amelanchier arborea shadblow serviceberry (80)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to shady site.  Due to a confusion in naming the Amelanchier species, we are including A. laevis and A. canadensis under this name.  Near original corn crib.  Usually blooms and bears fruit.  40.84391-96.56637  40.84441-96.56526
  103. 103. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Aronia melanocarpa black chokeberry (42)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 890207.  Became well established, suffered severe deer browsing.  Eventually died from shading.
  104. 104. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Cotoneaster integerrimus European cotoneaster (97)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from Lincoln Oakes(1986).  Well adapted to site.  It is in field D the 6th plant east of the west end of row 40.
  105. 105. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Cotoneaster lucidus hedge cotoneaster (208)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted, but somewhat short-lived.  Often confused with C. acutifolius.  It grows south of the garage.  40.84335-96.56632
  106. 106. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Crataegus ambigua European singleseed hawthorn (224)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 920156.  Adapted to area.  It’s located at the east end of row 41, field D in the arboretum area.
  107. 107. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Crataegus crusgalli cockspur hawthorn (94)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Highly susceptible to leaf rust.  40.84436-96.56517  40.84373-96.56756
  108. 108. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Malus pumila x baccata crabapple (1)  Origin-unknown  Copious red flowers and red fruits.  Cultivar ‘Vanguard’ loses leaves mid- summer to Cedar- Apple rust.  Office in front yard, removed in 2009.  40.84357-96.56641
  109. 109. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Malus sp ‘Red Splendor’ crabapple (75)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site, but subject to cedar- apple rust.  Very similar to ‘Vanguard’(1).  40.84412-96.56550
  110. 110. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Malus baccata ‘Midwest’ Siberian crabapple (76)  Origin-unknown  Propagated by NRCS Plant Materials Center, Bismarck N.D.  Well adapted to site.  Growing in the center of office parking.  This specimen blooms profusely, but never produces fruit.  40.84383-96.56617
  111. 111. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Malus pumila Bonni-Best common apple (155)  Origin-Wisconsin  Propagated and released by the University of Wis.  Well adapted to this area.  The first apples were produced in 2008.  40.84319-96.56557
  112. 112. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Malus sargentii Sargent crabapple (33)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  It is very fruitful.  40.84473-96.56509  40.84437-96.56723
  113. 113. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Pyrus calleryana callery pear (179)  Origin-unknown  Propagated and released by an experiment station in South central Canada (1975).  Well adapted to site.  One plant grows east of garage.  Another is west of office.  One is at the west end of a tree row along Adams St.  40.84352-96.56623  40.84354-96.56712
  114. 114. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Pyrus communis common pear (192)  Origin- unknown  Well adapted to site.  This cultivar, ‘Maxine’, has been a consistent producer of fruit.  40.84332-96.56567
  115. 115. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Maloideae Pyrus ussuriensis Ussurian pear (39)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  40.84441-96.56484
  116. 116. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Rosoideae Rosa arkansana var. suffulta Arkansas rose (185)  Origin-native  This plant is growing in the prairie on the southeast corner of Prairie Pines.
  117. 117. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Rosoideae Rosa eglanteria sweet brier (215)  Origin- unknown  Gift from Nancy Scott.  Adapted, vigorous growth in early years but deteriorated with age.  Growing near the west water hydrant in north garden area.  40.84425-96.56599
  118. 118. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Rosoideae Rosa multiflora multiflora rose (187)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  This plant grows south of the old windmill.  It is one of several wildings.  40.84420-96.56180
  119. 119. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Rosoideae Rosa sp. Rose (186)  Origin- unknown  Very well adapted to area.  This cultivar ‘Fairy’ grows along the walk leading from the north office entrance.  40.84350-96.56650
  120. 120. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Rosoideae Prunus angustifolia chickasaw plum (280)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA- 010096.  Well adapted to site.  It grows in field D N.W of the A frame since 2002.  40.84412-96.56593
  121. 121. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus americana American plum (194)  Origin-native  One native plant grows near the mail box.
  122. 122. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus americana American plum (235)  Origin-selected and propagated by SD State Univ., selection # 288  Well adapted to the site, crowding by adjacent trees, has reduced vigor.  Fruits are large.  No root sucker growth.  It grows east edge of orchard located east of office.
  123. 123. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus hortulana hortulan plum (136)  Origin-unknown  Seedling parent grows at Horning State Farm.  Colorful fruits ripen in Sept.  Tree in photo is too shaded to be fruitful.  Near west end of row 42, arboretum area.  40.84454-96.56501
  124. 124. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus maackii Amur chokecherry (89)  Origin-unknown  Propagated by NSA(1987).  Well adapted to site.  At age 10 was flattened by a late Oct. snow.  The photo shows 10 yr. old sprout growth.  84449-96.56525
  125. 125. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus serotina black cherry (113)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  This seedling was obtained from the Musser Nrsy.  This tree is near the water well west of the office.  40.84325-96.56703  40.84440-96.56490
  126. 126. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus serotina var. salicifolia Capulin cherry (37)  Origin-a hybrid resulting from a cross of Capulin cherry with our native black cherry, created by Dr. Meader, Univ. of NH  Well adapted to this site.  Prolific fruiting has resulted in many trees.  Tree in photo is S.E. of office.  See #113 for the native species.  40.84382-96.56677  40.84327-96.56625  40.84514-96.56579
  127. 127. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus serotina black cherry (57)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to the site.  The tree in photo is east of the A-frame.  40.84441-96.56514  40.84380-96.56577
  128. 128. Rosaceae – rose family Subfamily Prunoideae Prunus virginiana common chokecherry (195)  Origin-native  Well adapted, but sometimes short-lived due to disease.  ‘Shubert’ was short- lived at Prairie Pines.  Native wildings are thriving near the metal corn crib and on the north edge of Virginia’s garden.  40.84554-96.56602
  129. 129. Caesalpiniaceae – caesalpinia family Cercis canadensis eastern redbud (112)  Origin-unknown  Seed at the Maxwell Arboretum, UNL.  Well adapted to site.  Several trees of this origin are growing at Prairie Pines.  Trees of another unknown source suffered severe winter injury, the few remaining are in very poor condition.  40.84457-96.56702
  130. 130. Caesalpiniaceae – caesalpinia family Gleditsia triacanthos honeylocust (91)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected at the Bagley Hills, Colorado ranch from trees planted in the early 1900’s.  Well adapted to site.  These trees were growing on a sandy hill among native prairie plants.  40.84437-96.56529
  131. 131. Caesalpiniaceae – caesalpinia family Gleditsia triacanthos honeylocust (121)  Origin-Georgia  This tree is grown from the ‘Calhoun’ cultivar growing at Horning State Farm.  Well adapted to site, row 40 arboretum.  It is noted for its thick fleshy pods, high in sugar.  40.84269-96.56613  A 1995 planting of two rows of ‘Calhoun’ seedlings is located at:  40.84742-96.56359
  132. 132. Caesalpiniaceae – caesalpinia family Gleditsia triacanthos honeylocust (257)  Origin-unknown  Very well adapted to site.  It grows at the northwest corner of A- frame.  40.84400-96.56590
  133. 133. Caesalpiniaceae – caesalpinia family Gymnocladus dioicus Kentucky coffee tree (69)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected from east campus UNL.  Well adapted to this site.  Tree in photo near S.W. corner of office.  40.84342-96.56665  40.84444-96.56507  40.84496-96.56554  40.84537-96.56574
  134. 134. Fabaceae – pea family Cladrastis kentukea yellowood (119)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  The tree in the upper photo is in row 39 of the arboretum.  The lower tree is S.E. of office about 50ft east of clothesline among taller trees in a windbreak.  40.84325-96.56596  40.84444-96.56482
  135. 135. Fabaceae – pea family Robinia pseudoacacia black locust (191)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to area.  Many trees have proliferated from the original trees planted west of the native prairie.  40.84264-96.56058
  136. 136. Elaeagnaceae – oleaster family Eleagnus angustifolia Russianolive (281)  Origin-unknown  Native to Central Asia and Southern Europe.  Short-lived in eastern Nebr. due to disease.  The original tree is dead, this is a wilding.
  137. 137. Elaeagnaceae – oleaster family Elaeagnus umbellata autumnolive (28)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected at Horning State Farm.  Scattered wildings.  Nitrogen-fixing capability.  Flowers attract bees, birds eat red tasty fruits scattering seeds far and wide.
  138. 138. Elaeagnaceae – oleaster family Hippophae rhamnoides seabuckthorn (96)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from Lincoln-Oakes(1986).  Appeared to be adapted, but was dead at about age 15yrs.
  139. 139. Nyssaceae – tupelo family Nyssa sylvatica black tupelo (211)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Leaves become a brilliant red in early Oct.  Located about 200ft. north of A-frame.  40.84426-96.56559
  140. 140. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus alternifolia pagoda dogwood (48, 256)  Origin-unknown (1992)  Well adapted to this site.  40.84417-96.56635  Another specimen is established S.E. of the barn.  40.84417-96.96635
  141. 141. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus alba tatarian dogwood (291)  Origin-unknown  Has adapted to site.  Major problem is browsing by deer.  Photo is the west end of dogwood lane.  40.84445-96.56471
  142. 142. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus ammonum silky dogwood (21)  Origin-unknown  Native of S.E. Nebr. along stream edges.  Similar to rough leaf, C. drummondii.  40.84456-96.56521
  143. 143. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus drummondii roughleaf dogwood (50)  Origin-Prairie Pines native  Several specimens are scattered through out the farm.  One clump grows south of wind break about 100 yards east of barn.
  144. 144. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus foemina ssp. Racemosa gray dogwood (292, 63, 102)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Major problem is browsing by deer.  It alternates with C. alba in a row along dogwood lane.  40.84389-96.56654  Location below is in the vicinity of old farm house.  40.84399-96.56736
  145. 145. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus paucinerva few nerved dogwood (131)  Origin-unknown  Gift from the Blair arboretum.  Thriving in a sunny site after several yrs. struggling in the shade.  About 50 ft. south of Virginia’s garden.  40.84317-96.56623
  146. 146. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus mas Corneliancherry dogwood (19, 49)  Origin-natives of Persia  No known pests, fruitful after 3-4 yrs., never misses thereafter in spite of freezes during flowering.  Specimen on the left is a gift from the Blair arboretum.  The top photo shows the trees in bloom in late March.  40.84361-96.56667  40.84375-96.56691  40.84452-96.58526  40.84312-96.56707  40.84416-96.56609
  147. 147. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus florida flowering dogwood (51)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  One specimen about 50 ft. N.W. of office, and another N.E. of A-frame.  40.84345-96.5668
  148. 148. Cornaceae – dogwood family Cornus kousa Japanese dogwood (87)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  It has produced flowers one or more years.  The tree in photo is the first # below.  40.84416-96.56528  40.84450-96.56519
  149. 149. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Celastrus scandens American bittersweet (150)  Origin-Decatur Co., IA.  Well adapted native.  Vigorous vines will quickly engulf adjacent structures and trees, sometimes killing the latter.  One grows near the A- frame.  40.84353-96.56676
  150. 150. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Euonymus alata winged euonymus (210)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to partial shade.  This plant grows north of the garage.  It is very fruitful resulting in many seedlings near the shrub.  Leaves on parent plant are brilliant red in late Oct., but seedling leaf coloration is erratic.  40.84359-96.56629
  151. 151. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Euonymus atropurpurea eastern wahoo (17)  Origin-unknown  Colorful leaves and fruits in fall.  The close up shows the flowers.  Was moved from the Weese farm adjoining Prairie Pines.  40.84445-96.56532
  152. 152. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Euonymus bungeana winterberry euonymus (15)  Origin-unknown  ‘Pink Lady’  Specimen under sycamore thriving but no fruit, west of office.  Sycamore in sun on terrace N.E. of office in poor health (2008).  40.84354-96.56873  40.84438-96.56544
  153. 153. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Euonymus europea European burningbush (13)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 79061.  Vigorous and fruitful.  40.84442-96.56538
  154. 154. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Euonymus europaea European burningbush (139)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA (1991).  Well established.  Two trees embrace the driveway north of office.  One is growing north of Virginia’s garden.  40.84359-96.56610  40.84379-96.56664
  155. 155. Celastraceae – bittersweet family Euonymus fortunei wintercreeper (259)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to shady locations.  It grows north of office and attached garage.
  156. 156. Buxaceae – boxwood family Buxus microphylla littleleaf boxwood (141)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA(1989).  The lower photographed plant grows in a sunny location south of the office brick patio.  The higher photo grows in full shade at the north office entrance.  Both are healthy.  40.84354-96.56644  40.84338-96.56631
  157. 157. Rhamnaceae – buckthorn family Ceanothus americanus Jerseytea ceanothus (241)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 970061.  It’s well adapted to site.  Grows north of office, east of sidewalk, in the rock garden.  40.84363-96.56651
  158. 158. Vitaceae – grape family Parthenocissus inserta thicket creeper (271)  Origin-native  Well adapted to area.  Several vines grow in the vicinity of office and throughout Prairie Pines.  40.84340-96.56627
  159. 159. Vitaceae – grape family Vitus riparia riverbank grape (276)  Origin-native  Well adapted to region.  It grows in many locations among the trees on Prairie Pines.
  160. 160. Sapindaceae – soapberry family Koelreuteria paniculata goldenraintree (31)  Origin-unknown  A wilding from a Lincoln yard.  Healthy and thriving on this site. N. of office in the yard.  40.84357-96.56650  40.84357-96.56498
  161. 161. Hippocastanaceae – horsechestnut family Aesculus glabra Ohio buckeye (24)  Origin-unknown  Seed from UNL east campus.  Leaf rust that alternates with big blue stem deters growth of young seedlings.  Native of S.E. Nebr.  40.84464-96.56512
  162. 162. Hippocastanaceae – horsechestnut family Aesculus hippocastanum horsechestnut (4)  Origin-unknown  Seed from UNL east campus.  Well adapted several trees in the arboretum.  One is located west of the office.  40.84345-96.56704  40.84417-96.56556  40.84501-96.56584
  163. 163. Hippocastanaceae – horsechestnut family Aesculus octandra yellow buckeye (46)  Origin-unknown  Seed from UNL east campus.  Well adapted to site.  40.84311-96.56712, near water well west of office.  40.84432-96.56499  40.84440-96.56509  40.84373-96.56591
  164. 164. Aceraceae – maple family Acer buergerianum trident maple (222)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 910033.  Well adapted to area.  This tree is located north of A-frame in row 17 field D.  40.84438-96.56578
  165. 165. Aceraceae- maple family Acer campestre hedge maple (18)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA (1982).  Native of Europe and North Africa.  Well adapted to many Great Plains sites.  N.E. of office on terrace ridge.  40.84447-96.56530
  166. 166. Aceraceae – maple family Acer griseum paperbark maple (265)  Origin-unknown  It has adapted to site.  One grows south of driveway entrance to the old farm house.  40.84399-96.56736  Another grows in field D, row 12.  40.84438-96.56579
  167. 167. Aceraceae – maple family Acer henryi ivy-leaved maple (243)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA (1998).  Well adapted to the site.  A potted 3ft. seedling in leaf was planted in late April.  It grows about 200ft. north of A-frame, row 15, field D.  40.84434-96.56558
  168. 168. Aceraceae – maple family Acer negundo boxelder (156)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this area.  Tree in this photo, was growing about 100ft. south of the farm house.  It has since died, but a few seedlings can be found in the area.  40.84399-96.56715
  169. 169. Aceraceae – maple family Acer platanoides Norway maple (301)  Origin-unknown  Seed collected on east campus UNL.  Well adapted to site.  Grows southeast of the old farm house on the north side of the chicken house.  40.84429-96.56685
  170. 170. Aceraceae – maple family Acer saccharinum silver maple (287)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site, however it may suffer from dry weather.  Three trees grow south of office.  40.84350-96.56706
  171. 171. Aceraceae – maple family Acer saccharum ssp. nigrum black sugar maple (52)  Origin-unknown  Seed obtained from McLean residence in Wymore, Ne.  It grows at the west edge of the parking north of office.  40.84358-96.56671
  172. 172. Aceraceae – maple family Acer saccharum ssp. saccharum-sugar maple (67)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  Tree with the green leaves in the photo is at the first location below, and is of southern origin.  The tree with orange-red leaves is of northern origin, and exhibits color in mid Sept.  40.84476-96.56469  40.84373-96.56574  40.84365-96.56663
  173. 173. Aceraceae – maple family Acer tataricum ssp. ginnala Amur maple (151)  Origin-unknown  Very well adapted to site.  This genotype does not show fall color on this site.  Prolific seed production results in many wildings.  40.84328-96.56612
  174. 174. Aceraceae – maple family Acer truncatum purpleblow maple (142)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 910157.  Very well adapted to site north of A-frame.  40.84432-96.56577
  175. 175. Anacardiaceae – sumac family Cotinus obovatus American smoketree (143)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 910161.  Very well adapted, displays beautiful red leaves in early fall.  About 200ft. North of A-frame.  40.84430-96.56567
  176. 176. Anacardiaceae – sumac family Rhus aromatica fragrant sumac (106)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  40.84431-96.56532
  177. 177. Anacardiaceae –sumac family Rhus copallina flameleaf sumac (77)  Origin-unknown  Suffers winter dieback, colorful fall foliage.  See photo 9-25-06  40.84437-96.56529
  178. 178. Anacardiaceae – sumac family Rhus glabra smooth sumac (227)  Origin-native  Well adapted to site.  It grows in several locations along the road sides at Prairie Pines.  40.84229-96.55940
  179. 179. Anacardiaceae – sumac family Toxicodendron radicans ssp. Negundo poisonivy (275)  Origin-native  Very well adapted to the region.  The many plants growing on Prairie Pines may have originated from an old vine growing on the north bank of Adams St., about straight south of the office.  40.84205-96.56660
  180. 180. Anacardiaceae – sumac family Rhus typhina staghorn sumac (178)  Origin-unknown  A gift from the Wissink’s yard.  It’s adapted to this area.  The plant at the southwest corner of Prairie Pines has died after about 10yrs. but, root sprouts are appearing.  40.84225-96.56744
  181. 181. Simaroubaceae – quassia family Ailanthus altissima tree-of-heaven (258)  Origin-unknown  Subject to winter injury.  Survives by stump sprouts and copious root suckers.  Grows about 50ft. North of A-frame.  40.84413-96.56566
  182. 182. Araliaceae – ginseng family Hedera helix English ivy (311)  Origin-unknown  This plant grows in a shaded location near the metal corn crib among many other vines and shrubs.
  183. 183. Apocynaceae – dogbane family Vinca minor periwinkle (288)  Origin-unknown  Native to Europe and western Asia.  It thrives in shady areas in several locations around the office yard.  40.84332-96.56618
  184. 184. Verbenaceae – vervain family Callicarpa japonica Japanese beautyberry (236)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 930029.  It is well adapted to area.  Abundant and beautiful fruits in Oct. 2008.  Grows in row 15 field D.
  185. 185. Oleaceae – olive family Forsythia suspensa weeping forsythia (261,88)  Origin-unknown  Very well adapted to area.  Grows on the north edge of driveway, east of attached garage.  This plant seldom blooms because Harris sparrows, roosting in adjacent yews, feed on the flower buds.  This photo on the lower right is ‘Meadowlark’ growing northeast of the A-frame, which suffers from deer browse.  4084432-96.56531
  186. 186. Oleaceae – olive family Fraxinus americana white ash (60)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  40.84446-96.56515
  187. 187. Oleaceae – olive family Fraxinus bungeana (248)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA- 960194.  Apparently adapted to this site.  It grows in field E., northeast of the A-frame, row 39.  40.84451-96.56457
  188. 188. Oleaceae – olive family Fraxinus pennsylvanica green ash (16)  Origin-Region wide provenance study  A row of several provenances borders 112th street north of the bridge.  40.84726-96.56719  Many specimens of unknown origin grow throughout Prairie Pines, many of them wildings.
  189. 189. Oleaceae – olive family Ligustrum vulgare European privet (296)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  It grows near west office foundation.  40.64342-96.56665
  190. 190. Oleaceae – olive family Syringa pekinensis Pekin lilac (228)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 920061.  It is well adapted to this site.  40.84318 96.56707 5.23
  191. 191. Oleaceae – olive family Syringa reticulata Japanese tree lilac (30)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Ed Rasmussen(1982).  Well adapted to this site.  40.84448-96.56502
  192. 192. Oleaceae – olive family Syringa vulgaris common lilac (158)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to the area.  One plant is located S.E. of the original chicken house.  40.84367-96.56609
  193. 193. Oleaceae – olive family Syringa xvulgaris French hybrid lilac (270)  Origin-unknown  It was adapted to site but reduced in vigor by shading.  It grows about 50ft. south of office.  40.84325-96.56647
  194. 194. Oleaceae – olive family Syringa villosa late lilac (41)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA (1990).  Never well established, died 1993.
  195. 195. Oleaceae – olive family Syringa wolfii (229)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 920060.  Did not survive transplanting.
  196. 196. Bignoniaceae – bignonia family Campsis radicans trumpet-vine (149)  Origin-unknown  Very well adapted, blooms profusely nearly all summer.  Once established, it soon will form a thicket by root sprouts. A vine that can be trained into a small tree.  40.84340-96.56612
  197. 197. Bignoniaceae – bignonia family Catalpa bignoniodes southern catalpa (202)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to area.  Several seedlings have volunteered in the vicinity.  The tree in the photo grows east of the old farm house.  A row of catalpa grows northeast of office on a terrace ridge with oaks and other hardwoods.  40.84373-96.56696  40.84348-96.56348
  198. 198. Bignoniaceae – bignonia family Catalpa xfargesii Farges Catalpa (266)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA 020012.  Fast growing, but subject to winter injury.  It grows near row 12 field D.  40.84420-96.56618
  199. 199. Rubiaceae – madder family Cephalanthus occidentalis buttonbush (111)  Origin-unknown, native in southeast Nebr.  Obtained from NSA (1989).  Well adapted to site.  Dense shade on the plants in row 39 has reduced vigor.  40.84434-96.56498  Plants growing in the valley east of office, are healthy.
  200. 200. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Kolkwitzia amabilis beautybush (201)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted and continues to grow and bloom after being overtopped by adjacent trees.  It grows about 20ft. from the northwest corner of office.  40.84344-96.56669
  201. 201. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Lonicera hirsuta (172)  Origin-unknown  A gift from Jon Morgensen’s yard (1992).  It grows in row 41 of the arboretum.
  202. 202. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Lonicera korolkowii blueleaf honeysuckle (98)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA(1987).  Dead possibly due to shading.
  203. 203. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Lonicera maackii Amur honeysuckle (209)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site, sometimes short-lived.  Copious fruits are devoured by birds, resulting in many wildings.  The plant in photo is on the south edge of Virginia’s garden.  40.84901-96.56593  40.84368-96.56674
  204. 204. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Lonicera maximowiczii var. sachalinensis Sachalin honeysuckle (99)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA (1987).  Appeared to be well adapted but was dead at 15yrs.
  205. 205. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Sambucus canadensis American elder (214)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted but short-lived.  Growing in several locations, near the office.
  206. 206. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Symphoricarpus orbiculatus coralberry (71)  Origin-native  Several plants have become established naturally throughout Prairie Pines.
  207. 207. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum carlesii Koreanspice viburnum (147)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Noted for its fragrant flowers in May.  One plant grows northwest of office at the south edge of the driveway.  40.84382-96.56669  40.84372-96.56593  40.84434-96.56531
  208. 208. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum dentatum arrowwood viburnum (72)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  The first # below is south of the driveway to the old farm house.  40.84416-96.56725  40.84446-96.56503
  209. 209. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum xjuddii (66)  Origin-unknown  Danamere Nrsy.(1986) Des Moines Ia.  It is southeast of the tree house.  40.84434-96.56531
  210. 210. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum lantana wayfaring tree (73)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  The plant illustrated has suffered die-back, reason unknown.  40.84457-96.56509
  211. 211. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum lentago nannyberry (5)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to the shaded site.  40.84441-96.56526
  212. 212. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum prunifolium blackhaw viburnum (92)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to site.  Several plants grow on Prairie Pines.  40.84416-96.56635  40.84285-96.56235
  213. 213. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Viburnum trilobum American cranberrybush (35, 3)  Origin-unknown  Well adapted to this site.  Reseeds prolifically with the assistance of birds.  One specimen adjacent to N.E. corner of office.  40.84354-96.56627  40.84321-96.56701  40.84476-96.56504  40.84416-96.56553
  214. 214. Caprifoliaceae – honeysuckle family Weigala roseum weigala (9)  Origin-unknown  Obtained from NSA (1982).  Dead overtopped by faster growing trees.
  215. 215. Smilaceae – catbrier family Smilax hispida bristly greenbrier (274)  Origin-native  Well adapted to the area.  It grows among many of the trees on Prairie Pines.
  216. 216. Virginia’s Forest – Prairie Pines This planting was requested by Virginia as a place where she could relax. It is southeast of the office complex. 40.84311-96.56569

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