Unit 1: Inclusive Teaching EDUC 4501 Class 3
Group Time <ul><li>Make notes about information you encountered that was difficult to understand, inconsistent, possibly i...
Towards the Celebration of Difference People with Disabilities in School and Society
Goals <ul><li>Trace the movement towards inclusive education </li></ul><ul><li>Review presentation expectations </li></ul>
Changing approaches in education <ul><li>Exclusion  </li></ul><ul><li>Segregation </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreaming </li></u...
Manitoba History <ul><li>The Public Education Act stated that “every person between the ages of 6 and 21 shall have the ri...
“ Where the board of a school district have reason to believe that a person attending a school of the district is a mental...
Denied public education <ul><li>Manitoba Day School for the Deaf </li></ul><ul><li>Brantford School for the Blind </li></u...
Parents begin schools <ul><li>Volunteer, parent support organizations began to operate schools in 1955 </li></ul><ul><li>B...
Public responsibility <ul><li>Bill 16 passed in 1965, mandated public responsibility for all school age children by July 1...
Segregation <ul><li>School divisions took over parent run schools </li></ul><ul><li>By 1970, most school divisions were op...
Influencing factors <ul><li>Abuse in institutions exposed </li></ul><ul><li>Civil rights movement </li></ul><ul><li>Wolfen...
Mainstreaming <ul><li>Term for placing students with disabilities in regular classrooms when they can meet the traditional...
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms <ul><li>Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to eq...
Special Education Review  <ul><li>Conducted over 3 years </li></ul><ul><li>Report published in 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>44 r...
Philosophy of Inclusion <ul><li>Inclusion is a way of thinking and acting that allows every individual to feel accepted, v...
<ul><li>Through recognition and support, an inclusive community provides meaningful involvement and equal access to the be...
What does this mean? <ul><li>Students with special needs should experience school as much as possible like their peers wit...
<ul><li>Foster school and classroom communities where all students, including those with diverse needs and abilities, have...
Teachers can make a difference <ul><li>We have the power to create classrooms where difference is celebrated, embraced, an...
Presentations <ul><li>Sept 29 </li></ul><ul><li>Andrew </li></ul><ul><li>Darren </li></ul><ul><li>Francine </li></ul><ul><...
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Historical Perspectives

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Historical Perspectives

  1. 1. Unit 1: Inclusive Teaching EDUC 4501 Class 3
  2. 2. Group Time <ul><li>Make notes about information you encountered that was difficult to understand, inconsistent, possibly inaccurate, or biased </li></ul>
  3. 3. Towards the Celebration of Difference People with Disabilities in School and Society
  4. 4. Goals <ul><li>Trace the movement towards inclusive education </li></ul><ul><li>Review presentation expectations </li></ul>
  5. 5. Changing approaches in education <ul><li>Exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Segregation </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreaming </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusion </li></ul>
  6. 6. Manitoba History <ul><li>The Public Education Act stated that “every person between the ages of 6 and 21 shall have the right to attend school” Section 237(2) </li></ul><ul><li>Section 291 provided this caveat - </li></ul>
  7. 7. “ Where the board of a school district have reason to believe that a person attending a school of the district is a mental defective within the meaning of the Mental Deficiency Act , it may, by resolution prohibit that person from attending or entering the school, and that person shall not be entitled to attend or enter any school of the district until he presents to the board a certificate from two physicians, or from the medical superintendent of the psychopathic ward as defined in the Mental Diseases Act that he is not a mental defective.”
  8. 8. Denied public education <ul><li>Manitoba Day School for the Deaf </li></ul><ul><li>Brantford School for the Blind </li></ul><ul><li>Manitoba School for Retardates </li></ul><ul><li>St. Amant Centre </li></ul>
  9. 9. Parents begin schools <ul><li>Volunteer, parent support organizations began to operate schools in 1955 </li></ul><ul><li>Built the Kinsmen School in 1957 </li></ul><ul><li>316 students enrolled by 1964 </li></ul>
  10. 10. Public responsibility <ul><li>Bill 16 passed in 1965, mandated public responsibility for all school age children by July 1, 1967 </li></ul><ul><li>Section 291 excluding individuals who were “mental defectives” was repealed </li></ul>
  11. 11. Segregation <ul><li>School divisions took over parent run schools </li></ul><ul><li>By 1970, most school divisions were operating special schools or at least a number of special classes </li></ul>
  12. 12. Influencing factors <ul><li>Abuse in institutions exposed </li></ul><ul><li>Civil rights movement </li></ul><ul><li>Wolfensberger: principle of normalization </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. legislation </li></ul>
  13. 13. Mainstreaming <ul><li>Term for placing students with disabilities in regular classrooms when they can meet the traditional academic expectations with minimal assistance, or when those expectations are not relevant </li></ul>
  14. 14. Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms <ul><li>Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age, or mental or physical disability. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Special Education Review <ul><li>Conducted over 3 years </li></ul><ul><li>Report published in 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>44 recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Need for consistency with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms </li></ul>
  16. 16. Philosophy of Inclusion <ul><li>Inclusion is a way of thinking and acting that allows every individual to feel accepted, valued, and safe. An inclusive community consciously evolves to meet the changing needs of its members. </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Through recognition and support, an inclusive community provides meaningful involvement and equal access to the benefits of citizenship. </li></ul><ul><li>In Manitoba, we embrace inclusion as a means of enhancing the well-being of every member of the community. By working together, we strengthen our capacity to provide the foundation for a richer future for all of us. </li></ul>
  18. 18. What does this mean? <ul><li>Students with special needs should experience school as much as possible like their peers without special needs. </li></ul><ul><li>To make inclusion applicable in Manitoba schools, educators will: </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Foster school and classroom communities where all students, including those with diverse needs and abilities, have a sense of personal belonging and achievement. </li></ul><ul><li>Engage in practices that allow students with a wide range of learning needs to be taught together effectively. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance students’ abilities to deal with diversity </li></ul>
  20. 20. Teachers can make a difference <ul><li>We have the power to create classrooms where difference is celebrated, embraced, and valued. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Presentations <ul><li>Sept 29 </li></ul><ul><li>Andrew </li></ul><ul><li>Darren </li></ul><ul><li>Francine </li></ul><ul><li>Thom </li></ul><ul><li>Oct 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Casey </li></ul><ul><li>Josh </li></ul><ul><li>Kent </li></ul>

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