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Digital Preservation in Practice: Case Study

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Presentation by Ed Pinsent for the Digital Preservation Coalition event Making Progress in Digital Preservation, 15/09/2015

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Digital Preservation in Practice: Case Study

  1. 1. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Digital Preservation in Practice: Case Study Ed Pinsent, ULCC
  2. 2. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk About me • Ed Pinsent, Digital Archivist at ULCC since 2004 • Teaches the DPTP • Offers consultancy in digital preservation • Background as archivist / records manager • Experience in web-archiving, repository management, metadata projects, migration, digitisation, project management etc. • See more at digital archives blog http://dart.blogs.ulcc.ac.uk/
  3. 3. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Plan • Case study for a digital preservation strategy • Based on consultancy work • Organisation cannot be named; designated as “Global Novelties Inc.”, a commercial business selling toys and novelties internationally • Their archivists wanted a digital preservation strategy for born-digital content
  4. 4. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk The Business Global Novelties Plastic toys Brands Customers
  5. 5. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk The “ToyBox” • Digital Asset Management System • Holds digital assets about novelties • Kept for legal and financial purpose • Expresses ownership of brands
  6. 6. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Archivists’ fear • ToyBox • May contain digital records and digital archives of the future • Seems to be “owned” by IT people • Our Digital Archive • How can we get the ToyBox contents in here? • That sounds expensive and difficult • IT people won’t talk to us
  7. 7. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Reasons to use the ToyBox - 1 • Owner of the system is in favour of it • Legal team support it • ToyBox is well-resourced • Has a dedicated funding stream from the Marketing wing • Has capacity on a grand scale • Access tightly managed; very secure • Does a form of “archiving” already (sort of…)
  8. 8. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk More reasons to use the ToyBox • Already in place… – Disaster plan – Database – Metadata extraction – Future storage needs – Authenticity checks of the objects – Checksum generation and validation – Workflows
  9. 9. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Caveats • ToyBox not purpose built for preservation – Would need modifications… • Archivist needs are not prioritised • Curation / cataloguing functionality not very “rich” • Language barrier with IT team • Won’t work for all archival materials in scope • Search limited (metadata limited)
  10. 10. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Make ToyBox your Digital Archive Exploit existing functionality Use their budget Start a project for developing features Devise workflows (Ingest, etc.) Draft your metadata needs Get fields added to database Secure partition for archival storage
  11. 11. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Lessons learned 1. Use / re-use / adapt existing systems 2. Align archival aims with business aims 3. Your “enemy” may be your best friend 4. Don’t always think of your archive as something “separate” 5. Work with IT people, find common ground
  12. 12. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Web presence Global Novelties Plastic toys Brands Customers Brand websites
  13. 13. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Make a business case for web archiving • Brand owners must be made aware of potential losses • Position the archive as crucial to business • Steps: – Survey internal stakeholders – Liaise with IT / brand managers / webmasters – Demonstrate value-add of web archive service
  14. 14. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk Lessons learned 1. Align archival aims with business aims 2. Speak to the stakeholders 3. Build preservation into the business spend 4. Don’t archive web indiscriminately; build use cases
  15. 15. @ulcc www.ulcc.ac.uk http://www.dptp.org e.pinsent@ulcc.ac.uk stephanie.taylor@ulcc.ac.uk

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