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UKSG webinar: COUNTER for Publishers with Stuart Maxwell, Scholarly iQ and Lorraine Estelle, COUNTER

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Join us for a comprehensive insight into COUNTER and the COUNTER Code of Practice including:

What is COUNTER?
Why COUNTER is important to library customers
Why COUNTER is important to publishers
How to become COUNTER compliant and the COUNTER Code of Practice
COUNTER reports for books, journals and databases

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UKSG webinar: COUNTER for Publishers with Stuart Maxwell, Scholarly iQ and Lorraine Estelle, COUNTER

  1. 1. COUNTER/UKSG webinar COUNTER FOR PUBLISHERS Lorraine Estelle, COUNTER Stuart Maxwell, Scholarly iQ
  2. 2. What is COUNTER COUNTER provides the standard that enables the knowledge community to count the use of electronic resources. Known as the Code of Practice, the standard ensures vendors and publishers can provide their library customers with: Consistent, Credible and Comparable Usage Data
  3. 3. Why have a Standard? Not all measurements are equal, even with the same tool A simple web page includes many files or hits which are also effected by bots and spiders
  4. 4. Why have a Standard? User behaviour tends toward making multiple clicks for a single content request, whether by instinct or impatience Librarians have a lot of subscriptions to evaluate and a lot of reports to consolidate
  5. 5. COUNTER is important to your library customers • The COUNTER standard was developed to provide a service to librarians who purchase subscriptions to publishers’ content • The reports allow librarians to easily compare their usage across different publishers’ content • To use that information to calculate a cost-per-download and review the value gained from their subscriptions • To have access denials reported and see what further subscriptions are/ might be of value to users
  6. 6. Scenario • Camford purchase two subscriptions for 2015: Journal X for £25,000 and Journal Y for £10,000 • At the end of the year Camford’s librarian (Barbara) runs a COUNTER JR1 report to check the usage. Journal X is showing 60,000 views and downloads, compared with just 200 for Journal Y. • Barbara therefore tells her Head Librarian that while Journal X is more expensive, it has a better cost-per-download... the calculation looks like this: • Journal X: £25,000 / 60,000 = £0.42 per use • Barbara has 1,000s of subscriptions to evaluate/ 200 = oose a journal to cancel, it’s likely to be Journal Y.
  7. 7. Why COUNTER is important to publishers Most major vendors and publishers also use COUNTER reports to: • Provide reliable and comparable usage data to their library customers • To demonstrate the reach of the research they publish to Authors, Funding Bodies and Societies • Upsell using COUNTER data about access denied as the result of a content item not being licensed or because concurrent/simultaneous user licence limits were exceeded. • COUNTER reports and compliant data are also increasingly being used by publishers as a trusted internal measurement criteria, analysing usage across their client base and providing internal insight and decision making, and reporting to other stakeholders
  8. 8. Scenario • A publisher publishes and sells subscriptions for 10 online titles • The publisher has 500 subscribers wanting reporting of usage to understand the value of their subscription • The publisher runs trial accounts for prospective customers • The publisher has content hosted on 2 different platforms/providers and needs to consolidate across these
  9. 9. Scenario • The publisher has internal stakeholders wanting to answer questions such as: • Editorial – how is content performing and what topics/new content will drive engagement? • Sales – how are trial accounts performing? • Marketing – which campaigns/strategies are driving usage for targeted customers or products? • Product development – what changes or new features will give us the best returns with increased engagement and customer retention? • Technical – what should I be asking my platform provider to prioritise to deliver to my users needs? • Management – how is our business performing? what are our challenges? what are our opportunities?
  10. 10. Scenario • The publisher has additional external stakeholders to report to such as: • Authors – content performance, royalty reporting, user interests, publisher selection • Funding bodies – content performance, publisher selection, cost per download, user interests • Partner societies – content performance, partner selection, royalties/revenue, user/member interests • Investors – business performance and governance
  11. 11. COUNTER Principles • Consistent, Credible and Comparable Usage Data • Removal of invalid users, bots, spiders etc • Filtering of double-clicks, last click counted • 10 seconds for html • 30 seconds for PDF • Standardised layouts and formats of reports • Self access to reports for librarians • SUSHI harvesting • Independent 3rd party audit
  12. 12. COUNTER reports
  13. 13. Book reports There are five ‘standard’ book reports in COUNTER release 4, and a newly released optional report BR7. Here is the detail on two of them
  14. 14. Book Report 1 ‘number of successful title requests by month and by title’ Included Excluded Whole books Book parts (chapters) Journal article metadata Journal article lists (e.g. issue contents) Journal article full-text Multimedia Supplementary files Databases Searches Search result clicks
  15. 15. How the data is tracked • When a user requests a page which displays or downloads a complete book in any file type, the publisher’s reporting database will record that page view for use in BR1 • The usage will be shown in the columns for Reporting Period Total and the relevant calendar month.
  16. 16. What you’ll see and what it means
  17. 17. Book Report 2 ‘number of successful section requests by month and by title’ Included Excluded Book parts (chapters) Books Journal article metadata Journal article lists (e.g. issue contents) Journal article full-text Multimedia Supplementary files Databases Searches Search result clicks
  18. 18. How the data is tracked • When a user requests a page which displays full-text HTML for a book part (chapter), the publisher’s reporting database will record that page view for use in BR2 • When a user downloads a full-text PDF for a book part (chapter), the publisher’s reporting database will record that download for use in BR2 • When a user views or downloads a book part full-text file in any format other than HTML or PDF, the publisher’s database will record that download for use in BR2
  19. 19. What you’ll see and what it means
  20. 20. Journal Reports There is a combination of ‘standard’ and ‘optional’ journal reports in COUNTER release 4. Here is the detail on two of them
  21. 21. Journal Report 1 ‘number of successful full-text article requests by month and by journal’ Included Excluded Journal article full text Journal article metadata Journal article lists (e.g. issue contents) Multimedia Supplementary files Books Book parts (chapters) Databases Searches Search result clicks
  22. 22. How the data is tracked • When a user requests a page which displays full-text HTML for a journal article, the publisher’s reporting database will record that page view for use in JR1. • When a user downloads a full-text PDF for a journal article, the publisher’s reporting database will record that download for use in JR1. • When a user views or downloads a full-text file in any format other than HTML or PDF, the publisher’s database will record that download for use in JR1.
  23. 23. What you’ll see and what it means
  24. 24. Journal Report 2 ‘access denied to full-text articles by month, journal and category’ Included Excluded Journal article full text Journal article metadata Journal article lists (e.g. issue contents) Multimedia Supplementary files Books Book parts (chapters) Databases Searches Search result clicks
  25. 25. How the data is tracked • When a user who does not have a licence attempts to land on a page which displays full-text HTML for a journal article, they will be redirected to the article metadata view and the publisher’s reporting database will record an access denial for use in JR2 • When a user who does not have a licence attempts to download a full-text PDF for a journal article, they will be redirected to the article metadata view and the publisher’s reporting database will record an access denial for use in JR2 • Double-clicks are also filtered to prevent inflated reporting of access denials
  26. 26. What you’ll see and what it means
  27. 27. Database Reports There are three ‘standard’ database reports in COUNTER release 4. Here is the detail on one of them
  28. 28. Database Report 1 ‘total searches, result clicks and record views by month and database’ Included Excluded Manual searches Automated (pre-canned) searches Search result clicks Metadata views Databases Journal article full-text Journal article metadata Journal article lists (e.g. issue contents) Multimedia Supplementary files Books Book parts (chapters)
  29. 29. How the data is tracked • When a user types a search term into the platform search box, a ‘regular search’ is recorded for use in DB1 • ‘Searches – federated and automated’ refers to usage such as search- engine crawling, as well as federated searches • When a user clicks on a result for a given database from the result list displayed by a search or browse action, a ‘result click’ is recorded for use in DB1 • When a user views the detailed metadata for a record in the database, a ‘record view’ is recorded for use in DB1. Record views are recorded whether the user has come from an internal search or browse, or an external link. Record views do not have to be views of the full-text.
  30. 30. What you’ll see and what it means
  31. 31. SUSHI
  32. 32. What is SUSHI? • SUSHI - XML based automated request and response model for harvesting usage data across a variety of usage reports and sources • Developed by NISO (National Information Standards Organizations) in cooperation with COUNTER • A requirement for COUNTER compliance • Enables librarians to automatically harvest COUNTER compliance usage reports from multiple publishers directly into their chosen ERM tool, making the harvesting and aggregating of usage reports much less time consuming for the librarian or library consortium administrator • Several SUSHI client tools are currently available through various vendors
  33. 33. Becoming COUNTER Compliant
  34. 34. COUNTER Principles • Consistent, Credible and Comparable Usage Data • Removal of invalid users, bots, spiders etc • Filtering of double-clicks, last click counted • 10 seconds for html • 30 seconds for PDF • Standardised layouts and formats of reports • Self access to reports for librarians • SUSHI harvesting • Independent 3rd party audit
  35. 35. How do I become COUNTER Compliant? 1. Prepare your COUNTER-compliant reports 2. Enable SUSHI 3. Send your reports to COUNTER 4. Complete the paperwork 5. Undergo an independent audit http://www.projectcounter.org/guides/Friendly.pdf http://www.projectcounter.org/guides/Technical.pdf
  36. 36. How do Librarians know a publisher/vendor is compliant COUNTER will list you on its website - www.projectcounter.org You can use the COUNTER logo on your website and other materials
  37. 37. How you can get involved with COUNTER • Not yet compliant? Contact COUNTER for guidance - lorraine.estelle@counterusage.org • Already compliant – Become a member of COUNTER! Access guides and receive updates www.projectcounter.org • Members are eligible for nomination to COUNTER’s working groups and committees – they include libraries, consortia, vendors and industry organisations, and they shape the standard!
  38. 38. Questions Lorraine Estelle, Director, COUNTER Lorraine.estelle@counterusage.org Stuart Maxwell, VP of Business Development, Scholarly iQ Stuart.maxwell@scholarlyiq.com

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