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UKSG Conference 2017 Breakout - Evaluation of PDA and EBS models for e-books at Stockholm University Library - Frida Jacobson

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As a means of making available and acquiring e-books,
Stockholm University Library uses PDA and EBS models.
In order to improve the knowledge of the benefits and
drawbacks of these purchasing models, the library has
undertaken a major evaluation of ten agreements with
various publishers and aggregators. This session will, among
other things, address the following questions: What is the
average price per book at the time of purchase? What is the
cost per use? Do purchased titles continue to be used? What
is the usage by subject area and by year of publication?

Published in: Education
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UKSG Conference 2017 Breakout - Evaluation of PDA and EBS models for e-books at Stockholm University Library - Frida Jacobson

  1. 1. Evaluation of PDA and EBS models for e-books at Stockholm University Library UKSG 40th Annual Conference April 2017, Harrogate 2017-04-10 /Frida Jacobson, Stockholm University Library
  2. 2. Agenda ● Stockholm University and the University Library ● Patron-driven acquisition strategy ● PDA and EBS models ● Evaluation ● Findings ● Conclusions
  3. 3. Stockholm University ● Founded in 1878 – a free and radical college ● One of the largest universities in Sweden ● Science, Humanities and Social Sciences ● 70,000 students (28,000 FTE, 63% women) – 12% Science, 88% HSS ● 1,700 doctoral students (50% women) – 47% Science, 53% HSS ● 5,000 employees – 450 professors (30% women)
  4. 4. Stockholm University Library ● Number of employees – 115 (librarians, IT and economy staff, HR) ● Media acquisition budget – approx. 4,8 million EUR (46 million SEK) – 94 % e-resources, 6 % print ● Ebooks – Access to approx. 800,000 e-books
  5. 5. Strategy for Stockholm University Library’s patron-driven acquisiton ● Providing users with quick access to requested media resources – anytime and anywhere ● From just-in-case to just-in-time acquisition model ● Users drive acquisition through – purchase suggestions – usage – PDA/EBS models
  6. 6. PDA and EBS models ● Upfront payment to a publisher or aggregator ● Access to a large number of unowned e-books ● Accessible via library catalogue and e-book platform ● Access for a certain period of time, often a year ● The most used ebooks are purchased and owned – with help of ’triggers’ or usage statistics ● Only e-books with proven usage are purchased ● Core idea – purchased e-books will continue to be used
  7. 7. Evaluation Description and experiences o Content o Pricing model o Accessibility o Work input o Support Cost and usage analysis o Cost o Usage
  8. 8. Cost and usage analysis ● What is the average price per book at the time of purchase? ● What is the cost per download? ● How great a proportion of the titles is used? ● How great a proportion of the titles is purchased? ● Do purchased titles continue to be used? ● Usage by subject area? ● Usage by year of publication?
  9. 9. Method – cost and usage analysis Yr 3Yr 2Yr 1Selection period
  10. 10. PDA and EBS models from 2 aggregators and 8 publishers were tested Publisher / Aggregator Number of titles Academic Video Online 43,000 (videos) Brill* 4,600 Cambridge University Press 30,000 De Gruyter 33,000 Ebrary (aggregator) 140,500 EBSCO (aggregator) 60,000 Oxford Scholarship Online 11,600 Palgrave* 3,700 Wiley 18,000 Taylor and Francis: CRCnetBASE 9,400 *Less titles since SUB already owns subject collections from these publishers 310 800 e-books in total
  11. 11. The vendors’ average price per e- book varied Publisher/aggregator Average price per title EUR Publisher A (videos) 14 Publisher B period 1-2 103 Publisher B period 3 100 Publisher C period 1-4 107 Publisher C period 5 132 Publisher D 178 Publisher E period 1 192 Publisher E period 2 160 Publisher E period 3 129 Aggregator A 87 Aggregator B 278 Publisher F 177 Publisher G 99 Publisher H period 1 89 Publisher H period 2 79 Publisher H period 3 111 Publisher H period 4 118 Average price per title all models 127
  12. 12. Cost per download after purchase falls Publisher / aggregator 1 yr after purch. EUR 2 yrs after purch. EUR 3 yr after purch. EUR 4 yrs after purch. EUR Publisher A (videos) 880 Publisher B 119 Publisher C period 1 19 10 7 5 Publisher C period 2 22 12 8 Publisher C period 3 12 7 Publisher D 73 Publisher E period 1 49 25 Publisher E period 2 27 Aggregator A 1 1 Aggregator B 69 Publisher F 9 Publisher G 8 Publisher H period 1 7 3 2 Publisher H period 2 10 5
  13. 13. ( YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 19 10 7 5Publisher C Period 1 27 3Publisher H Period 1 Cost per download falls (EUR)
  14. 14. Proportion of used titles and purchased titles differ Publisher Proportion of used titlesProportion of purch. titles Publisher A (videos) 1% 15% Publisher B period 1-2 23% 9% Publisher B period 3 12% 4% Publisher C period 1 15% 11% Publisher C period 2 14% 6% Publisher C period 3 14% 6% Publisher C period 4 16% 7% Publisher C period 5 19% 5% Publisher D 10% 12% Publisher E period 1 3% 2% Publisher E period 2 5% 1% Publisher E period 3 9% 1% Publisher F 14% 2% Publisher G 29% 9% Publisher H period 1 18% 5% Publisher H period 2 17% 6% Publisher H period 3 13% 4% Publisher H period 4 16% 5%
  15. 15. USED % PURCHASED % 1 15 Publisher A 12 10 Publisher D Publisher H period 1 18 5 Publisher C period 1 15 11 Usage vs purchase – two examples
  16. 16. Purchased titles continued to be used Publisher /aggregator Proportion of used titles yr 1 Proportion of used titles yr 2 Proportion of used titles yr 3 Proportion of used titles yr 4 Proportion of used title yr 5 Publisher A (videos) 1% Publisher B period 1-2 34% Publisher C period 1 38% 51% 60% 67% 71% Publisher C period 2 30% 46% 55% 61% Publisher C period 3 42% 56% 64% Publisher C period 4 38% 53% Publisher D 21% Publisher E period 1 34% 48% Publisher period 2 38% Aggregator A 68% 61% Aggregator B 35% Publisher F period 1 59% Publisher G 63% Publisher H period 1 54% 69% 75% Publisher H period 2 53% 69% Publisher H period 3 26%
  17. 17. YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5 Proportion of used titles in % 7138 Publisher C period 1 51 60 67 Publisher H period 1 54 69 75
  18. 18. Humanities and social science were popular subject areas Linguistics and Semiotics 47% Literary Studies 16% Law 7% Philosophy 10% Classical Studies… Social Sciences 3% Theology and Religions Studies 6% History 2% Architecture, Art, Music 2% Mathematics 1% Library & Information Science… Other 1% de Gruyter: used titles by subject – period 1
  19. 19. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Social & Behavioral Sciences (42 titles) Humanities (78 titles) Mathematics & Statistics (176 titles) Business, Economics, Finance & Accounting (46 titles) Life Sciences (28 titles) Medicine (11 titles) Various subjects (25 titles) Psychology (26 titles) Earth, Space & Environmental Sciences (33 titles) Computer Science & Information Technology (14 titles) Chemistry (153 titles) Physical Sciences & Engineering (105 titles) Agriculture, Aquaculture & Food Science (11 titles) 90% 91% 82% 70% 61% 27% 64% 69% 58% 50% 55% 44% 36% 7% 1% 6% 7% 14% 45% 8% 0% 9% 14% 8% 12% 9% 2% 8% 11% 24% 25% 27% 28% 31% 33% 36% 37% 44% 55% Wiley: Usage per subject 3 years after purchase (748 titles) Titles used more than once Titles used only once Titles without usage
  20. 20. Usage stats indicates new interesting subject areas Asian Studies 23% Biblical Studies 20% Social Sciences 11% History 11% International Law 10% Middle East & Islamic Studies 9% Language & Linguistics 8% Human Rights & Humanitarian Law 3% Classical Studies 3% Biology 2% Materials & Surface Science 0% Brill: used titles – by subject
  21. 21. The most recently published titles have been used the most 1990-2006 1% 2007-2009 11% 2010-2012 44% 2013-2015 44% de Gruyter: used titles by year of publication – period 3
  22. 22. Summary cost and usage analysis ● The vendors’ average price per e-book varied ● Cost per download falls over the years ● Purchased titles continued to be used ● Social sciences and humanities were popular subject areas ● Recently published titles have been used the most ● Collected statistics are useful for future subject collections purchases ● Two EBS models were not successful regarding cost and usage
  23. 23. ● One large publisher ● Less titles ● Access to all content, no STL* ● Purchase based on usage stats ● No DRM**-restrictions ● Unlimited number of users ● Less labour intensive ● Control over the money invested PDA from aggregators EBS from publishers *STL=Short Term Loan, *DRM=Digital Rights Managements ● Many different publishers ● Large number of titles ● Selection profiles, STL* ● ”Triggers” lead to purchase ● DRM** ● Limited number of users ● Labour intensive ● Invested money spent fast
  24. 24. Next steps ● Update the 2016 figures for all agreements – titles continued to be used – per year and subject area ● Perform a usage analysis of traditionally purchased e-book packages ● Test more EBS models from publishers ● When deselect a successful EBS model where we own a large part of the content on the platform? ● If not continue with EBS – what would then be the alternatives?
  25. 25. Any questions? Thank you for your attention. Contact: frida.jacobson@sub.su.se 2017-04-10 /Frida Jacobson, Stockholm University Library

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