Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

UKSG Conference 2016 Breakout Session - The Predatory Publishing Phenomenon: actors, bystanders, consequences, Regina Romano Reynolds

807 views

Published on

What is meant by ‘predatory publisher’? Who is preyed on and by whom? What are the consequences of this publishing phenomenon? The Director of the US ISSN Center will draw on the experience of the ISSN Network and National Library of Medicine (NLM) to explore these issues. Criteria for inclusion in NLM’s indexes and the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), as well as criteria for denying or revoking an ISSN, will be outlined. Statistics on the ubiquity and longevity of these publications, their impact on ISSN and NLM, and the role of librarians will be discussed.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

UKSG Conference 2016 Breakout Session - The Predatory Publishing Phenomenon: actors, bystanders, consequences, Regina Romano Reynolds

  1. 1. REGINA ROMANO REYNOLDS DIRECTOR, U.S. ISSN CENTER LIBRARY OF CONGRESS UKSG, BOURNEMOUTH, 2016
  2. 2. BEALL’S DEFINITION “predatory” publishers—those that unprofessionally exploit the gold open-access model for their own profit. These publishers use deception to appear legitimate, entrapping researchers into submitting their work and then charging them to publish it. J. Beall, The Scientist Aug 1, 2012
  3. 3. PREDATORY PRACTICES DESCRIBED BY BEALL* • Attracting revenue by deceiving their authors, their readers, and/or those trying to evaluate the scholarly achievements of their authors. • Honesty (does it falsely claim editorial board members or impact factors?) • Business practices (does it engage in spam solicitations or steal content from reputable journals?), and • Transparency (does it hide author charges until after manuscript acceptance or hide its content from search engines?). https://www.ufv.ca/media/assets/research/workshops/Criteria- for-Determining-Predatory-Publishers.pdf
  4. 4. WHO ARE THE PREDATORS?
  5. 5. PREDATORS? • Beall’s list? —controversial • Many publishers, open access or not? • Large commercial and society publishers? • Academics who edit predatory journals or serve on their boards? • Academia’s“publish or perish” requirement? • Authors knowingly publishing in journals that have names similar to well known journals? • Publishers who employ deceptive practices solely to reap profits?
  6. 6. WHO IS BEING PREYED ON?
  7. 7. PREY? Authors? Scholars in Developin g Libraries? The Public?
  8. 8. THE DARK SIDE OF OPEN ACCESS: TRUE TALES FROM THE U.S. ISSN CENTER
  9. 9. GOOGLE MAPS PHOTO: LOCATION OF A PUBLISHING OFFICE GIVEN BY PUBLISHER TO NLM
  10. 10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVE PREDATORY OPEN ACCESS JOURNALS FROM 2010-2014 Shen and Bjork, BMC Medicine (2015) 13:230
  11. 11. LONGEVITY?
  12. 12. LONGEVITY OBSERVATIONS (INFORMAL STUDIES BY KAREN ROSS, PROQUEST METADATA LIBRARIAN IN THE U.S. ISSN CENTER) • 77 journals from Beall’s list (from 22 publishers chosen at random) were checked for continued existence (start dates between 2007 – 2015) • 50 were still in existence although some had changed titles • Many of their earliest issues had fewer than 5 articles; • Now most had 10 – 12 articles per issue • Beall’s list of ca 900 titles was checked to determine if the publisher URL was still in existence • 145 had non-working URLs, with perhaps 15 of those changed URLs • Ca. 14% of the web sites could not be found Informal conclusion: Far from disappearing as some might have thought, questionable publishers and their journals are largely persisting
  13. 13. SHOULD WE RETIRE THE TERM? RICK ANDERSON Acting in bad faith? Questionable Publisher?
  14. 14. IT’S NOT SIMPLY “GOOD GUYS” VS. “BAD GUYS”
  15. 15. CONTINUUM Clueless Amateur Deceptive Fraudulent
  16. 16. IT’S COMPLICATED!
  17. 17. ACTORS: ENABLERS, BYSTANDERS, IMPROVERS? Academic s Peer reviewers Traditional publishers Governments ISSN centers Libraries & librarians Professiona l organization s
  18. 18. ECONOMIC REALITIES Ease of Internet publishing Government mandates for open access Growing numbers of scholars worldwide Library support for open access Requirement in developing countries to publish in “international journals” Selectivity by mainstream publishers
  19. 19. Growing numbers of authors + pressure to publish + ease of online publishing = marketing opportunity publishing opportunity
  20. 20. A moral panic is a feeling of fear spread among a large number of people that some evil threatens the well-being of society. A Dictionary of Sociology defines a moral panic as "the process of arousing social concern over an issue – usually the work of moral entrepreneurs and the mass media. Wikipedia
  21. 21. JOHN DUPUIS (CONFESSIONS OF A SCIENCE LIBRARIAN) • Is the “moral panic” over “predatory publishing” overshadowing the failings of peer review and the subscription model? • Retraction Watch examples • Should peer review be abolished? • Should journals be abolished in favor of something like physics preprints?
  22. 22. MIGHT THE BLANKET LABEL “PREDATORY:” HARM THE CAUSE OF OPEN ACCESS? INHIBIT PUBLISHING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES? DEPRIVE SCIENCE AND SCHOLARSHIP OF DISCOVERIES AND INSIGHTS?
  23. 23. HOW CAN QUALITY OPEN ACCESS PREVAIL?
  24. 24. SOME DOAJ BASIC REQUIREMENTS URL must go straight to the journal home page All content free without delays or embargos “Business information pages” available at journals’ URL, not a central page Journal must have a dedicated web site At least one ISSN Home page must “demonstrate that care has been taken to ensure high ethical and professional standards.” (Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing) Editor and editorial board with contact information Clear description of quality control system (editorial or peer review) All publishing charges clearly stated Open access policy clearly stated
  25. 25. PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPARENCY AND BEST PRACTICE IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING • Based on DOAJ requirements with some additions: • Responsibility to identify and prevent papers giving evidence of research misconduct • Journal name should be unique and not misleading or easily confused with another journals • Solicitation of manuscripts should be appropriate, well targeted and unobtrusive • Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) • Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) • Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) • World Association of Medical Editors (WAME)
  26. 26. ROLE OF THE LIBRARIAN
  27. 27. A TALE OF TWO LIBRARIES: LC ISSN AND NLM
  28. 28. ISSN APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS FROM ISSN.ORG d) We reserve the right to refuse an ISSN assignment if it is considered that misleading information has been provided by the requestor or printed/displayed on the publication regarding, for instance: the place of publication (publisher’s address), the members of the editorial board, the referencing by indexing services or databases, the participation in digital preservation programs or the authorship of the articles provided. e) We also reserve the right to revoke an ISSN if it subsequently comes to light that misleading information has been provided.
  29. 29. WHY ASSIGN ISSN AT ALL? • ISSN is first and foremost an identifier—these publications need to be identified and distinguished from same or similar titles • ISSN does not indicate quality or legitimacy any more than your social security number indicates that you are a good citizen • ISSN helps to track these publications and see patterns, such as what has been presented about longevity and ubiquity
  30. 30. U.S. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE EXCERPTS FROM COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT STATEMENT A journal should demonstrate: quality of editorial work the publisher and/or sponsoring organization’s history and corporate structure longevity record of performance regarding such issues as:  quality of publications,  experience in scholarly publishing,  involvement with the scientific community;  disclosure of an adherence to print and online publication standards, promotion of editorial integrity and independence.
  31. 31. NLM STRIVES FOR “GEOGRAPHIC HETEROGENEITY” other periodicals—those that are not sources of original research—must be primarily biomedical in content to be considered for selection. The Library may make exceptions [for] geographic heterogeneity. For example, NLM may select basic science or social science journals from developing countries which often have little or no medical publishing per se.
  32. 32. ROLES ACADEMIA CAN PLAY? Raise awareness of predatory practices and low quality journals Assess publish or perish requirements Assess value of open access journals Evaluate journal quality vs. prestige Scrutinize journal service as editors or on editorial boards
  33. 33. Online publishing is also redefining traditional notions of academic prestige…. What this article describes as predatory journals may well in the future be seen as simply a natural part of the market. … A new era of due diligence is dawning for academics… Keith McNaught, Journal of Electronic Publishing Vol. 18, issue 3
  34. 34. IS PREDATORY PUBLISHING A NATURAL CONSEQUENCE OF OPEN ACCESS? IS SCI-HUB A CONSEQUENCE OF SUBSCRIPTION ONLY ACCESS? WHERE DOES THE FUTURE OF SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION LIE?
  35. 35. …the problems caused by predatory journals are rather limited and regional and believe that the publishing volumes in such journals will cease growing in the near future. Open access publishing is rapidly gaining momentum… this should create better opportunities for researchers from countries where predatory publishing is currently popular, to get published in journals of higher quality, in particular since most journals have a policy to waive APC’s for authors from developing countries. Shen and Bjork
  36. 36. TEMPORARY INCONVENIENCE; PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT?
  37. 37. Thank you! rrey@loc.gov
  38. 38. ARTICLES CITED Rick Anderson, “Should we Retire the Term, “Predatory Publishing?” The Scholarly Kitchen, May 11, 2015 J. Beall, “Predatory Publishing,” The Scientist, August 1, 2012 John Dupuis, “Some perspecitve on ‘predatory’ open access journals, Confessions of a Science Librarian, March 31, 2015 Keith McNaught, “The Changing Publication Practices in Academia: Inherent Users and Issues in Open Access and online Publishing and the Rise of Fraudulent Publications,” Journal of Electronic Publishing, Vol. 18, Issue 3: on Access, Summer 2015 Cenyu Shen and Bo-Christer Bjork, “Predatory” open access: a longitudinal study of article volumes and market characteristics,” BMC Medicine (2015) 13:230
  39. 39. RESOURCES Beall’s list : https://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ DOAJ: https://doaj.org/ ISSN International Centre: www.issn.org NL M: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/ Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association: http://oaspa.org/ Principles of Transparency: http://publicationethics.org/news/principles- transparency-and-best-practice-scholarly-publishing- revised-and-updated ROAD: http://road.issn.org Think Check Submit: http://thinkchecksubmit.org/

×