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Domain modelling Parliament

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Anya Somerville, Silver Oliver and Michael Smethurst on work to domain model the UK Parliament. Slides for Euro IA 2017

Transcript

  1. 1. Domain Driven Design at UK Parliament Euro IA 2017
  2. 2. Anya Somerville Head of Indexing and Data Management, UK Parliament Michael Smethurst Data Architect UK Parliament Silver Oliver Information Architect Data Language Introductions
  3. 3. What you will learn •What Parliament is •What problems we are trying to solve •How we are going about it •What the outcome has been to date
  4. 4. What is Government? •Is accountable to Parliament •Proposes new laws to Parliament •Runs public departments
  5. 5. What is Parliament? •Holds Government to account •Allows input from citizens •Debates issues to influence decision making
  6. 6. Erskine May
  7. 7. What is Parliament?
  8. 8. The challenge
  9. 9. Don’t put your organisational structure on the web
  10. 10. Website for each office or project Over 50 different domains
  11. 11. How we are trying to solve it
  12. 12. Domain-driven design
  13. 13. What is domain modelling? •A creative collaboration •Drawing back at each other •Talking about things in a natural context
  14. 14. Why Domain-driven design?
  15. 15. Simple ComplicatedComplex Chaos Cynefin Dave Snowden, Cognitive Edge
  16. 16. Calendar Standing Orders Precedent Election Cynefin
  17. 17. If you don't address the messiness you build it into your system
  18. 18. Inquiry
  19. 19. Committee Inquiry Committee
  20. 20. Committee Inquiry
  21. 21. Committee Inquiry Committee Inquiry Committee Inquiry
  22. 22. IMPOSSIBLE: Very HARD: HARD: Quite HARD: Quite EASY: EASY: Fairly EASY: Business applications providing data Data platform Changing workflows/ job descriptions Union negotiations Data authoring tools Website THE EVENT HORIZON
  23. 23. How to do it
  24. 24. WHAT Bridge person 2-3 SME’s Finding people Environment Culture How wide to go? How deep to go? Probe familiar patterns Cardinality WHO HOW Anecdote Pens Whiteboard Social graph Domain modelling Trial and error Conversation
  25. 25. Facilitating not directing (from a script) •Congruence – without hiding behind a professional or personal facade. •Unconditional positive regard – demonstrating a willingness to attentively listen without interruption, judgement or giving advice. •Empathy – desire to understand and appreciate their participants perspective.
  26. 26. Parliament domain modelling
  27. 27. https://github.com/ukparliam ent/domain-models
  28. 28. https://beta.parliament.uk/houses/KL2k1BGP/members/current/a-z/a
  29. 29. https://beta.parliament.uk/people/7TX8ySd4
  30. 30. https://beta.parliament.uk/constituencies/x45XdVJD
  31. 31. See Also •Modeling Parliament(s?): https://pds.blog.parliament.uk/2016/09/09/modelling- parliaments/ •A routes file for the state: http://smethur.st/posts/176135861 • How we make websites: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/radiolabs/2009/01/how_we_make_websi tes.shtml • Cynefin for devs: https://lizkeogh.com/2012/03/11/cynefin- for-devs/ •Beyond the polar bear: https://www.slideshare.net/reduxd/beyond-the-polar-bear

Editor's Notes

  • we’re working together on a new website for Parliament
  • Read these, say how long we hope to take, and there’ll be time for questions at the end

  • To explain Parliament I need to explain what it isn’t:
    Parliament is not government
  • In the UK, Government
    Is accountable to Parliament
    Proposes new laws to Parliament
    Runs public departments (e.g. Home Office)

  • Parliament’s main functions are to
    hold government to account
    allows inputs from citizens
    debates current issues to influence government / wider society

  • It doesn’t really exist

    Parliament is not one thing: it’s three things. Two institutions and one person
    The House of Commons: the democratically elected house of Parliament.
    The House of Lords: the second chamber of Parliament, appointed members.
    The Queen is the Head of State: she opens Parliament every year & has to agree legislation

    Fact is they’re 2 different orgs; separate but interlinked. In reality it should look like this..

  • Leaving aside the queen…

    Two independent organisations - but interlinked
    There is no one person in charge

    Given there’s no such thing as Parliament…
    How does all this work?
    there are rules..
  • the written rules which regulate the proceedings of each House

    There are two sets of rules: two Houses do similar things, but in slightly different ways

    And things which are different might have the same name

    And the thing about the rules is they don’t cover everything
  • On top of the rules, there is precedent, or “custom and practice” - things that are permissible because they've been permitted in the past

    Much of parliamentary procedure has developed over the centuries, and aren’t written in the Standing Orders.

    This is Erskine May. Parliament’s Bible. it collects precedent

    So we have a fuzzy rule set: events test the rules, the organisation adapts, new processes emerge

    doesn’t end there though
  • And on top of rules and precedent there are people

    A lot of politics is about people: Things happen on stage and off stage

    It’s unpredictable

    Parliament is not special

    This - the rules + customs and practice + people is almost always true, of any organisation

  • Why can't a visual designer pick up user research and start designing and a dev start building an enterprise data model?
  • How do you overlay a website that makes sense to users over a organisation that doesn't make sense to its employees
  • Why can't a visual designer pick up user research and start designing and a dev start building an enterprise data model?
  • We are going to talk about one aspect of how we are trying to solve it through use of domain driven design
  • Drawing back at each other
    Unpacking the meaning of things by using it to describe what we do (talking about the domain from many perspectives)
    Prodding the domain from lots of different angles
    Eric Evans if you give someone a diagram they will agree with you. Get them to draw it and you see the difference. We redraw every time.
  • What it looks like
  • Simple are those practices any of us could understand
    Complicated are those things that are predictable but need expertise to get.
    Complex is a space is moving under you all you can do is learn by doing. This is where DM is critical to spend time talking in context about the things people do.
    Chaos is accident and emergency
    Best practice something we all likely do in a similar situation
    Good practice the expertise and rules specific to a team. Often written somewhere.
    Complex the co-evolved practices that have developed over time. Practitioners might not even be aware they do it.
    Chaos reaction
  • Member of parliaments calendar system looks like any other
    Standing orders are the rules of parliament.
    Precedent is the co-evolved practice of each office
  • Wrong model, mean clerks hack the system and we get bad data
  • Wrong model, mean clerks hack the system and we get bad data
  • Wrong model, mean clerks hack the system and we get bad data

  • Aligning domain understanding all the way through the business
    As we start to unpick the domain we see the solving the problem isn't simply a website thing. Spans back through the organisation.
  • Description

    Anya Somerville, Silver Oliver and Michael Smethurst on work to domain model the UK Parliament. Slides for Euro IA 2017

    Transcript

    1. 1. Domain Driven Design at UK Parliament Euro IA 2017
    2. 2. Anya Somerville Head of Indexing and Data Management, UK Parliament Michael Smethurst Data Architect UK Parliament Silver Oliver Information Architect Data Language Introductions
    3. 3. What you will learn •What Parliament is •What problems we are trying to solve •How we are going about it •What the outcome has been to date
    4. 4. What is Government? •Is accountable to Parliament •Proposes new laws to Parliament •Runs public departments
    5. 5. What is Parliament? •Holds Government to account •Allows input from citizens •Debates issues to influence decision making
    6. 6. Erskine May
    7. 7. What is Parliament?
    8. 8. The challenge
    9. 9. Don’t put your organisational structure on the web
    10. 10. Website for each office or project Over 50 different domains
    11. 11. How we are trying to solve it
    12. 12. Domain-driven design
    13. 13. What is domain modelling? •A creative collaboration •Drawing back at each other •Talking about things in a natural context
    14. 14. Why Domain-driven design?
    15. 15. Simple ComplicatedComplex Chaos Cynefin Dave Snowden, Cognitive Edge
    16. 16. Calendar Standing Orders Precedent Election Cynefin
    17. 17. If you don't address the messiness you build it into your system
    18. 18. Inquiry
    19. 19. Committee Inquiry Committee
    20. 20. Committee Inquiry
    21. 21. Committee Inquiry Committee Inquiry Committee Inquiry
    22. 22. IMPOSSIBLE: Very HARD: HARD: Quite HARD: Quite EASY: EASY: Fairly EASY: Business applications providing data Data platform Changing workflows/ job descriptions Union negotiations Data authoring tools Website THE EVENT HORIZON
    23. 23. How to do it
    24. 24. WHAT Bridge person 2-3 SME’s Finding people Environment Culture How wide to go? How deep to go? Probe familiar patterns Cardinality WHO HOW Anecdote Pens Whiteboard Social graph Domain modelling Trial and error Conversation
    25. 25. Facilitating not directing (from a script) •Congruence – without hiding behind a professional or personal facade. •Unconditional positive regard – demonstrating a willingness to attentively listen without interruption, judgement or giving advice. •Empathy – desire to understand and appreciate their participants perspective.
    26. 26. Parliament domain modelling
    27. 27. https://github.com/ukparliam ent/domain-models
    28. 28. https://beta.parliament.uk/houses/KL2k1BGP/members/current/a-z/a
    29. 29. https://beta.parliament.uk/people/7TX8ySd4
    30. 30. https://beta.parliament.uk/constituencies/x45XdVJD
    31. 31. See Also •Modeling Parliament(s?): https://pds.blog.parliament.uk/2016/09/09/modelling- parliaments/ •A routes file for the state: http://smethur.st/posts/176135861 • How we make websites: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/radiolabs/2009/01/how_we_make_websi tes.shtml • Cynefin for devs: https://lizkeogh.com/2012/03/11/cynefin- for-devs/ •Beyond the polar bear: https://www.slideshare.net/reduxd/beyond-the-polar-bear

    Editor's Notes

  • we’re working together on a new website for Parliament
  • Read these, say how long we hope to take, and there’ll be time for questions at the end

  • To explain Parliament I need to explain what it isn’t:
    Parliament is not government
  • In the UK, Government
    Is accountable to Parliament
    Proposes new laws to Parliament
    Runs public departments (e.g. Home Office)

  • Parliament’s main functions are to
    hold government to account
    allows inputs from citizens
    debates current issues to influence government / wider society

  • It doesn’t really exist

    Parliament is not one thing: it’s three things. Two institutions and one person
    The House of Commons: the democratically elected house of Parliament.
    The House of Lords: the second chamber of Parliament, appointed members.
    The Queen is the Head of State: she opens Parliament every year & has to agree legislation

    Fact is they’re 2 different orgs; separate but interlinked. In reality it should look like this..

  • Leaving aside the queen…

    Two independent organisations - but interlinked
    There is no one person in charge

    Given there’s no such thing as Parliament…
    How does all this work?
    there are rules..
  • the written rules which regulate the proceedings of each House

    There are two sets of rules: two Houses do similar things, but in slightly different ways

    And things which are different might have the same name

    And the thing about the rules is they don’t cover everything
  • On top of the rules, there is precedent, or “custom and practice” - things that are permissible because they've been permitted in the past

    Much of parliamentary procedure has developed over the centuries, and aren’t written in the Standing Orders.

    This is Erskine May. Parliament’s Bible. it collects precedent

    So we have a fuzzy rule set: events test the rules, the organisation adapts, new processes emerge

    doesn’t end there though
  • And on top of rules and precedent there are people

    A lot of politics is about people: Things happen on stage and off stage

    It’s unpredictable

    Parliament is not special

    This - the rules + customs and practice + people is almost always true, of any organisation

  • Why can't a visual designer pick up user research and start designing and a dev start building an enterprise data model?
  • How do you overlay a website that makes sense to users over a organisation that doesn't make sense to its employees
  • Why can't a visual designer pick up user research and start designing and a dev start building an enterprise data model?
  • We are going to talk about one aspect of how we are trying to solve it through use of domain driven design
  • Drawing back at each other
    Unpacking the meaning of things by using it to describe what we do (talking about the domain from many perspectives)
    Prodding the domain from lots of different angles
    Eric Evans if you give someone a diagram they will agree with you. Get them to draw it and you see the difference. We redraw every time.
  • What it looks like
  • Simple are those practices any of us could understand
    Complicated are those things that are predictable but need expertise to get.
    Complex is a space is moving under you all you can do is learn by doing. This is where DM is critical to spend time talking in context about the things people do.
    Chaos is accident and emergency
    Best practice something we all likely do in a similar situation
    Good practice the expertise and rules specific to a team. Often written somewhere.
    Complex the co-evolved practices that have developed over time. Practitioners might not even be aware they do it.
    Chaos reaction
  • Member of parliaments calendar system looks like any other
    Standing orders are the rules of parliament.
    Precedent is the co-evolved practice of each office
  • Wrong model, mean clerks hack the system and we get bad data
  • Wrong model, mean clerks hack the system and we get bad data
  • Wrong model, mean clerks hack the system and we get bad data

  • Aligning domain understanding all the way through the business
    As we start to unpick the domain we see the solving the problem isn't simply a website thing. Spans back through the organisation.
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