Web2 UKOLN MLA Workshop

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An introduction to Web 2.0 given by Stephanie Taylor of UKOLN, based on an orginal presentation by Marieke Guy of UKOLN.

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  • Web2 UKOLN MLA Workshop

    1. 1. UKOLN is supported by: Wikis, Blogs and Web 2.0 Demystified Your Name Your Job Title/Position www.bath.ac.uk This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 licence (but note caveat)
    2. 2. A Brief Introduction…. <ul><li>I work for UKOLN, National centre of expertise in digital information management </li></ul><ul><li>Located at the University of Bath </li></ul><ul><li>Funded by JISC and MLA to advise UK HE and FE communities and the cultural heritage sector </li></ul><ul><li>I work on the Interoperability Focus team </li></ul><ul><li>Currently work as the Chair of the Institutional Web Management Workshop and on the JISC Standards Catalogue </li></ul><ul><li>Previous roles include QA Focus, SPP Project Manager, ePrints UK project manager, Public Library Focus work, NOF-digitise, Web Magazines </li></ul>
    3. 3. Workshop Programme <ul><li>Presentation: Wikis, Blogs and Web 2.0 Demystified </li></ul><ul><ul><li>20 minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Any feedback, questions, comments etc. </li></ul>Add URL of event page on UKOLN website here Add Delicious tag for event here
    4. 4. So…What is Web 2.0? <ul><li>Marketing term (derived from observing 'patterns') rather than technical standards - “an attitude not a technology” </li></ul>Web2MemeMap, Tim O’Reilly, 2005 <ul><li>Characteristics Of Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network as platform </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Always beta </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clean URIs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remix and mash-ups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Syndication (RSS) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Architecture of participation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs & Wikis </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social networking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social tagging (folksonomies) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trust and openness </li></ul></ul>
    5. 6. Blogs <ul><li>A blog is a Web log, online diary </li></ul><ul><li>Professionals are increasingly using blogs to describe what they are doing </li></ul><ul><li>A social phenomenon of the 21 st Century </li></ul><ul><li>Key characteristics are openess, collaboration and syndication </li></ul><ul><li>There is a need for cultural heritage professionals to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand blogging and related technologies (e.g. RSS, Technorati) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be able to find resources in the 'Bloggosphere' </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explore how to use blogs to support business functions (support users, staff & organisation) </li></ul></ul>
    6. 7. Reading Blogs <ul><li>There are lots of dedicated blog readers </li></ul><ul><li>You can sign up for RSS feeds to be alerted to changes </li></ul><ul><li>Try not to be distracted by adverts etc </li></ul>Web 2.0 Bloglines – a Web-based Blog reader. You are informed of changes since you last viewed the page. http://www.bloglines.com/myblogs BlogBridge – a desktop Blog reader. You are informed of changes since you last viewed the page.
    7. 8. Professional Blogs <ul><li>Lots of Individuals creating blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Phil Bradley’s, Peter Scotts, Technobiblio, Library Techtronics, Shifted Librarian, Free Range Librarian </li></ul><ul><li>Some subject specialist and medical blogs, moving more towards library teams </li></ul><ul><li>British Librarian Bloggers list </li></ul>Panlibus - http://blogs.talis.com/panlibus/ It’s All Good - http://scanblog.blogspot.com/ Shush! http://library.northampton.ac.uk/blog/ Spineless? http://hwlibrary.wordpress.com/
    8. 9. Using Blogs <ul><li>Blogs are very interconnected with each other (bloggers discuss other blog postings). </li></ul><ul><li>This can help to provide feedback; measure impact; engage in discussions; etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Web Monkey extension can give blog comments on your pages </li></ul><ul><li>Technorati can help find Blog articles, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>A search for “Oxford University Library Services” returns 32 hits, mainly student blogs </li></ul><ul><li>The comments field can allow you to engage in discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Time for you to establish a blog? </li></ul>
    9. 10. Blog Issues <ul><li>Can you have a corporate voice, do you want one? </li></ul><ul><li>What software will you use? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hosted vs self hosted? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Free vs cost? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open source vs propriatary? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Features? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Popular software includes Moveable Type , Wordpress, Typepad, Blogger, Blogware </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A huge number of blogs are not read and become deserted by their writers </li></ul><ul><li>Do you want all your thoughts to be accessible to all? What about an internal blog? </li></ul><ul><li>If you want to increase visibility the more postings the higher rating </li></ul>
    10. 11. Wikis <ul><li>Wikis are collaborative Web-based authoring tools –read state and write state </li></ul><ul><li>They can be used for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>team work and collaborative papers (avoiding emailed MS Word file around) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Note-taking and social discussions at events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As an easy way to set up a group Web site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A great e-learning tool </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Uses a simple markup language (wikitext or wikisyntax) </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to compare previous versions of a page, revert back and track who edited the page </li></ul><ul><li>Many allow users to discuss issues prior to making changes </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing popularity in the public sector </li></ul>
    11. 12. Wikipedia <ul><li>Easy to create </li></ul><ul><li>Provides high-profile information (Google-friendly) </li></ul><ul><li>Allows the community to enhance and develop content </li></ul><ul><li>Is time your organisation had an entry? </li></ul><ul><li>Who will edit it? </li></ul>
    12. 13. Wiki Issues <ul><li>Vandalism, spam </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Searching (more tagging needed), archiving (ephemeral), organisation of pages – no heirarchy </li></ul><ul><li>Mark up – no standardisation…yet – training implications </li></ul><ul><li>Stopping your wiki from becoming an unmaintained storehouse of out-of-date information! </li></ul><ul><li>Organisational Culture - Freedom to move away from usual design, protocols, habits </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the merits of a closed-access wiki for certain tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Resources - Staff training, time, costs </li></ul><ul><li>How will you add wikis and blogs to your resource collections? </li></ul>
    13. 14. Wiki Potential <ul><li>“ At their best, they can become true community resources that can position the library as a an online hub of their local community true community resources that can position the library as a an online hub of their local community” Meredith Farkas </li></ul><ul><li>Book reviews, reviews of exhibitions, FAQs </li></ul><ul><li>Comments section, suggestion box </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly asked questions </li></ul><ul><li>Local history, personal stories, personal views on exhibits </li></ul><ul><li>Course collaboration, e-portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>Staff project work, input for research work </li></ul>
    14. 15. Social Networks <ul><li>Sharing and community are what Web 2.0 is all about </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the most famous networks are MySpace, Facebook, del.icio.us, Frappr and Flickr </li></ul><ul><li>Aspects of museums, libraries and archives already operate as a social network in themselves so the implications for it are huge </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging – allows users to add keywords to items </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Created by groups/communities who are the resource users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Natural language – common understanding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No hierarchy, feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Good for subjective and descriptive data collection </li></ul></ul><ul><li>RSS Feeds </li></ul>
    15. 16. Sharing - Flickr <ul><li>Web 2.0 includes community-building </li></ul><ul><li>You can help support your community-building by making it easy to share photos at events (e.g. this seminar) </li></ul><ul><li>Simply suggest a tag e.g. ‘ouls-2007 and encourage delegates to upload their photos with this tag </li></ul>Web 2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/ iwmw2006/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/westmontlibrary/176505152/
    16. 17. Sharing – del.icio.us <ul><li>Another aspect of sharing is sharing bookmarks </li></ul><ul><li>This can be used to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage your bookmarks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow others to contribute resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow lists of bookmarks to be repurposed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carry out impact analysis </li></ul></ul>Web 2.0 Who else has bookmarked this resources? What are their interests? (I may have similar interests) How many have bookmarked my resource? http://del.icio.us/mariekeguy/ouls-2007
    17. 18. Creative Commons <ul><li>Creative Commons offers copyright holders licences to assign to their work </li></ul><ul><li>The licences aim to clarify the conditions of use and avoid many of the problems current copyright laws pose when attempting to share information. </li></ul><ul><li>CC maximises impact of work </li></ul>Web 2.0 Openess is a key aspect of Web 2.0: open source; open standards and open content can all help to bring benefits through maximising usage of services
    18. 19. Google Maps/Mashups <ul><li>Web 2.0 provides valuable opportunity to provide mapping & location services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Embedding Google maps on your Web sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing rich services using this </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing location metadata / microformats which can be processed by simple browser tools </li></ul></ul>Web 2.0 http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/ workshops/webmaster-2007/maps/ http://www.talis.com/tdn/competition
    19. 20. Communication <ul><li>Realtime discussion is a key part of the Web 2.0 and the .net generation (IM, SMS…) </li></ul><ul><li>Can be used by patrons, chat reference services with transcript </li></ul><ul><li>How much effort does it take to provide an instant messaging service? </li></ul><ul><li>Try Gabbly.com </li></ul><ul><li>What about Skype? </li></ul>Web 2.0 http://www.gabbly.com/
    20. 21. Web 2.0 Backlash <ul><li>When significant new things appear: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enthusiasts / early adopters predict a transformation of society </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sceptics outline the limitations & deficiencies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There’s a need to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote the benefits to the wider community (esp. those willing to try if convinced of benefits) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be realistic and recognise limitations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Address inappropriate criticisms, avoid the chasm in the Gartner curve </li></ul></ul>Web 2.0: It’s a silly name. It’s just a marketing term. There are lots of poor Web 2.0 services. There wasn’t a Web 1.0. What follows it? It does have a marketing aspect – and that’s OK. It isn’t formally defined – it describes a pattern of related usage. There will be poor (and good) Web 2.0 services – just like anything else. Any usage will arrive at a follow-up term.
    21. 22. Web 2.0 - Summary <ul><li>Paul Miller stated that he saw Web 2.0 as being about: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>freeing of data, remixing and the opening up of the long tail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the building of virtual applications, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>participation, sharing, communication and facilitating community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>applications that work for the user, are modular and are smart </li></ul></ul>
    22. 23. Cultural Services 2.0 <ul><li>With Web 2.0 cultural services have an opportunity to work their wealth of resources harder and serve their existing audiences better </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>+ Library = Library 2.0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>+Museum = Museum 2.0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>+Archive = Archive 2.0 </li></ul></ul>Warning: Users will bypass processes and institutions that they perceive to be slow, unresponsive, unappealing and irrelevant in favour of a more direct approach to services offered by others that just might be 'good enough' for what they need to do.
    23. 24. Discussion (20 Minutes) <ul><li>So what are the challenges of Web 2.0 for the MLA </li></ul><ul><li>community? </li></ul><ul><li>In small groups list: </li></ul><ul><li>The top 5 challenges for the MLA community? </li></ul><ul><li>Possible ways that you can meet these challenges </li></ul>
    24. 25. Questions?

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