Value and Impact of Librarians’
Embedded IL Teaching on Student
Skills Development
LIVES Project (Library Impact and
Value...
Background to the Project
• Recent literature holds accounts of libraries
working to evidence the impact of their
activiti...
Project Aim
To discover the perceived impact and to identify the
value of four library interventions within the curriculum...
Project Objectives
• To analyse the perceived impact of four library
interventions on students’ information skills
develop...
Methodology
• Literature review
• Looked for changes (based on Markless &
Streatfield’s ‘Impact Implementation Initiative’...
FET Library Online Workbook
(FET LOW)
• Online tutorial
• Introduced briefly in a lecture
• Embedded within UG & Foundatio...
HLS Problem-based Learning
• Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
• Problem based learning
• MSc Public Health. Critical Ap...
Findings: Structure, Content and
Administration
“The methodology…I think that was the best way to be taught
really…I loved...
– Content relevance and timing
– Structure
“Yes 4 [people] in [a] group[s], so like that was the right amount
and they alw...
-BUT
“It wasn’t so easy for [the librarian] to pay
attention to everyone and we had different
questions, so she had differ...
Findings: Perceived Impact
Neutral, 16%
Negative, 0%
Postive, 84%
Comments
Neutral
Negative
Postive
UHMLG Summer 2014
Just under 20% of the HLS comments about impact related to an
increase in confidence in searching for information:
“I am m...
- Altered searching behaviour
“ I could find that you have those palliative care research and
comparing with what I was ge...
- Altered attitude towards librarians
“I think [the librarian demonstration] shows the
students that librarians have parti...
- Improved searching competence
“It’s easier for me now, before I could be searching
around a particular topic and I would...
- Development of new skills
“…before I had a problem on how to export some of
the papers I got after doing the search on t...
Findings: Motivation to Engage
Investment for skills needed in further modules
“…to do a systematic review for my disserta...
• Practical elements
“... [the thing I liked best about the session was that] we actually
did it ... we were given the top...
Findings: Drivers to Embedding
Library Skills Teaching
- The librarian/faculty staff relationship
- Improving student enga...
- Ease of implementation
Staff resource
- Evidence of library intervention success being made available to
faculty staff s...
Findings: Barriers to Embedding
Library Skills Teaching
• Lack of staff time and large staff workloads
• Faculty staff att...
Building Partnerships:
What We Do
• Inherited relationships
• Attend faculty meetings
• Meet regularly with academic staff...
Recommendations
• Produce recommendations/toolkit for best practice
for building relationships with faculty staff
• Expand...
Impact for Health and Life Sciences
• Growth of PBL approach in other
programmes, and at other levels of study
UHMLG Summe...
Searching activity
UHMLG Summer 2014
•In pairs, discuss what the
theme (s) of this picture is
(are)
•Identify keywords tha...
Starting Point
What can you
see in the
picture?
E.g. Fruit
Note down 5
words that are
more specific.
E.g. Apple
List 5 wor...
UHMLG Summer 2014
HLS online workbook
Academic Liaison checklist
Use of new evaluation form
Enthusiasm to revisit skills –...
Sticky note reflection on
measuring our value and impact
Your contributions at Conference on 2 themes:
What we do now
and
...
Questions?
Jacqueline Chelin, Deputy Librarian and Learning and
Teaching Fellow, Jacqueline.Chelin@uwe.ac.uk
Caroline Plai...
References
• Shreeve, S., Chelin, J., Delaney, E., Hamley, J. and Plaice, C. (2013) Value and Impact of Librarians’
Interv...
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Value and Impact of Librarians’ Embedded IL Teaching on Student Skills Development

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Jackie Chelin and Caroline Plaice

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  • Faculty of Health and Life Sciences is home to around 5,000 students.

    HLS subject librarians were keen to develop a more interactive style of teaching information literacy (IL) and began to develop sessions using a pbl pedagogy, which was widely used in the Faculty already.

    I’m sure many of us are familiar and indeed using Problem Based Learning, but I thought for consistency, it would be good to share a definition:

    From John Savery:

    PBL is a learner centred approach that empowers learners to conduct research, integrate theory and practice, and apply knowledge and skills to develop a viable solution to a defined problem.


    So, we choice a module to start with that colleagues were already very much embedded in, and had good relationships with academic colleagues.

    This was within the MSc Public Health, a group of around 25 students.

    One of these sessions was embedded within the ‘Critical Appraisal Skills’ module.
    90 minute sessions led by the librarian, hands-on
    Gives students an opportunity to practice searching the databases using a quasi real-life case study or scenario. One example question: “what social and cultural factors affect insecticide treated bed net use consistency in Asia’. This was a previous dissertation title

    Students to form groups of 3 and assign roles to themselves:
    searcher or seeker (who types out the searches)
    scribe (who makes notes on the worksheet)
    spokesperson (who feeds back to the whole group at the end)
    Brainstorm and search for 30 minutes and then feed back and discussion
    HLS students are not directly assessed on what they learn during these sessions, although it is expected that they will apply the skills learnt during the completion of their dissertation.
  • Using Markless themes, a thematic analysis was carried out of the responses.

    Behaviour (doing things differently)
    Competence (doing things better)
    Levels of knowledge
    Attitudes (e.g. confidence, valuing librarians)
     
    Faculty staff interviews
    Librarian interviews for clarification of drivers and barriers to embedding the interventions
    Student focus groups

    Moving on to the findings, we’ve illustrated our main conclusions with quotes from those who were interviewed during the process.

    Looking at the aspect of the structure, content and administration of the learning and teaching intervention, Faculty staff and students were largely positive. They also give us some constructive criticism and suggestions of how to improve what we were doing, and those are things we’ve acted on since undertaking the interviews.
     
    Positive comments included consideration of the methodologies used – such as the hands on nature and the practical application of the HLS problem based learning class.
  • They liked where we had made the content relevant and tailored to their needs, and that the workshop came almost straight after the lecture, also delivered by a library colleague.
    It was interesting that one respondent commented on the session working because people in the group felt confident with eachother.
  • Some developmental comments for us, including that for larger groups, more than one member of Library staff is very useful. Although of course this is not always possible
  • Moving on to the perceived impact of the library learning and teaching interventions, the comments collected do provide a powerful body of evidence of the perceived impact and value of the library interventions.
    The overwhelming majority of comments across all of the 4 different interventions (84%) were positive with none being negative, and the remaining 16% being neutral or constructive (e.g. some lecturers hadn’t yet observed any evidence of the library interventions affecting their students’ confidence or research skills, but in both cases they explained that they hadn’t yet set any assignments that would enable them to assess those skills for individual students.)
  • For HLS specifically, there were just under 20% of the positive comments related to improved confidence
  • Other perceived positive impacts included:
    Altered searching behaviour
    in terms of less use of Google and Wikipedia
    A growth in awareness of using different language to search for something
    in terms of use of new resources, including a variety of reliable library sources
     
    HLS students made use of new resources including Cochrane the Cochrane database for HLS students, “that’s the biz!”).
  • Other perceived positive impacts included:
    Altered attitude towards librarians
    In addition to positive comments, particularly from lecturers, regarding the librarians’ input into the teaching, there were also comments that showed the library teaching had prompted a change in the students’ attitude towards librarians.
  • improved competence - 11 out of 29 positive impact comments, so 38%.

    Improved competence in terms of:
    knowledge of which databases to use when
    improved use of search terms and truncation
    finding more relevant results
    finding results more quickly and easily
    better handling of results
  • Learning new and transferable skills such as:
    referencing
    evaluation of resources
  • Moving on to the students’ motivation to engage with the teaching, some of the interventions had an assessed piece of work which students felt was a useful motivator, because the student then learned things that they might otherwise not have bothered to find out about.
     
    Where there wasn’t a direct assessment of the library intervention, there was recognition that those skills would be needed for successful completion of a dissertation. One HLS student commented “I wanted to get more skills … for dissertation, to make it easier so that I don’t have to waste as much time.”
  • Presenting the information literacy instruction within a disciplinary context and using examples relevant to the students
     
    Including a practical element so that students could try out their newly learnt skills in a supportive environment

    It was particularly successful when a member of staff told the students to attend!
  • The librarian/faculty staff relationship and a desire to improve student engagement with library information skills teaching were key factors in driving the embedding the library intervention.
    Development of a new curriculum provided an entre
  • Further drivers to embedding library IL teaching are:
     
    Ease of Implementation –for those who had embedded sessions, they acknowledged the ease of implementing and scheduling the sessions. An unexpected outcome was that the lecturer was able to get to know the students more, whilst not having to concentrate on teaching!
     
  • Lack of Time and Large Workload
    Large workloads for academic staff and a lack of time were acknowledged as reasons for not embedding library skills teaching (although those who had embedded sessions acknowledged the ease of implementing and scheduling the sessions)
     
    Students Already Have IL Skills
    The HLS librarian observed “There can be an assumption, incorrectly, that by a process of osmosis that [students] will have the information skills they need or the information about the Library and often they don’t, and things move on so quickly that how can they?”

    Lack of Curriculum Time - difficulties fitting the library session into the timetable when the curriculum is very full and quite challenging for the students (or lack of assessment time – a worry of over-assessing students)
     
    Lack of Awareness of the Library Offering:
    “I don’t know if [staff] do [know about the option of involving the library]” Criminal Law lecturer and supported by FET lecturer comments
     
    Lack of Opportunity to Develop Librarian/Faculty Staff Relationship
    Due to UWE’s governance and meeting structure, librarians may meet associate heads and programme leaders fairly regularly but they may not meet module leaders regularly and some they may never encounter

  • Having explored the drivers and barriers to getting information literacy embedded within the curriculum, we also looked at the ways librarians and academic staff collaborate and build partnerships.
     
    The librarians who were interviewed acknowledged that it can take a significant amount of time and effort to build up good relationships between librarians and faculty staff and they also noted that relationships had at times been ‘inherited’
     
     [“For adult nursing ... before a session in Year 2, we get the module team to come and have a refresher with us ... I think the people who come appreciate it, in a way it is a safe space for them to explore things that maybe they feel they should know about but haven’t used for a long time as they haven’t been studying for themselves ... [an] informal session over lunchtime.” HLS librarian]

    These are some of the successful strategies and processes at UWE, which emerged from the research, and which encourage the development of this relationship. It is probably not an exhaustive list and not particularly unique, but the librarians interviewed felt these methods had had an impact:
  • So, to summarise the conclusions from our research – there isn’t anything that I don’t think we didn’t already know, but now we have some evidence to illustrate it.
     
    With this evidence, we want to continue to work towards a best practice toolkit for building relationships with academic staff, and I’m sure we will pick up a few new ideas from the conference this week;
     
    We want to work to continue the reach of the types of teaching we have tested here, as we have evidence that it does have a positive impact;
     
    We will continue to develop our own information literacy framework to illustrate where library teaching plays a part and offers best value for students;
     
    And we are currently working on a learning and teaching strategy for the library, which will include review and recommendations of teaching best practice, to ensure we continue to try new ideas, evaluate them, and deliver impactful teaching.
  • Adult nursing,
  • We have our own workbook,
    Developed a checklist and evaluation form
    And perhaps most importantly, used the opportunity to refresh our approaches

    Thank you for listening. Any questions?
  • Value and Impact of Librarians’ Embedded IL Teaching on Student Skills Development

    1. 1. Value and Impact of Librarians’ Embedded IL Teaching on Student Skills Development LIVES Project (Library Impact and Value for Education and Skills) Jacqueline Chelin and Caroline Plaice University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol UHMLG Summer 2014
    2. 2. Background to the Project • Recent literature holds accounts of libraries working to evidence the impact of their activities – Oakleaf (2010); Creaser and Spezi (2012); Tenopir and Kaufman (2012) • UWE faculty librarians discussed how they might measure and evidence the impact of their teaching on student skills development • Curriculum refresh at UWE Bristol UHMLG Summer 2014
    3. 3. Project Aim To discover the perceived impact and to identify the value of four library interventions within the curriculum in developing student information skills at UWE Bristol. • FET Library Online Workbook • FBL Legal Methods ‘Building Legal Information Skills’ (BLIS) activity • FBL Criminal Law library teaching • HLS Critical Appraisal Skills Problem-based Learning UHMLG Summer 2014
    4. 4. Project Objectives • To analyse the perceived impact of four library interventions on students’ information skills development • To define and promote the value of the impacts measured • To gather feedback on the library interventions to identify possible enhancements and to improve librarian teaching • To investigate the drivers and barriers to faculty staff embedding library teaching within their modules UHMLG Summer 2014
    5. 5. Methodology • Literature review • Looked for changes (based on Markless & Streatfield’s ‘Impact Implementation Initiative’) in: • Behaviour (doing things differently) • Competence (doing things better) • Levels of knowledge • Attitudes (e.g. confidence, valuing librarians) • Faculty staff and librarian interviews • Student focus groups UHMLG Summer 2014
    6. 6. FET Library Online Workbook (FET LOW) • Online tutorial • Introduced briefly in a lecture • Embedded within UG & Foundation modules (>550 students) • Context specific examples, practice, exercises • Multiple choice assessment – 24 hour window • Worth 6-14% of the module mark UHMLG Summer 2014
    7. 7. HLS Problem-based Learning • Faculty of Health and Life Sciences • Problem based learning • MSc Public Health. Critical Appraisal Skills module • 90 minute session in library PC lab, hands-on • Students search the databases using a quasi real-life case study in groups • No direct assessment, although skills are needed for dissertation literature review UHMLG Summer 2014
    8. 8. Findings: Structure, Content and Administration “The methodology…I think that was the best way to be taught really…I loved that it was practical” HLS student “Found the practical application to a scenario very useful” HLS student UHMLG Summer 2014
    9. 9. – Content relevance and timing – Structure “Yes 4 [people] in [a] group[s], so like that was the right amount and they always concentrated and it was in a similar room, we are confident with one another, how to go about things, so that was good, that is the best way” HLS student “[The Library teaching] fits very nicely with the lecture on systematic review” HLS Lecturer “What was good…was that [the librarian] actually was live doing a search, so they could actually see, when you combine search terms…I think having that live demo was probably helpful for the students” HLS Lecturer UHMLG Summer 2014
    10. 10. -BUT “It wasn’t so easy for [the librarian] to pay attention to everyone and we had different questions, so she had different things to say to everybody” HLS student UHMLG Summer 2014
    11. 11. Findings: Perceived Impact Neutral, 16% Negative, 0% Postive, 84% Comments Neutral Negative Postive UHMLG Summer 2014
    12. 12. Just under 20% of the HLS comments about impact related to an increase in confidence in searching for information: “I am more relaxed and comfortable about doing the search” HLS student “I can look at the key words in a research title or subject and be able to confidently use it for the search.” HLS student UHMLG Summer 2014
    13. 13. - Altered searching behaviour “ I could find that you have those palliative care research and comparing with what I was getting from Google Scholar I think it was better quality” HLS student “Now I know that some others could be talking about the same thing, but they just use different words…[or the] …spellings might just be different if you were searching American journals…if I search on a particular spelling and it is not right I am not getting what I want, I try another spelling “ HLS student UHMLG Summer 2014
    14. 14. - Altered attitude towards librarians “I think [the librarian demonstration] shows the students that librarians have particular skills that others don’t necessarily have and they are hearing it from experts, like I don’t think I could have delivered that lecture to the same standard, certainly not with the same background of knowledge, so that was good” HLS lecturer UHMLG Summer 2014
    15. 15. - Improved searching competence “It’s easier for me now, before I could be searching around a particular topic and I wouldn’t know what to do…but now I know how to put in the search words, synonyms, the truncation, that sort of stuff, it is easier to search now…” HLS Student UHMLG Summer 2014
    16. 16. - Development of new skills “…before I had a problem on how to export some of the papers I got after doing the search on the database… but after training I knew how to add those papers to folders and to export them” HLS Student UHMLG Summer 2014
    17. 17. Findings: Motivation to Engage Investment for skills needed in further modules “…to do a systematic review for my dissertation…[would] involve looking for articles and summarising them, and so I thought the Library research skills would be the most helpful for my project…so I thought it would be beneficial for my dissertation” HLS student “… just to enhance my ability to learn new things like continuing to present good work” HLS student UHMLG Summer 2014
    18. 18. • Practical elements “... [the thing I liked best about the session was that] we actually did it ... we were given the topic and we were guided through searching different databases.” HLS student Partnership working with academic colleagues UHMLG Summer 2014 “…You were told it would be very necessary to attend those sessions if you were to succeed in the module…yes [the module leader who told us that]” HLS student
    19. 19. Findings: Drivers to Embedding Library Skills Teaching - The librarian/faculty staff relationship - Improving student engagement - Curriculum refresh “ Just knowing academics in general, I think, as so much is electronic now, if they can find the papers they want electronically, they they perhaps don’t have so much contact with the Library because there is less need to” HLS lecturer “I think the new curriculum has probably got something to do with the fact that ... it was really opportune ... to introduce something very practical, giving the students an opportunity to practice what they had just learned, and it all fitted together really well”. HLS librarian UHMLG Summer 2014
    20. 20. - Ease of implementation Staff resource - Evidence of library intervention success being made available to faculty staff so that they are aware of the library offering “It was quite early on in the module, and I think it was quite a good ice breaker and for me to get to know them a bit better, not just me stood there lecturing them” HLS lecturer ”…this is a course I took over from someone else that had been running for a long time…and the Library teaching sort of fits in…” HLS lecturer UHMLG Summer 2014
    21. 21. Findings: Barriers to Embedding Library Skills Teaching • Lack of staff time and large staff workloads • Faculty staff attitude: – students already have information literacy skills • Lack of curriculum time • Lack of awareness of the library offering • Lack of opportunity to develop staff relationships UHMLG Summer 2014
    22. 22. Building Partnerships: What We Do • Inherited relationships • Attend faculty meetings • Meet regularly with academic staff • Pop up Library • Regular library refresher sessions for staff • New staff ‘Welcome’ emails • Involvement in induction sessions or IL training for new module leaders UHMLG Summer 2014
    23. 23. Recommendations • Produce recommendations/toolkit for best practice for building relationships with faculty staff • Expand the reach of tailored, embedded, assessed library interventions • Develop UWE’s information literacy framework to incorporate library intervention best practice • Develop a Library Learning and Teaching Strategy, to include creation of a set of recommendations/toolkit for best practice for library IL skills teaching UHMLG Summer 2014
    24. 24. Impact for Health and Life Sciences • Growth of PBL approach in other programmes, and at other levels of study UHMLG Summer 2014
    25. 25. Searching activity UHMLG Summer 2014 •In pairs, discuss what the theme (s) of this picture is (are) •Identify keywords that would use in a search •Try them in SportsDiscus •How many relevant results can you find? •Can you access the full text? By Tsutomu Takasu (Flickr: Joan Gamper Trophy) [CC- BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
    26. 26. Starting Point What can you see in the picture? E.g. Fruit Note down 5 words that are more specific. E.g. Apple List 5 words that are related. E.g. Nutrition By InterestingPics (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by- sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
    27. 27. UHMLG Summer 2014 HLS online workbook Academic Liaison checklist Use of new evaluation form Enthusiasm to revisit skills – Foundation in Teaching and Learning programme
    28. 28. Sticky note reflection on measuring our value and impact Your contributions at Conference on 2 themes: What we do now and What we would like to do UHMLG Summer 2014
    29. 29. Questions? Jacqueline Chelin, Deputy Librarian and Learning and Teaching Fellow, Jacqueline.Chelin@uwe.ac.uk Caroline Plaice, Faculty Librarian: Health and Applied Sciences, Caroline.Plaice@uwe.ac.uk www.uwe.ac.uk/library UHMLG Summer 2014
    30. 30. References • Shreeve, S., Chelin, J., Delaney, E., Hamley, J. and Plaice, C. (2013) Value and Impact of Librarians’ Interventions on Student Skills Development (Library Impact and Value For Education and Skills: LIVES) Project: Phase 1 Report [online]. UWE. Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/21776 [Accessed 03 April 2014]. • Shreeve, S. and Chelin, J. (2014) Value and Impact of Librarians’ Interventions on Student Skills Development. New Review of Academic Librarianship, 20. pp. 204-232. • Creaser, C. and Spezi, V. (2012) Working together: evolving value for academic libraries [online]. Loughborough University and SAGE. Available from: http://libraryvalue.wordpress.com/report [Accessed 10 April 2012]. • Oakleaf, M. (2010) Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report [online]. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries. Available from: http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/?p=36 [Accessed 10 April 2012]. • Markless, S. and Streatfield, D. (2006) Gathering and supplying evidence of the impact of UK university libraries on student learning and research: a facilitated action research approach. International Journal of Information Management. 26, pp.3-15. • Tenopir, C. and Kaufman, P. (2012) The Lib-Value Project: Value, Outcomes and Return on Investment of Academic Libraries [online]. Institute of Museum and Library Services. Available from: http://libvalue.cci.utk.edu/content/lib-value-project [Accessed 03 APril 2012]. • Savery, J.R. (2006) Overview of Problem-Based Learning: Definitions and Distinctions. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning [online]. 1(1), pp 9-20. [Accessed 01 July 2014]. UHMLG Summer 2014

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