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Oceanic Exchanges presentation

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Oceanic Exchanges: Tracing Global Information Networks in Historical Newspaper Repositories, 1840–1914

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Oceanic Exchanges presentation

  1. 1. http://oceanicexchanges.org/
  2. 2. • Digitized newspaper corpora currently siloed in national collections • Historical newspaper archives have been digitised by public entities (the Library of Congress, Hemeroteca Nacional de México), commercial companies (Gale Cengage or DC Thomson/FindMyPast), and public-private partnerships (the British Newspaper Archive). • The problem of OCR-related noise, or imperfect comparability of corpora Challenges
  3. 3. Member Institutions and PIs • Northeastern University, US. Ryan Cordell (Consortium PI) • University of Nebraska–Lincoln, US. Elizabeth Lorang • North Carolina State University, US. Paul Fyfe • University of Turku, Finland. Hannu Salmi • University College London, UK. Ulrich Tiedau • Loughborough University, UK. Melodee Beals • Utrecht University, Netherlands. Jaap Verheul • National Autonomous University of Mexico. Isabel Galina Russell • Universität Stuttgart. Steffen Koch Member Institutions and PIs
  4. 4. Member Institutions and PIs • Northeastern University, US. Ryan Cordell (Consortium PI) • University of Nebraska–Lincoln, US. Elizabeth Lorang • North Carolina State University, US. Paul Fyfe • University of Turku, Finland. Hannu Salmi • University College London, UK. Ulrich Tiedau • Loughborough University, UK. Melodee Beals • Utrecht University, Netherlands. Jaap Verheul • National Autonomous University of Mexico. Isabel Galina Russell • Universität Stuttgart. Steffen Koch Member Institutions and PIs The Finnish Team: Otto Latva Asko Nivala Mila Oiva Hannu Salmi
  5. 5. Data Providers Germany • Berlin State Library • Hamburg State Library • Bavarian State Library Netherlands • National Library of the Netherlands United Kingdom • British Library • Cengage Publishing Finland • National Library of Finland Data Providers
  6. 6. Available Data for the Project Australia’s Trove Newspapers http://trove.nla.gov.au 18.5 million British Newspapers Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk 14.5 million Chronicling America (US) http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov 11 million Europeana Newspapers http://europeana-newspapers.eu 20 million Hemeroteca Nacional Digital de México http://www.hndm.unam.mx 9 million National Library of Finland http://digi.kansalliskirjasto.fi/sanomalehti 2 million National Library of the Netherlands http://www.delpher.nl/nl/kranten 11 million National Library of Wales http://newspapers.library.wales 1.1 million New Zealand's PapersPast http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz 4 million Cengage Newsvault (commercial) http://goo.gl/OgCvUo 16 million Available Data for the Project
  7. 7. • To build classifiers for textual and visual similarity of related newspaper passages; • To create a networked ontology of different genres, forms, and textual elements that emerged during the nineteenth century; • To model and visualise textual migration and viral culture; • To model and visualise conceptual migration and translation of texts across regional, national, and linguistic boundaries; • To analyze the sensitivity and generality of results; release public collections Aims
  8. 8. 1. Which stories spread between nations and how quickly? 2. Which texts were translated and resonated across languages? 3. How did textual copying (reprinting) operate internationally compared to conceptual copying (ideas spread)? 4. How did the migration of texts facilitate the circulation of knowledge, ideas, and concepts, and how were these ideas transformed as they moved from one Atlantic context to another? 5. How did geopolitical realities (e.g. economic integration, technology, migration, geopolitical power) influence the directionality of these transnational exchanges? 6. How does reporting in immigrant and ethnic communities differ from reporting in surrounding host countries? 7. Does the national organization of digitized newspaper archives artificially foreclose globally-oriented research questions and outcomes? Questions
  9. 9. THANK YOU! My digital book collection in 1994.

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