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What is College?
By: Brieana Polk-Perez and Tatum O’Driscoll
Why go to college?
- Unlock opportunities: learning, employment, interact with other students
your age, upward mobility
- ...
What type of college are you
interested in attending?
- Community College: teaching oriented with no research focus. Teach...
Requirements
- Community college: open to everyone with a HS diploma or GED, usually
around $46 per unit
- CSU: GPA depend...
What is an academic major &
how do you choose it?
- Major: a subject area to focus on while in college. This is typically ...
Major Fields at UC Santa Cruz
Anthropology
Applied Physics
Art
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Bioengineering
Bioinform...
What is an academic minor?
Unlike a major a minor is a student’s secondary academic discipline during their
undergraduate ...
What are college courses like?
- What your classes are like depends on the school you attend, but typically
classes are tw...
Term length
- Once again the term length depends on the school you attend, but there are
two main categories:
1. Quarter s...
Where do you live when
attending college?
- On campus: dorms, student apartments (not included in tuition) Some
schools ma...
The application process
- Test scores: SAT, ACT, SAT Subject Tests, AP Exams, IB Exams
- High School Transcripts: required...
Deciding on a school
- Research Tools: College Board, College Prowler, School Websites, and
others
- Safety Schools: you’r...
Deciding on classes
- General Education: these classes are requirements by the school. They’re
usually made to diversify y...
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Meet 2 What Is College?

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What even is college?

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Meet 2 What Is College?

  1. 1. What is College? By: Brieana Polk-Perez and Tatum O’Driscoll
  2. 2. Why go to college? - Unlock opportunities: learning, employment, interact with other students your age, upward mobility - Become more independent: choose your own courses and class schedule, explore subjects in greater depth than you did in high school, participate in extracurricular activities that interest you - Explore inside and outside the classroom: find out what interests you, what you enjoy doing, who you like to interact with, etc. - Invest in yourself: build knowledge, discover your passions, learn more about yourself, make new friends, prepare for your future
  3. 3. What type of college are you interested in attending? - Community College: teaching oriented with no research focus. Teachers in community colleges mainly focus on preparing their students to transfer to four year schools - CSU: practical application & non research oriented, lean towards smaller classes, more likely to be taught by a single, consistent professor - UC: research theory, & studies oriented, based on self-motivated style of learning, more postgraduate options - Private: independent, set own policies & goals, privately funded, may be research or teaching oriented, may be religious or single sex
  4. 4. Requirements - Community college: open to everyone with a HS diploma or GED, usually around $46 per unit - CSU: GPA depends on which school you are applying to, complete SAT or ACT, A-G courses, fill out application online, no personal statement, and application fee of $55 (fee waivers available) - UC: at least a 3.0 GPA, complete the SAT or ACT, complete A-G courses, fill out the application online, personal statement, and application fee of $60 (fee waivers available) - Private: specific requirements based on the school
  5. 5. What is an academic major & how do you choose it? - Major: a subject area to focus on while in college. This is typically an area of interest of yours that allows you to take classes that are important to you. This will eventually be the degree you receive at graduation. - When to choose: before you enter or in college (usually before the end of your sophomore year) - Requirements: each major typically has lower division courses, typically lighter on the workload for freshman, that are required in order to declare your major
  6. 6. Major Fields at UC Santa Cruz Anthropology Applied Physics Art Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Bioengineering Bioinformatics Biology Business Management Economics Chemistry Classical Studies Cognitive Science Community Studies Computer Engineering Computer Science Computer Science: Computer Game Design Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Earth Sciences Ecology and Evolution Economics Education and Teaching Electrical Engineering Environmental Studies Feminist Studies Field and Exchange Programs Film & Digital Media German Studies Global Economics History History of Art and Visual Culture Human Biology Italian Studies Jewish Studies Language Studies Latin American and Latino Studies Legal Studies Linguistics Literature Marine Biology Mathematics Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology Music Network and Digital Technology Neuroscience Philosophy Physics Physics (Astrophysics) Physics Education Plant Sciences Politics Prelaw Premedicine Psychology Robotics Engineering Sociology Spanish Studies Technology and Information Management Theater Arts Writing
  7. 7. What is an academic minor? Unlike a major a minor is a student’s secondary academic discipline during their undergraduate studies. In order to obtain a minor it typically takes a total of two years of study at a university in a selected subject Examples of undergraduate minors at UCSC: Anthropology, applied mathematics, biology, chemistry, computer science, dance, economics, education, electronic music, film & digital media, history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, theater arts, politics, etc.
  8. 8. What are college courses like? - What your classes are like depends on the school you attend, but typically classes are twice a week, at any time of the day, and usually about an hour and 45 minutes long - You’re much more responsible for turning in assignments and keeping track of your grades
  9. 9. Term length - Once again the term length depends on the school you attend, but there are two main categories: 1. Quarter system: 10 weeks, 3 quarters in a year 2. Semester system: 15-17 weeks, 2 semesters in a year
  10. 10. Where do you live when attending college? - On campus: dorms, student apartments (not included in tuition) Some schools may require students to live on campus the first year they attend - Off campus: rent a house or apartment, at home with your family
  11. 11. The application process - Test scores: SAT, ACT, SAT Subject Tests, AP Exams, IB Exams - High School Transcripts: required by all schools asked for at different times - Recommendation Letters: from a teacher, counselor, or a community member - Essays: Varies by school in number and subject choice, but this is typically a time to let the school know who you are as a person - Interviews: depends on the school
  12. 12. Deciding on a school - Research Tools: College Board, College Prowler, School Websites, and others - Safety Schools: you’re more likely to get into with test scores and a gpa much higher than their average - Match Schools: you’re likely to get into with test scores and a gpa in their high to average range, but you may need the aid of extracurriculars and good essays - Reach Schools: you’re not as likely to get into with test scores and a gpa lower than their average and you need the aid of extracurriculars and good essays to get in. No one has an Ivy League as their safety school, these are all reach schools
  13. 13. Deciding on classes - General Education: these classes are requirements by the school. They’re usually made to diversify your courses while at college. Your major requirements will most likely fulfill some of the GE courses, but the rest you’ll have to choose on your own - Lower Division: classes typically taken your freshman or sophomore year - Upper Division: classes you’ll most likely take your sophomore, junior, or senior year. They have a more heavy workload. Not something you want to sign up for your first quarter or semester

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