In                        SuccessfulDISCUSSION PAPER        Aboriginal        ON GOVERNANCE   Schools                     ...
Clematis vitalba a.k.a. Old mans beard and Travellers JoyIt is time to fulfill the vision articulated in the 1972 PolicyPa...
Management                          Team Model                         governance                                       Po...
Successes and Governance in Aboriginal Schools •  Strong leadership and governance structures, often with long tenure     ...
• Chief Jimmy Bruneau School• Ahkwesahsne Mohawk Board of Education (AMBE• The Alert Bay Elementary School and Vancouver  ...
ChiefJimmyBruneauSchool
Artwork: Laura MarsdenKey Success FactorsFor all of the 20 successful Aboriginal schools identified in the 2 SAEEcase stud...
Key Success FactorsAssociated factors include visionary and exceptional leadership,innovative management models, strong lo...
Governance Features of Successful Aboriginal Schools“Challenging thestatus quo” in the boxnext to the leadershipsection of...
Long                                        Term                                      Planning                           S...
Artwork: Robert MertensWhat becomes evident in descriptions of successful Aboriginalschools is the organic, evolving natur...
Governance in                                 LINKS     First Nations                                           communitie...
Link: AboutTraditional Governancehttp://www.youtube.com/user/fngovernance/videos
Link to FNGC’s Traditional Governance VideosTom Happynook of Huu-ay-ut First Nation explains how traditionalleaders are ra...
rasunah@shaw.caDiscussion paper, Slideshow, Links
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Governance in Successful Aboriginal Schools by Rasunah Marsden

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UBC EDST 591 Presentation for Hands Back, Hands Forward Service Learning Project. http://blogs.ubc.ca/edst591

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  • It is time to fulfill the vision articulated in the 1972 Policy Paper ‘Indian Control of Indian Education’ and work with First Nations in the development ofa framework to enable First Nations education systems to emerge. Shawn A-in-Chut Atleo, December 2011
  • Surveys of 20 successful Aboriginal schools done by the Society for the Advancement of Excellence in Education (SAEE) in 2004 and 2007 have shown that success in Aboriginal schools is directly attributable to:Strong leadership and governance structures, often with long tenureHigh expectations for studentsFocus on academic achievement and long-term successSecure and welcoming climates for children and familiesRespect for Aboriginal culture and traditions to make learning relevantQuality staff developmentProvision of a wide range of programs/supports for learning (Bell, 2004)
  • Chief Jimmy Bruneau School Ahkwesahsne Mohawk Board of Education (AMBEThe Alert Bay Elementary School and Vancouver Island North (S.D. 85) Atikameg School, Northland S.D.61 Chalo School in Fort Nelson First Nation, B.C.Merrit Secondary School (MSS)
  • In 1969 when the Rae-Edzo School Society was formed through an agreement with the commissioner of the NWT, it became one of the first societies in Canada to establish Aboriginal control of education, and the Chief Jimmy Bruneau School was opened. Following legislation in 1996 which enabled the Ministry of Education to approve “alternate forms of educational governance,” (Fulford, 2007. p.65) the Tlicho Community Services Board was created. The partnership covers education, health and social services. Within this partnership, the Rae-Edzo Community Services Authority (RECSA) provides community governance, while the Tlicho Community Service Agency (TCSA) provides services at the regional level. The older Rae-Edzo Community Services Authority (RECSA) functions primarily as a parent council or in an advisory capacity. Acting as a regional school board, the TCSA has a representative on board from each of the 4 surrounding communities. Core funding is forwarded by the Govt. of the NW Territories to the TCSA, but additional third-party funding has been secured through efforts of both the school and the TCSA.
  • For all of the 20 successful Aboriginal schools identified in the 2 SAEE case studies“Governance and Leadership is the success factor identified most often by researchers in this study. Associated factors include visionary and exceptional leadership, innovative management models, strong local governance, the forging of community and research partnerships, challenging the status quo, long-term planning, mentorship and capacity building.”(Fulford, 2007. p. 325)
  • Key Success FactorsAssociated factors include visionary and exceptional leadership, innovative management models, strong local governance, the forging of community and research partnerships, challenging the status quo, long-term planning, mentorship and capacity building.”(Fulford, 2007. p. 325)
  • “Challenging the status quo” in the box next to the leadership section of the circle refers at Kitigan Zibi school to long term planning for programs, working to secure funding over several years, and tireless work to ensure governance policies locally meet the needs of the school. These policies are published and made available to all community members and updated regularly. At Kitigan Zibi, the Education Council has been able to prove that local application to the running of the school is what best suits the students.
  • Community leadership and a supportive school environment and strong governance are also considered characteristic of successful Aboriginal schools. What becomes clear about key success factors is that shared, continuous dynamic and supportive response from the Aboriginal community as a whole ensures success. It is these local, willing, many “Hands Back, Hands Forward” environments which provide the ingredients for success.
  • Governance in First Nations communities is often reflective of traditional governance practices, some of which may be centuries old. The education of First Nations children is recognized as borne by the whole community, and is a major priority forwarded by the A.F.N. A selected bibliography of readings in traditional Aboriginal Governance has been prepared for the First Nations Governance Centre in West Vancouver and is available on its website at:http://nwlc.ca/files/NWLC/resources/FNGCbibliography.pdf
  • Tom Happynook of Huu-ay-ut First Nation explains how traditional leaders are raised to learn the qualities and values of leadership. He also explains how traditional governance in his community is more democratic than the Canadian election process.
  • Tom Happynook of Huu-ay-ut First Nation explains how traditional leaders are raised to learn the qualities and values of leadership. He also explains how traditional governance in his community is more democratic than the Canadian election process
  • Governance in Successful Aboriginal Schools by Rasunah Marsden

    1. 1. In SuccessfulDISCUSSION PAPER Aboriginal ON GOVERNANCE Schools Provided for the Aboriginal Focus School
    2. 2. Clematis vitalba a.k.a. Old mans beard and Travellers JoyIt is time to fulfill the vision articulated in the 1972 PolicyPaper ‘Indian Control of Indian Education’ and work withFirst Nations in the development of a framework to enableFirst Nations education systems to emerge.Shawn A-in-Chut Atleo, December 2011
    3. 3. Management Team Model governance Policy Board Co-operative model Governance Models described in Mainstream literature:Management Team Model, Co-operative, Policy Board Model
    4. 4. Successes and Governance in Aboriginal Schools • Strong leadership and governance structures, often with long tenure • High expectations for students • Focus on academic achievement and long-term success • Secure and welcoming climates for children and families • Respect for Aboriginal culture and traditions to make learning relevant • Quality staff development• Provision of a wide range of programs/supports for learning (Bell, 2004)
    5. 5. • Chief Jimmy Bruneau School• Ahkwesahsne Mohawk Board of Education (AMBE• The Alert Bay Elementary School and Vancouver Island North (S.D. 85)• Atikameg School and Northland S.D.61• Chalo School in Fort Nelson First Nation, B.C.• Merrit Secondary School (MSS) Schools Featured in the Discussion Paper
    6. 6. ChiefJimmyBruneauSchool
    7. 7. Artwork: Laura MarsdenKey Success FactorsFor all of the 20 successful Aboriginal schools identified in the 2 SAEEcase studies, Governance and Leadership is the success factor identifiedmost often by researchers in this study.
    8. 8. Key Success FactorsAssociated factors include visionary and exceptional leadership,innovative management models, strong local governance, the forgingof community and research partnerships, challenging the statusquo, long-term planning, mentorship and capacity building.”(Fulford,2007. p. 325)
    9. 9. Governance Features of Successful Aboriginal Schools“Challenging thestatus quo” in the boxnext to the leadershipsection of the circlerefers at Kitigan Zibischool to long termplanning forprograms, working tosecure funding overseveral years, andtireless work toensure governancepolicies locally meetthe needs of theschool.These policies arepublished and madeavailable to allcommunity membersand updatedregularly.
    10. 10. Long Term Planning Securing Funding Ensure Policies meet Student NeedsChallenging the status quo…At Kitigan Zibi, the Education Council has been able to prove that localapplication to the running of the school is what best suits the students.
    11. 11. Artwork: Robert MertensWhat becomes evident in descriptions of successful Aboriginalschools is the organic, evolving nature of relationships
    12. 12. Governance in LINKS First Nations communities is often reflective of traditional governance practices, some of which may be centuries old. The education of First Nations children is recognized as borne by the whole community, and is a major priority forwarded by the A.F.N. A selected bibliography of readings in traditional Aboriginal Governance has been prepared for the First Nations Governance Centre in West Vancouver and is available on its website at:http://nwlc.ca/files/NWLC/resources/FNGCbibliography.pdf
    13. 13. Link: AboutTraditional Governancehttp://www.youtube.com/user/fngovernance/videos
    14. 14. Link to FNGC’s Traditional Governance VideosTom Happynook of Huu-ay-ut First Nation explains how traditionalleaders are raised to learn the qualities and values of leadership. Healso explains how traditional governance in his community is moredemocratic than the Canadian election process…http://youtu.be/TlA0NNCSKmc
    15. 15. rasunah@shaw.caDiscussion paper, Slideshow, Links

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