Rivers vs. Ponds

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Rivers vs. Ponds

  1. 1. Rivers vs. Ponds<br />Why the Future of the Collection Is Not a Collection<br />
  2. 2. The Recent Past: a Quick Review<br />1990s: The Gutenberg Terror comes to an end<br />Stage 1: Journals<br />Stage 2: Books – piecemeal (NetLibrary, etc.)<br />Stage 3: Books – wholesale (Google, Hathi Trust)<br />2000s: Gutenberg is tamed and domesticated<br />Print on demand<br />
  3. 3. The Recent Past: a Quick Review<br />Library hegemony comes to an end<br />Massive drop in unit price of information<br />Radical increase in ease of finding<br />Ready reference becomes a social exercise<br />Full-text searching obviates the proxy record<br />Access (for many) becomes virtually ubiquitous<br />Meanwhile, librarians working busily to undermine their own role as brokers (OA)<br />
  4. 4. The Current Reality<br />The collection is a bad guess at patron needs<br />Massive budget cuts make collecting hard to defend<br />Reference service is bypassed and unscalable<br />The OPAC is completely eclipsed as a discovery tool (even with WorldCat)<br />Circulation is down dramatically<br />Gate counts are up, but the stacks are deserted<br />
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  7. 7. The Current Reality<br />The collection is a bad guess at patron needs<br />Massive budget cuts make collecting hard to defend<br />Reference service is bypassed and unscalable<br />The OPAC is completely eclipsed as a discovery tool (even with WorldCat)<br />Circulation is down dramatically<br />Gate counts are up, but the stacks are deserted<br />
  8. 8. Circ Trends at the University of Utah<br />
  9. 9. New Models<br />Online  just-in-time (both e and p)<br />Online  breakdown of collection walls<br />Higher prices/less budget  less speculation<br />Higher prices/less budget  less archival purchasing<br />Less circulation  strong e-only momentum<br />Online + better data + higher prices + less budget  the end of the Big Deal and of the Medium Deal (title-level journal subscriptions) in favor of the Tiny Deal<br />Bottom line: Less collecting (ponds), more real-time brokerage (access to the river)<br />
  10. 10. What We Are Doing at UU<br />Formalised stance: e-first/patron-first<br />PDA pilot programs: MyiLibrary, ebrary, NetLibrary, EBL<br />Espresso Book Machine<br />No more bibliographers/subject specialists<br />Instead, College & Interdisciplinary Teams<br />SHEM (Science, Health, Engineering, Mines)<br />SEBS (Social Sciences, Education, Business, Social Work)<br />FAAPH (Fine Arts, Architecture/Planning, Humanities)<br />DOCMAPS (Documents, Maps)<br />MEDIA (Multimedia)<br />INTERINTER (International, Interdisciplinary)<br />
  11. 11. Predictions<br />The future of the library will not look much like a library<br /><ul><li>Small, focused local collections of books
  12. 12. Access to enormous public collections (Hathi, Google)
  13. 13. Few subscriptions, if any
  14. 14. No packages
  15. 15. A need for consolidated brokerage service at article level, not title level</li></ul>Journals are going the way of the record album<br /><ul><li>We’re headed back to a “song” economy</li></ul>Journal publishers are going the way of the record label<br /><ul><li>You can’t make as much on a 99-cent song as you can on a $15 album</li></li></ul><li>Stumbling Blocks<br /><ul><li>Sclerotic librarians
  16. 16. Fainthearted library leaders
  17. 17. (Legacy accreditation structures)
  18. 18. (Legacy RPT structures)
  19. 19. (Justifiably) fainthearted publishers
  20. 20. Customer-focused competitors</li></li></ul><li>Discuss!<br />Contact:<br />Rick Anderson<br />rick.anderson@utah.edu<br />

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