Presenter - Verity Pennisi                     EDU87197th Conference on Contemporary Issues in Education
“The fundamental principle of theinclusive school is that all children should    learn together, wherever possible,regardl...
Inclusive education in Education Queensland:•fosters a learning community that questionsdisadvantage and challenges social...
International –•The Individuals with Disabilities Act 1975•Salamanca Statement (2004)National –•Disability Discrimination ...
There is “a lack of uniformity acrossAustralia in the way in which students with         disabilities are identified.”    ...
The Department of Education and Training inQueensland recognises the following six disabilitycategories:•Autism Spectrum D...
l            Hear                   Learnin               iona                 ing I                        g Diffic      ...
Numbers and StatisticsNumber   OfStudents  with           VS    Number Special Needs                   Of                 ...
Diffe                                                                      re   ntiat                               pment ...
• The Teacher is the Key• A Whole School Approach to Inclusion• A Change in Structure• Consistency For All
“Queensland schools are leading innovative improvement     processes toward inclusion.”            Aniftos & McLuskie, (n....
“All concerned must now rise to the challenge  and work to ensure that Education for Alleffectively means FOR ALL, particu...
Aniftos, M., & McLuskie, L. (n.d.). On Track Toward Inclusive Education. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://www.aare.e...
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Inclusive Education: The Ongoing Challenges Facing Educators in Queensland State Schools

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Inclusive Education: The Ongoing Challenges Facing Educators in Queensland State Schools

  1. 1. Presenter - Verity Pennisi EDU87197th Conference on Contemporary Issues in Education
  2. 2. “The fundamental principle of theinclusive school is that all children should learn together, wherever possible,regardless of any difficulties or differences they may have.” (UNESCO, 1994, p. 11).
  3. 3. Inclusive education in Education Queensland:•fosters a learning community that questionsdisadvantage and challenges social injustice•maximises the educational and social outcomes of allstudents through the identification and reduction ofbarriers to learning, especially for those who arevulnerable to marginalisation and exclusion•ensures all students understand and value diversity sothat they have the knowledge and skills for positiveparticipation in a just, equitable and democratic globalsociety. Queensland Government (2005, p. 1)
  4. 4. International –•The Individuals with Disabilities Act 1975•Salamanca Statement (2004)National –•Disability Discrimination Act 1992•Disability Standards for Education (2004)State –•Education (General Provisions) Act 1989•Anti-Discrimination Act 1991•Disability Services Act 2006•Inclusive Education Statement – 2005 and the Principles ofInclusive Education (Policy CS-15)
  5. 5. There is “a lack of uniformity acrossAustralia in the way in which students with disabilities are identified.” (Students with Disabilities Working Group, 2010, p. 5).
  6. 6. The Department of Education and Training inQueensland recognises the following six disabilitycategories:•Autism Spectrum Disorder•Hearing Impairment•Intellectual Impairment•Physical Impairment•Speech-Language Impairment•Vision Impairment (Queensland Government, 2012b).
  7. 7. l Hear Learnin iona ing I g Diffic mo t s m paire ulties ial/E ultie d Soc iffic D r Vision Im Disorde pairment S pectrum Autism ESL Stu dentsPhys ica l Imp airm Indige ent no us Stu d dents I mpaire ctually Intelle Issues Speech-Langu Health a ge ImpairmenOther t d Talented Gifted an Be havioural Diff icult ies
  8. 8. Numbers and StatisticsNumber OfStudents with VS Number Special Needs Of Schools
  9. 9. Diffe re ntiat pment io Ongoing Professional Develo n in Plan Tim ning e gy echnolo ti ve TAssis Fundin gSpeci a list A Class ss istanc sizes e itude ice Teacher Att te P re-Serv Adequa aining Tr Diverse Stu Unrealistic expectations dent Need Huma s n and P Resou hysical tal rces l and Men Support Physica ands Dem
  10. 10. • The Teacher is the Key• A Whole School Approach to Inclusion• A Change in Structure• Consistency For All
  11. 11. “Queensland schools are leading innovative improvement processes toward inclusion.” Aniftos & McLuskie, (n.d., p. 2)However there is still much to be done…
  12. 12. “All concerned must now rise to the challenge and work to ensure that Education for Alleffectively means FOR ALL, particularly thosewho are most vulnerable and most in need.” (UNESCO, 1994, p. iv) Thank You
  13. 13. Aniftos, M., & McLuskie, L. (n.d.). On Track Toward Inclusive Education. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from http://www.aare.edu.au/03pap/mcl03296.pdfAustralian Bureau of Statistics (2011). 4221.0 - Schools, Australia. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/lookup/4221.0Main+Features32010?OpenDocumentAustralian Government. (2006). A review of the research to identify the most effective models of practice in early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders: Definition ofTerms. Retrieved September 3, 2012, from http://www.health.gov.au/internet/publications/publishing.nsf/Content/mental-child-autrev-toc~mental-child-autrev-edu~mental-child-autrev-edu-defAustralian Government. (2011). The Nationally Consistent Data Collection - StudentsWith Disability - 2012 Trial. Retrieved August 25, 2012, fromhttp://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Programs/Pages/swdtrial.aspxBourke, P. (2010). Inclusive education reform in Queensland: Implications for policy and practice.The International Journal of Inclusive Education. 14(2), pp. 183-193. Retrieved August 25,2012, from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/14158/1/b14158.pdfCSIE (2010) Index for Inclusion: developing learning and participation in schools. Retrieved August 25, 2012 from http://www.csie.org.uk/publications/inclusion-index-explained.shtml#introDe George-Walker, L., Keeffe, M., Rice, D., Dillon, L. (2010). EDU 5321 Educating Students with Special Needs Study Book. Toowoomba: University of Southern Queensland.Dempsey, I. (2008). Legislation, policies and inclusive practices. In P. Foreman (Ed.), Inclusion in action (2nd ed). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage.Earp, J. (n.d.). A Breeding Ground for Stress and Burnout. Retrieved September 3, 2012, from http://www.ozteacher.com.au/html/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=875:a-breeding-ground-for-stress-and-burnout&catid=1:news&Itemid=26Education Queensland. (1996) Department of Education Manual. Retrieved September 3, 2012, from http://education.qld.gov.au/students/policy/assessment/y2dn/pdfs/hout3_5.pdfFields, B. (2007). Beyond disabilities: broadening the view of special needs and the inclusive education challenges facing primary teachers. In: AARE 2006: Australian Association forResearch in Education Annual Conference 2006: Engaging Pedagogies, 27-30 Nov 2006, Adelaide, Australia.Forbes, F. (2007). Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://www.waespaa.com.au/pdf/SupportForLearning-FionaForbes.pdfForlin, C., Keen, M., & Barrett, E. (2008). The concerns of mainstream teachers: Coping with inclusivity in an Australian context. International Journal of Disability, Development andEducation, 55(3), 251-264.Friend, M., & Bursuck, W.D. (2009). IDEA Disability Categories. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://www.education.com/reference/article/IDEA-disabilities-categories/Gonski, D,. Boston, K., Greiner, K., Lawrence, C., Scales, B., & Tannock, P. (2011). Review of Funding for Schooling – Final Report. Retrieved August 25, 2012, fromhttp://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/ReviewofFunding/Documents/Review-of-Funding-for-Schooling-Final-Report-Dec-2011.pdfIDEAS (2009). How does IDEAS work? Retrieved September 3, 2012, from http://ideas.usq.edu.au/Home/HowdoesIDEASwork/tabid/136/language/en-AU/Default.aspxKeeffee-Martin, M. (2001). Legislation, case law and current issues in inclusion: An analysis of trends in the United States and Australia. Retrieved August 25, 2012, fromhttp://eprints.qut.edu.au/506/1/keeffee_legislation.PDFMcCollow, J. (2012). Queensland Schools Key Statistics in Brief 2012 Update. Retrieved October 1, 2012, from www.qtu.asn.au/publications/statistics/2012-update/NSW Public Schools. (2012). Supporting Students: Disability Programs. Retrieved September 3, 2012, from http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/studentsupport/programs/disability.phpQueensland Government. (2005). Inclusive Education Statement – 2005. Retrieved July 23, 2012 fromhttp://education.qld.gov.au/studentservices/learning/docs/inclusedstatement2005.pdf.Queensland Government. (2012a). Learning and Disability Support. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://education.qld.gov.au/studentservices/learning/index.htmlQueensland Government. (2012b). Educational Adjustment Program. Retrieved August 25, 2012, from http://education.qld.gov.au/students/disabilities/adjustment/faqs/index.htmlQueensland Government. (2012c). Find a School. Retrieved October 1, 2012, from http://education.qld.gov.au/directory/schools/index.htmlRuijs, N.M., & Peetsma, T.D. (2009). Effects of inclusion on students with and without special educational needs reviewed. Educational Research Review, 4, 67-79.Students with Disabilities Working Group. (2010). Strategies to Support the Education of Students with Disabilities in Australian Schools. Retrieved August 25, 2012, fromhttp://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Programs/Documents/SWDWGpaperFinal.pdfUNESCO. (1994). The Salamanca statement and framework for action on special needs education. UNESCO. Retrieved July 25, 2012, fromhttp://www.unesco.org/education/pdf/SALAMA_E.PDF.Winzer, M. & Mazurek, K. (2005). Global agendas in special education: A critique. Educational Practice and Theory, 27(2), 7-24.

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