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FOUNDATIONS
FOR THE FUTURE
OF KNOX
COUNTYApril 2016
Report prepared by
The Ohio State University City and Regional Plannin...
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...............................................................................1
DEMOGRAPHICS...............
4 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 1
This plan begins by discussing the demographics of Knox County. It focuses on ...
2 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 3
Analyzing the people and economy of Knox County was crucial to
creating this r...
4 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
POPULATION DATA
KNOX COUNTY
HANCOCK COUNTY
ATHENS COUNTY
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 5
POPULATION DATA
TOTAL POPULATION 2000
Knox County: 54,500
Hancock County: 71,2...
6 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
POPULATION DATA
*population data based on 2010 Census
MOUNT
VERNON
16,990
CENT...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 7
INDUSTRY DATA
Agriculture,Forestry,H
unting,M
ining
Construction
M
anufacturin...
8 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
INDUSTRY DATA
2005
2007
2009
2011
2013
2014
TAXABLE VALUE OF REAL PROPERTY BY ...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 9
INDUSTRY DATA
TAXABLE VALUE OF REAL PROPERTY BY CLASS OF PROPERTY
(KNOX COUNTY...
10 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 11
TAX DATA
Tax data was gathered from Comprehensive Annual Financial
Reports (C...
12 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
PROPERTY TAX
KNOX COUNTY PROPERTY TAX REVENUE
COMPARATIVE PROPERTY TAX REVENU...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 13
INCOME TAX
COMBINED INCOME TAX REVENUE IN KNOX COUNTY*
COMPARATIVE COMBINED I...
14 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
SALES TAX
KNOX COUNTY SALES TAX REVENUE
COMPARATIVE SALES TAX REVENUE
KNOX
KN...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 15
TOTAL TAX REVENUE
KNOX COUNTY TOTAL TAX REVENUE
COMPARATIVE TOTAL TAX REVENUE...
16 Foundations for the Future of Knox County16 Knox County Background Report
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 17
PROGRAMS ANALYSIS
It is important for Knox County Area Development Foundation...
18 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
PRIVATE
Corporations in Knox County are the main driving forces behind the lo...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 19
GOVERNMENT
An effective local government provides the necessary services that...
20 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 21
SWOT ANALYSIS
Conducting a SWOT analysis allows the Strengths, Weaknesses,
Op...
22 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
SWOT ANALYSIS
STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES
OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
• Community Investme...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 23
STRENGTHS
Knox County has already equipped itself with assets and programs th...
24 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
COMMUNITY INVESTMENT AND INVOLVEMENT
Based off of the interview process, it i...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 25
ATTRACTION & RETENTION STRATEGIES
RELATIONSHIP TIES
REAL ESTATE
DIVERSITY
WEA...
26 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
ENTREPRENEURIAL GROWTH
A large population of young people coupled with a spir...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 27
UNORGANIZED PARTICIPATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Due to the discrepancy betw...
28 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 29
FINANCING TOOLS
The economy of Knox County would be greatly improved by takin...
30 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
FINANCING TOOLS
A bond is an issuance of debt by private or government instit...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 31
FINANCING TOOLS
IMPLEIMPLEMENTATION
Port authorities are the primary bond iss...
32 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
FINANCING TOOLS
Small businesses and start-ups can only be successful if they...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 33
FINANCING TOOLS
Micro-enterprise finance target the smallest businesses in
a ...
34 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
TIF is used to develop areas in need of
improvements to increase economic val...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 35
FINANCING TOOLS
There are four active TIF’s in Knox County, three of
which ar...
36 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
FINANCING TOOLS
Tax credits are federal and state government programs that pr...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 37
SUBHEADINGFINANCING TOOLS
This Unity Center was proposed in 2003 to act as a
...
38 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 39
RECOMMENDATIONS
Knox County displays a strong foundation upon which it can
bu...
40 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
RECOMMENDATIONS
HEIGHTENING HEALTHCARE
Healthcare is one of the biggest indus...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 41
RECOMMENDATIONS
DIRECTION OF DEVELOPMENT
ADF has the potential to become the ...
42 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
RECOMMENDATIONS
ESSENCE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP
ADF should consider creating an e...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 43
LEVERAGING THE LAND
RECOMMENDATIONS
4
Highway access is a pivotal component o...
44 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
RECOMMENDATIONS
COUNTY COLLABORATOR
ADF, as leader of economic development in...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 45
46 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 47
This economic development plan prepared by The Ohio State
University City and...
48 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 49
APPENDIX
The following is an account of businesses and services found within
...
50 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Private:
Ariel Corporation
Jim Buckwald
Address: 35 Blackjack Road Ext, Mount...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 51
Critchfield, Critchfield & Johnston
Clinton G. Bailey
Address: 10 S Gay St, M...
52 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
First-Knox National Bank
Vickie A. Saint
Address: One South Main Street, PO B...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 53
Jeld-Wen
Address: 1201 Newark Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050
Phone:
Email:
Website: ...
54 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Rolls-Royce Energy Systems Inc.
Address: 105 N Sandusky St, Mt Vernon, OH 430...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 55
St. Vincent de Paul
Martha Downs
Address: 206 East Chestnut Street, Mt. Verno...
56 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Danville Local
Dan Harper
Address: W Rambo Street, Danville, OH 43014
Phone: ...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 57
Whispering Hills Care Center
Address: 416 Wooster Road, Mt Vernon, OH 43050
P...
58 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Knox Community Hospital
Sheila Cochran
Address: 1330 Coshocton Rd, Mt Vernon,...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 59
Foster’s Healthmart Pharmacy - Centerburg
Address: 4584 Columbus Rd, Centerbu...
60 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
American Health Network
Dr. WIlliam Elder
Address: 122 Columbus Rd, Fredrickt...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 61
County Commissioners
Teresa Bemiller
Address: 117 E. High Street Ste 161, Mt....
62 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
OhioMeansJobs Knox Center
Address: 17604 Coshocton Road, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 63
Rumpke Recycling
Address: 301 Columbus Road Mt. Vernon OH 43050
Phone: 740-39...
64 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Mayor
Alan Kintner
Address: 2 E. Sandusky St., Fredericktown, OH 43019
Phone:...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 65
4-H Youth Development
Kathy Gamble
Address: 160 Columbus Road Mt Vernon OH 43...
66 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
Dan Emmett Music & Art Festival
Luconda Dager
Address: 107 S Main Street Mt V...
Foundations for the Future of Knox County 67
YMCA
Craig Feeney
Address: 103 North Main Street Mt. Vernon Ohio 43050
Phone:...
Knox_County_Report
Knox_County_Report
Knox_County_Report
Knox_County_Report
Knox_County_Report
Knox_County_Report
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Knox_County_Report

  1. 1. FOUNDATIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF KNOX COUNTYApril 2016 Report prepared by The Ohio State University City and Regional Planning Economic Development Studio for the Area Development Foundation of Knox County
  2. 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...............................................................................1 DEMOGRAPHICS.........................................................................................3 POPULATION DATA...........................................................................................................4 INDUSTRY DATA.................................................................................................................7 TAX DATA....................................................................................................11 PROPERTY TAX.................................................................................................................12 INCOME TAX.....................................................................................................................13 SALES TAX...........................................................................................................................14 TOTAL TAX REVENUE....................................................................................................15 PROGRAMS ANALYSIS.............................................................................17 SWOT ANALYSIS.........................................................................................21 STRENGTHS.......................................................................................................................24 WEAKNESSES.....................................................................................................................25 OPPORTUNITIES...............................................................................................................26 THREATS.............................................................................................................................27 FINANCING TOOLS...................................................................................29 BONDS..................................................................................................................................30 ACCESS TO CAPITAL.......................................................................................................32 TAX INCREMENT FINANCING.....................................................................................34 TAX CREDITS.....................................................................................................................36 RECOMMENDATIONS...............................................................................39 HEIGHTENING HEALTHCARE.....................................................................................40 DIRECTION OF DEVELOPMENT..................................................................................41 ESSENCE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP.............................................................................42 LEVERAGING THE LAND...............................................................................................43 CONCLUSION.............................................................................................47 APPENDIX...................................................................................................49 AUTHORS.....................................................................................................70 TABLE OF CONTENTS
  3. 3. 4 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  4. 4. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 1 This plan begins by discussing the demographics of Knox County. It focuses on subjects such as population, age cohorts, and educational attainment. Next it investigates tax data from 2000 through 2014 in order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the county's current state. This section includes information about property, sales, and income taxes as well as the value of different types of property in Knox County. During the research phase an effort was made to find any and all programs that could be of benefit to Knox County. Nearly 100 programs were discovered in government, private, health, education, and community sectors. A list of these programs is available in the appendix. This information, combined with information collected from stakeholder interviews, lead to the creation of a SWOT analysis. This is a common type of analysis done to evaluate a community's Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. This analysis will help the Area Development Foundation determine where its focus needs to be in the county. The next section of the plan contains information on economic development tools that Knox County could benefit from implementing. These tools consist of bond financing, access to capital programs, tax increment financing, and tax credits. Each of these tools has unique implementation possibilities that can greatly enhance Knox County’s economy. The final section of the report contains recommendations for the future. These recommendations are the most exciting part of the plan. They range from suggesting the creation of an economic incubator to the expansion of the healthcare industry. This plan was created by the Ohio State University City and Regional Planning Economic Development Studio under the direction of Tobias Rittner, President and CEO at the Council of Development Finance Agencies. Knox County (highlighted in orange) is a vibrant rural county located about 35 miles northeast of Columbus. It is home to a robust industrial sector, top of the line healthcare facilities, and an impressive agricultural base. The Area Development Foundation of Knox County has commissioned this plan to create a goal for the future of the economy of Knox County. In this plan there will be discussions of how the county is now and how it needs to adapt to continue its success into the future. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  5. 5. 2 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  6. 6. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 3 Analyzing the people and economy of Knox County was crucial to creating this report. It is important to compare data from Knox County with other similar counties in order to put it into perspective. Athens and Hancock were selected as the county’s to compare to as the three counties have similar populations, a rural nature, colleges, and are located in close proximity to major urban centers. Demographic data for these counties was collected from the U.S. Census Bureau’s online database. The population in all three of the counties analyzed has been increasing at a similar rate. However, the population distributions throughout the counties are vastly different as Knox County has a significantly smaller proportion of their population in the 15-34 age range and a significantly larger proportion over 60. Each of the counties analyzed has a lack of racial diversity with over 90 percent of their populations classifying as white. All three counties have experienced a decrease in the percentage of their population with a GED, but an increase in the percentage with a bachelor’s degree. The 3 counties have also experienced a shift in the housing market with a growing number of people renting versus purchasing houses. Knox County specifically has experience a 5 percent drop in homeownership rates since 2000. Employment numbers are positive for the county. Knox County's unemployment has consistently been lower than the 2 comparable counties. When comparing employment numbers it was discovered that Knox County has an advantage in healthcare, agriculture, and construction. DEMOGRAPHICS
  7. 7. 4 Foundations for the Future of Knox County POPULATION DATA KNOX COUNTY HANCOCK COUNTY ATHENS COUNTY
  8. 8. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 5 POPULATION DATA TOTAL POPULATION 2000 Knox County: 54,500 Hancock County: 71,295 Athens County: 62,223 TOTAL POPULATION 2010 Knox County: 60,921 Hancock County: 74,782 Athens County: 64,757 TOTAL POPULATION 2014 Knox County: 61,063 Hancock County: 75,290 Athens County: 64,840 2000 2010 2014 KNOX KNOX KNOX HANCOCK HANCOCK HANCOCK ATHENS ATHENS ATHENS
  9. 9. 6 Foundations for the Future of Knox County POPULATION DATA *population data based on 2010 Census MOUNT VERNON 16,990 CENTERBURG 1,773 GAMBIER 2,391 HOWARD 5,617 FREDERICKTOWN 2,493 ATHENS 23,832 ALBANY 828 COOLVILLE 496 NELSONVILLE 5,392 FINDLAY 41,202 FOSTORIA 13,441 ARLINGTON 1,455 BLUFFTON 4,125 KNOX COUNTY HANCOCK COUNTY ATHENS COUNTY
  10. 10. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 7 INDUSTRY DATA Agriculture,Forestry,H unting,M ining Construction M anufacturing W holesaleTradeRetailTrade Transportation/W arehousingInform ation Finance,Insurance,RealEstate,Rental Professional,M anagem ent,Scientific Education,H ealth Care,SocialServices Arts,Entertainm ent,Rec,Accom odations,Food Service O therServices PublicAdm inistration 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY (2014) PERCENTAGEOFWORKFORCE INDUSTRY KNOX HANCOCK ATHENS OHIO
  11. 11. 8 Foundations for the Future of Knox County INDUSTRY DATA 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2014 TAXABLE VALUE OF REAL PROPERTY BY CLASS OF PROPERTY (KNOX COUNTY) $900,000,000 $800,000,000 $700,000,000 $600,000,000 $500,000,000 $400,000,000 $300,000,000 $200,000,000 $100,000,000 $0 KNOX COUNTY RESIDENTIAL AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL MINERAL 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2014
  12. 12. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 9 INDUSTRY DATA TAXABLE VALUE OF REAL PROPERTY BY CLASS OF PROPERTY (KNOX COUNTY) 2007 2011 2013 2014 2009 2005 RESIDENTIAL AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL MINERAL 67% 62% 67% 71% 70% 70% 22% 18% 17% 28% 22% 17% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 8% 8% 8% 9% 9% 10%
  13. 13. 10 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  14. 14. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 11 TAX DATA Tax data was gathered from Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports (CAFRs) from the counties, and various audits filled by the many cities and villages. Data on property, income, and sales tax revenues show variance from year to year which reveals changes in the economic condition and development of the region. Property tax in Ohio is distributed to cities and public schools for use. Taxes collected are representative of the appraised value of property in each county. Income tax is distributed to city and state governments, and reveals the quality and quantity of employment in the county. Sales tax is distributed to county governments, and will be higher with a strong commercial economy. Analyzing the data from the audits showed that Knox County has the lowest sales tax income as well as a significantly lower per capita tax base than similar counties. Property values showed that Knox County has an advantage in agriculture, but has seen a decline in the value of commercial and residential property.
  15. 15. 12 Foundations for the Future of Knox County PROPERTY TAX KNOX COUNTY PROPERTY TAX REVENUE COMPARATIVE PROPERTY TAX REVENUE KNOX HANCOCK ATHENS
  16. 16. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 13 INCOME TAX COMBINED INCOME TAX REVENUE IN KNOX COUNTY* COMPARATIVE COMBINED INCOME TAX REVENUE* *Only cities can collect income taxes. Graphs display combined totals for income tax collected by cities in each county. KNOX HANCOCK ATHENS
  17. 17. 14 Foundations for the Future of Knox County SALES TAX KNOX COUNTY SALES TAX REVENUE COMPARATIVE SALES TAX REVENUE KNOX KNOX HANCOCK ATHENS
  18. 18. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 15 TOTAL TAX REVENUE KNOX COUNTY TOTAL TAX REVENUE COMPARATIVE TOTAL TAX REVENUE KNOX KNOX HANCOCK ATHENS
  19. 19. 16 Foundations for the Future of Knox County16 Knox County Background Report
  20. 20. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 17 PROGRAMS ANALYSIS It is important for Knox County Area Development Foundation to be aware of the numerous entities available throughout the county for future partnerships in development plans. The programs analysis found over one hundred entities in the sectors titled private, education, health, government, and community. These entities were discovered through the background research of Knox County and were decided to have value to the Knox County Area Development Foundation. Each entity was then broken down even further into subcategories that help define their benefits to Knox County as a whole. A list of these entities including their name, contact information, and a description is located in the appendix.
  21. 21. 18 Foundations for the Future of Knox County PRIVATE Corporations in Knox County are the main driving forces behind the local economy of the area. Many of the corporations in the area are grouped into commercial or industrial sectors. The entities within the sectors allow potential suitors to have easy access to infrastructure technology needed to quickly initiate operations. Any potential entrepreneur or business interested in the area will have the tools and technology needed to immediately begin operations. The industrial climate is strong in the county, serving many successful corporations highlighted by Ariel Corporation, Rolls-Royce Energy Systems, and Burch Hydro. EDUCATION Colleges, Technical Schools, Vocational programs, High Schools, Middle Schools, Elementary, and Preschool education are readily available in Knox County. Providing many educational options makes the county attractive to prospective residents. By satisfying the educational needs of the families in the area, it becomes easier to keep workers and businesses in Knox County. Providing competitive education options better prepares residents for an opportunity in the future. Having an educated workforce pool will make it easier for prospective businesses to draw from the crop of regional talent without having to outsource their workforce. Kenyon College, Central Ohio Technical College, and Mount Vernon Nazarene University lead the way in Knox County and can create a pipeline between the educational sector to the business sector. HEALTH It is important to provide medical care for any person’s livelihood. This is especially the case in Knox County with its rather aging population. Throughout the county, there is a variety of programs available to treat each community member’s specific need. This is an attractive qual- ity to have when the endgame to entice business and workers is a high priority. Mid-Ohio Corporate Care, Knox Community Hospital, and Alcohol and Drug Freedom Center, are strong examples of professional care which is readily available to Knox County residents. PROGRAMS ANALYSIS
  22. 22. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 19 GOVERNMENT An effective local government provides the necessary services that ensure businesses are able to run their operations smoothly. Knox provides necessary services for which businesses with- in the county are able to focus on bringing wealth to the area. This encourages prospective business to move their operations to the county. Knox County Auditor’s Office, Treasurer, and County Planning Commission are the legal entities available for prospective businesses to utilize within the county. Making these services readily available is key to not only attracting businesses but retaining them. COMMUNITY Knox County is no stranger to providing festivals within every town in the county. Through- out the year, there are social activities for residents of the county. Current and future residents tend to stay in areas where they feel socially and professionally satisfied. This holds true in Knox County as there are no shortage of festivals, fairs, and other social gatherings to enjoy. Furthermore, the county does well to build up the historical context of the area, through mu- seums and historic preservation. The Knox County Fair, Area Development Foundation and the Heritage Centre Association are among many organizations striving to provide experiences within the county, targeting residents satisfaction and support. PROGRAMS ANALYSIS *Please refer to the Appendix for a comprehensive list and description of entities and services.
  23. 23. 20 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  24. 24. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 21 SWOT ANALYSIS Conducting a SWOT analysis allows the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats of a community to be exposed. Strengths are what a community is successful at. Weaknesses are things that the a community needs to improve upon. Opportunities are areas that the a community should consider investing in. Threats are both real and perceived things that have the capacity to harm a community. This SWOT analysis was conducted by speaking with county officials, business owners, and other key organizational leaders that were identified as having valuable knowledge and opinions of the current economic conditions in Knox County. Eighteen of these stakeholders were interviewed either over the phone or via email. Their responses were combined with tax and demographic data in order to complete the analysis.
  25. 25. 22 Foundations for the Future of Knox County SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS • Community Investment and Involvement • Higher Education • Good Financial Base • Market Proximity and • Entrepreneurial Growth • Available Land and Real Estate • Rural Character • Expanding Healthcare Division • Unorganized Participation in Economic Development • Little Diversity in Industry • Perceptions of Knox County • Attraction and Retention Strategies • Relationship Ties • Real Estate • Diversity SWOT Industrial Resources
  26. 26. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 23 STRENGTHS Knox County has already equipped itself with assets and programs that make the county attractive to development. The strong presence of community involvement is an important resource for development and contributes to a high quality of life. Knox County performs especially well in terms of higher education and job training that lead to a capable workforce face with low unemployment. The county also has access to the resources necessary to successfully conduct a robust manufacturing sector. WEAKNESSES Adjustments in programming and the creation of new programs could maximize the county’s capacity for development and strengthen any existing inefficiencies. Knox County lacks proper infrastructure that supports trade and transportation for industry. The real estate market is also limited in terms of available commercial and residential properties. Perceptions within and around the county may inhibit further expansion and development. The county currently relies on few employers and a single economy. Similar industries that are not diversified lead to a workforce that is not resilient to economic changes. OPPORTUNITIES The current conditions of the local economy provide chances for both improvement and growth. The entrepreneurial spirit should be nurtured to encourage the growth of small businesses. Unused vacant land and the untapped real estate market are places for new development. The reutilization of existing local assets such as tourism and health care would make Knox County an appealing place for new residents. THREATS Knox County should be concerned with disjointed participation, lack of economic diversity, and image that could harm the potential for future economic development. Improving the county’s cohesiveness in economic goals across key players and residents will assist in developing towards a single goal. Relying on one primary industry sector and providing workforce training singularly focused on this industry provides little resilience. The county’s image is crucial when working to attract both economic opportunity and new population with its development efforts. S W O T
  27. 27. 24 Foundations for the Future of Knox County COMMUNITY INVESTMENT AND INVOLVEMENT Based off of the interview process, it is evident that the residents of Knox County take great pride in their communities. In order to preserve their historic downtown areas and maintain the quality of life, Knox County residents are committed to taking ownership and repairing any blight. Vacant, abandoned and deteriorating properties are managed so that the character of the neighborhoods is not compromised. This type of commitment to community’s history represents a sense of collaboration that sets an example for towns throughout the county. A philanthropic spirit has also manifested itself in the local companies and businesses who have helped plan and fund many local events. The willingness of local businesses to support the community is a very positive influence on community development. Local events such as the many town festivals contribute to the county’s character while provide opportunities for residents to come together and celebrate Knox County. HIGHER EDUCATION Knox County provides ample access to multiple forms of higher education that prepare residents and young adults to contribute to the local economy. Institutions such as the two major technical schools (Central Ohio Technical College [COTC] and Knox County Career Center) and two private universities (Mount Vernon Nazarene University and Kenyon College) are primary examples. COTC offers associate degree and certificate programs for high-tech skills necessary in the industrial workforce. The Knox County Career Center offers flexible adult education and high school programs that both aim to meet community training needs. Mount Vernon Nazarene University, a private, Christian college, focuses on providing students with a prestigious liberal arts education. Kenyon College in Gambier is also a liberal arts college boasting a traditional arts and sciences education. GOOD FINANCIAL BASE Knox County boasts a strong economic base with lower unemployment rate. Knox County employs 30,324 people with a 4.1% rate of unemployment, as compared to 5.2% statewide. This low rate is a sign of a robust economy with consistent jobs, strong business management, and a hardworking population. In addition to the strong industrial economy, the people of Knox County exemplify a spirit of entrepreneurship. This entrepreneurship is tied to the desire to provide for their community through a localized business focus. MARKET PROXIMITY AND INDUSTRIAL RESOURCES Knox County is capable and equipped to house more industries and firms in the county. Proximity to Columbus allows Knox County to benefit from the state capital’s economy as well. Being so close to Columbus is valuable for locating industry. A rail line that runs from Mount Vernon to Newark provides an essential way to transport large quantities of goods. Knox County provides many natural resources such as bountiful farmland and access to water that can be necessary for many types of manufacturing. The long-standing and thriving agricultural industry already present in Knox County proves as a reliable sector of the economy. COMMUNITY INVESTMENT & INVOLVEMENT HIGHER EDUCATION GOOD FINANCIAL BASE MARKET PROXIMITY & INDUSTRIAL RESOURCES STRENGTHS S W O T
  28. 28. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 25 ATTRACTION & RETENTION STRATEGIES RELATIONSHIP TIES REAL ESTATE DIVERSITY WEAKNESSES ATTRACTION & RETENTION STRATEGIES With a growing need to attract business and industry, the county must find successful strategies to bring new industry in the area. Establish other assets that will keep new companies in the county while retaining existing businesses should be prioritized as well. The county lacks a roadway at a large enough scale to support the transportation of resources and goods for manufacturing. The rail line that connects Mt. Vernon to exchanges in Newark is currently underused. Knox County relies solely on a number of large employers, which makes the entire economy extremely susceptible to economic downturn. The lack of resources for small businesses does not appropriately encouraging the spirit of entrepreneurship throughout the community. The workforce in the county is very strong in terms of supplying the need for manufacturing and industry, but training and development of workers for a more professional, higher-level workforce is lacking. RELATIONSHIP TIES A cohesive network of working relationships between county leadership, businesses, and organizations at all scales is essential for effective county-wide development. Several survey responses have indicated differing impressions or perceptions of the county. These differences point to a lack of effective communication of information and discussion of issues between important actors in the area. Opposition to certain manufacturing due to contrasting opinions of industry and county needs may be a barrier to further industry development. Without mediation of conflicts and possible impediments to increasing the number of industrial sites, the county may lose valuable business opportunities. Public opposition to industrial development has also played a role in Knox’s loss of manufacturing opportunities. REAL ESTATE Adequate residential and commercial real estate are essential to the county’s goals of attracting high-quality employees as well as an increased industrial presence. The availability of affordable housing in Knox County is limited and does not meet the current population’s needs. The real estate market lacks organizational structure (i.e. an identifiable person or company from whom to purchase land), as evident in respondents expressing difficulty with purchasing commercial property. DIVERSITY A resilient and sustainable economy requires a diverse mix of business sectors that span several industries. The county is not completely prepared for economic changes because it depends on few economic drivers. A diverse economy requires an equally diverse workforce to satisfy different employment needs. Knox County needs to improve on a more diverse set of a skilled workforce to become more attractive to potential businesses. The workforce should be trained and prepared to occupy a diverse set of occupations, not solely manufacturing. S W O T
  29. 29. 26 Foundations for the Future of Knox County ENTREPRENEURIAL GROWTH A large population of young people coupled with a spirit of entrepreneurship creates potential for growth in the local small-scale economic market. in the county’s colleges, there is potential for these skills to be turned into economic growth. Increased and developed investment opportunities and finance programs available to those who are interested, will facilitate the expansion of local businesses and encourage more start-ups. These small businesses will increase the diversity of the economy, thus making it more resilient. Small businesses could provide a great number of jobs and training opportunities. AVAILABLE LAND AND REAL ESTATE Knox County’s vacant land is well-suited for new development and investment. A variety of vacant sites can be reutilized and developed into assets for expanding the economy and benefiting the community. Open land with proper infrastructure and utilities already in place will be a valuable feature to attract new business and higher paying jobs to Knox county. The limited commercial real estate offers an opportunity for the county to invest in a new section of the industry that expands the available real estate market and stock. RURAL CHARACTER The people of Knox County enjoy the rural quality of life in the county. Knox County offers a close-knit community that is conveniently situated outside of Columbus. Preserving the rural nature of Knox County can be helpful in attracting potential incoming residents. Outdoor activity tourism, such as hiking, fishing, biking, etc., can be very successful in creating an interesting image of the county by providing a reason for people to come to Knox County. The beautiful natural scenery provides opportunities for new developments such as riverfront businesses that provide a more quality and scenic workplace. Using the natural character of Knox County can be beneficial to attract new businesses, new residents, and help retain the current population. EXPANDING HEALTHCARE DIVISION Providing a healthcare service to accommodate a growing heroin problem would be very valuable to the community. The hospital can provide a large amount of jobs in a single network, which could be a huge impact on not only the economy but also the quality of life in the communities through improved public health and provision of community services and programming. A more developed network of healthcare facilities can bring in more jobs to the area at multiple sites, improve public health and quality of life, attract more people with better neighborhoods, and address issues in the community; therefore, it could make Knox County a more desirable to place to work and live. ENTREPRENEURIAL GROWTH AVAILABLE LAND AND REAL ESTATE RURAL CHARACTER EXPANDING HEALTHCARE DIVISION OPPORTUNITIES S W O T
  30. 30. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 27 UNORGANIZED PARTICIPATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Due to the discrepancy between the preservation of the rural beauty and the urban growth, Knox County does not have a clear goal for the county’s future. A prime example of this is the “Focus 2100” plan implemented in order to preserve the balance between the rural character of the community and potential development. Much of the county wants more development, however, the majority of those who support development also did not want it to affect their standard, highly rural quality of life. The notion of boosting the economy is consistently in direct competition with preserving the quiet, and private standard of living that has been established throughout most of the county. Contrasting goals for the future of the county make establishing and achieving county-wide goals difficult. LITTLE DIVERSITY IN INDUSTRY Little to no diversity in Knox County’s businesses and general population poses a risk in the county’s ability to respond to potential economic recession. Knox County relies on a few major industrial employers such as Siemens Energy and Aerial Corporation, which shows a strength in the energy industry. However, the economy should not depend on only a limited number of industries should one of those industries begin to decline, become obsolete, or leave the area. There is a need to diversify the workforce of the county as a resource for the diverse industries and businesses that Knox hopes to attract. Additionally, the county’s aging population coupled with an out-migration of ages 20-29 indicate a lack of growth and retention of residents. This poses a threat to the community as the workforce is aging and the young workforce is choosing to work outside of Knox County. PERCEPTIONS OF KNOX COUNTY It is crucial to look at the community from the perspective of companies and the potential workforce who have no previous background knowledge of the area, as they are the targeted groups to attract to the county. Two major perceptual issues, weakness in certain school districts and drug use, are of concern for the county. There is perceptual discrepancies surrounding the strengths and weaknesses in the school districts, indicating a lack of communication and knowledge across the county. The negative image of the schools and the potential drug use problem creates a misrepresentation for the great sense of community and quality of life for Knox County’s residents. UNORGANIZED PARTICIPATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LITTLE DIVERSITY IN INDUSTRY PERCEPTIONS OF KNOX COUNTY THREATS S W O T
  31. 31. 28 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  32. 32. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 29 FINANCING TOOLS The economy of Knox County would be greatly improved by taking advantage of economic development tools. There are many of these tools in existence, but there are 4 specific tools Knox County could benefit from the most. First Knox County could use bonds. A bond is an issuance of public or private debt that is to be repaid in the future. They are typically used to fund larger projects such as infrastructure. Second Knox County could create access to capital programs. These are programs targeted towards small businesses and entrepreneurs that have difficulty securing traditional forms of funding. Third Knox County could benefit through the creation of new Tax Increment Finance (TIF) districts. A TIF district is an area established where development is expected to increase property values, it does not involve an increase in tax rates. The increment is the difference between property taxes collected before and property taxes collected after development. The increment is used to cover the costs of the development. Finally Knox County could benefit from implementing tax credits. These are reimbursements of taxes that companies are able to earn.
  33. 33. 30 Foundations for the Future of Knox County FINANCING TOOLS A bond is an issuance of debt by private or government institutions that is to be paid off at a future date. Private bonds consist of debt issued by corporations and investors with varying goals. Government Bonds come in 2 types. First there are general obligation bonds. These are bonds that are paid off from the general fund of a government body. Second, there are revenue bonds. These are bonds that are paid off by a specific revenue stream. There are several agencies in Ohio that can issue bonds including the State Treasurer and the Ohio Public Facilities commission. Bonds allow governments to invest in more expensive projects such as infrastructure and economic development without having to wait to save up for them. Cities and Counties in Ohio can also participate in this bond market. They primarily do this through the use of a Port Authority. BONDS Industrial Development Bonds (or IDB’s) are a form of private activity bond that look like municipal bonds since they are issued by a government entity. They allow manufacturing companies to benefit from a government institution’s tax exempt status to finance their industry projects. IDB’s can be used to purchase new equipment, renovate facilities, or catalyze growth. They are currently the most utilized bond tool for manufacturing industry. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT BONDS Aggie bonds offer farmers loans at below market interest rates. They are primarily supplied by local private entities and offer first-time farmers rates that are on average 3% lower than the commercial farm loan rate. The liability for the loans are solely on the lenders, therefore the state and federal government cannot take part on the loan. The private nature of these loans removes the risk involved from government entities and does not impact the government's debt limit. A 501(c)(3) bond is a non profit bond established for tax exempt charitable organizations. Interest on these bonds is exempt from federal and state income tax. 501(c)(3) bonds can be used to build things such as hospitals, charter schools, and churches. They may also be used to test for public safety. TYPES OF BONDS ►SUMMIT COUNTY The Development Finance Authority of Summit County has successfully issued tax exempt Industrial Development Bonds to finance manufacturing projects such as Exal Corp’s 170,000 ft plant expansion and the updated Superior Roll Forming facility. ►UTAH Utah has utilized the Industrial Facilities and Development Act to expand IDB project eligibility to cover financing for energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy systems. ►IOWA AGGIE BONDS Iowa has the largest Aggie Bond program in the nation. Aggie Bonds may be used to purchase productive agricultural farmland and new or used depreciable agricultural property such as livestock or farm machinery. WHAT ARE BONDS? AGGIE BONDS 501c3 BONDS EXAMPLES
  34. 34. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 31 FINANCING TOOLS IMPLEIMPLEMENTATION Port authorities are the primary bond issuers in the state of Ohio and each of the bonds found below requires an authority to issue them. A port authority is a unit of government created by a city, township, or county. It is governed by a board of directors with the ultimate goal of economic development. Port authorities are allowed to issue bonds anywhere in the state, but are generally focused on a specific area. Bond financing will make the County more favorable to businesses looking for somewhere to locate. Industrial Development, Agricultural, and 501(c)(3) bonds should be the primary focus for bond financing projects in the county. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT BONDS Knox County can utilize IDB’s to help improve existing industrial facilities and attract new manufacturing companies to the county. IDB’s would allow Knox flexibility to finance both traditional and more ancillary industries such as technology and research-based endeavors. AGGIE BONDS Before being able to issue Aggie Bonds the state run First Time Farmer Aggie Bond program must be reinstated. Once reinstated it will be possible to begin writing bonds for the county and potentially the state. This will benefit the county by helping to expand farming and further utilize farmland already in use. Using these bonds will allow younger farmers to get involved in the industry. 501c3 BONDS Knox County can use 501(c)(3) bonds to improve many nonprofit organizations in the county. First these bonds should be used to expand the healthcare industry. This is one of the county's biggest strengths, but money needs to be made available to the industry in order to keep it competitive in the long term. The second major place to implement 501(c)(3) bonds is in the physical improvement of schools. Finally this type of bond should be used to construct community centers such as YMCA’s. This will work to improve the quality of life of residents and can make the county more appealing to companies looking to relocate. The county is currently utilizing bonds to fund several projects as they have over 9 million dollars in general obligation debt outstanding. This is being used to fund the Department of Jobs and Family Services, repair Columbus road, improve the fairgrounds, and upgrade 911 equipment. In addition, the county utilizes over 6 million dollars of financing through the Recovery Zone Economic Development Bond program. This money is being used to improve wastewater systems. The debt created by this project will be paid off from the district's operating revenues. At current there are limited opportunities for private companies to access bond financing in Knox County. Most of the bond issuance in the county is focused on the improvement of government owned general infrastructure. Pursuing bonds for private enterprise will make the county a more appealing location to businesses. BONDS ALREADY EXISTING IN KNOX COUNTY ►OTHER RESOURCES • Port Authorities as an Economic Development Tool for Local Government http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/CDFS-1567 • CDFA Spotlight: The Basics of Industrial Development Bonds http://www.cdfa.net/cdfa/cdfaweb.nsf/ordredirect. html?open&id=july2006tlc.html • GE Capital: Industrial Development Bonds http://www.americas.gecapital.com/financing- solutions/industrial-development-bonds • Cornell University Law School: Industrial Development Bonds https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/26/1.103-7
  35. 35. 32 Foundations for the Future of Knox County FINANCING TOOLS Small businesses and start-ups can only be successful if they have the necessary capital. Many new businesses have trouble finding traditional lenders to provide them capital as they are seen as too risky of an investment. Therefore it is necessary to create alternative means for these businesses to acquire funds. There are many ways to provide these businesses with capital and each operates significantly differently from the next. Below you will find a summary of the best types of access to capital tools that ADF should consider using. ACCESS TO CAPITAL WHAT IS ACCESS TO CAPITAL? CAPITAL PROGRAMS INNOVATION FINANCE ►REVOLVING LOAN FUNDS (RLFS) A Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) is a self replenishing pool of money that is used to make loans. Funds are made available for new loans from the repayment of old ones. RLFs are typically used as a supplement to go along with other sources of funding. They can supply funding options for new businesses that are seen as high risk or unqualified for traditional loans. RLFs assist organizations in becoming financially independent thereby helping them qualify for traditional loans. ►MEZZANINE FUNDS Mezzanine Financing is a combination of debt and equity financing that is used to finance expanding existing companies. Mezzanine financing gives the lender the ability to convert the loan into an ownership share. The loan is typically distributed quickly with little to no collateral on the borrower. ►LOAN GUARANTEES A loan guarantee is a promise by the guarantor to assume debt obligation of a borrower if that borrower happens to default. Arrangements are typically made if the potential borrower is an unattractive candidate for a loan. Government agencies often times take on the responsibility of guarantor by purchasing the debt from a financial lending institution. This allows businesses access to needed financial assistance without creating excessive risk for the lender. Guarantees can either be limited or unlimited, meaning the guarantor can be liable for just a portion or all of the debt. Largely managed by the private sector, innovation financing focuses on providing funds for entrepreneurs and small businesses at various stages of development. ►SEED CAPITAL Seed capital is typically sought after by entrepreneurs or new businesses lacking access to traditional funding sources. These investments allow entrepreneurs to move forward with their new venture. Investments are generally provided by private investors in exchange for a high rate of return on investment (15% - 30%). Seed capital investments are high-risk, but they can be used to capture the attention of venture capitalists. ►VENTURE CAPITAL Venture capital is used by young, growing companies that are already somewhat established. Venture capital firms can be made up of private partnerships, corporations funded by private and public pension funds, endowment funds, individuals, and foreign investments. These investments are high-risk but can yield a high rate of return over five to seven years. The expected return on investment for this particular method is between 25 and 35% per year over its lifespan. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ►504 LOAN PROGRAM The 504 Loan Program funds the purchase of assets such as land, buildings and machinery. 504 loans are funded by a combination of banks and administered by non-profit Certified Development Companies as well as the Small Business Administration and private lenders. ACCESS TO CAPITAL TOOLS
  36. 36. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 33 FINANCING TOOLS Micro-enterprise finance target the smallest businesses in a community. This is often a high-risk investment. ►SBA MICRO-LENDING The Small Business Association (SBA) Micro-Loan Program makes funds available to nonprofit, community based lenders. ►LOCAL MICRO-LENDING Local micro-lending programs are often tailored to address specific niches such as minority-owned and home-based businesses. ►PEER-BASED MICRO-LENDING Peer-based micro-lending occurs when entrepreneurs or small businesses lend to other micro-enterprise businesses. ►CROWDFUNDING Crowdfunding is the practice of funding a project or venture by raising monetary contributions from a large number of people. This is done almost exclusively online. Angel investors are wealthy accredited investors with many years of experience in starting companies, investing in startups, and working in particular industries. Angel investors finance small businesses that are too large to depend on just family and friends but too small to receive venture capital. Angel investments represent a large portion of early-stage financing for small start-up companies. Angels also offer entrepreneurs assistance through networking and advising. Angels can build important credibility for fledgling businesses. Although highly selective, nine out of ten investments are in small start-ups with less than 20 employees. Angel investors can act individually or in group funds. Economic incubators provide entrepreneurs with a space to work on their idea while collaborating with other individuals. They allow entrepreneurs access to education, legal support, and funding. These facilities can get the funds necessary to develop from the US Economic Development Association, however they are typically sustained through private funding. ACCESS TO CAPITAL TOOLS cont. MICRO-ENTERPRISE FINANCE ANGEL INVESTMENTS INCUBATORS Historically, Knox County has not employed many access to capital tools for its local businesses. However, the Area Development Foundation does currently operate a county revolving loan fund. There is ample potential to implement these tools despite there not being a history of using access to capital tools in the county. The Area Development Foundation of Knox County can provide guidance on how access to capital tools may be utilized in the county. The vast majority of access to capital can be geared towards potential start up companies and entrepreneurs that call Knox County home. Other beneficiaries would include micro level enterprises that might not otherwise be approved for financing. The Area Development Foundation should act as a facilitator that brings investors and entrepreneurs together. ADF could be the conduit for investors at all levels that would finance Seed and Venture Capital for Knox County’s local companies. For example, ADF can expand its Revolving Loan Fund program in order to provide more funding for local businesses. ADF could also serve as a guarantor for small business endeavors that require assistance securing loans from lenders. With time, ADF could establish itself as the main hub for catalyzing local investment opportunities. Micro-enterprise finance target the smallest businesses in a community. This is often a high-risk investment.
  37. 37. 34 Foundations for the Future of Knox County TIF is used to develop areas in need of improvements to increase economic value or social capital. TIF is commonly implemented where land is undeveloped, underutilized, or blighted. This means that a vacant, barren area can be financed to prepare it for future development. TIF may also be used to restart previously failed redevelopment efforts, enhance socially depressed areas, or to assist private companies in funding a project. FINANCING TOOLS Tax Increment Finance (TIF) districts are used in areas that are seeking redevelopment. A TIF district is established by an initiating jurisdiction. Once established the district determines the tax increment. This tax increment is the increase in property tax revenue, as a result of increased property values, from the time the district is created until the time it is complete. The increment is then used to reimburse the company that has been used by the city for development. Once the district closes, the increased revenues are returned to the underlying taxed entities as well as the taxpayer. TIF WHAT IS TAX INCREMENT FINANCING? CLOSER LOOK WHO CAN USE TIF WHEN TO USE TIF WHERE TO USE TIF TIF is commonly used by local governments (townships, cities, municipalities, or counties) to redevelop an area of land and take advantage of future tax revenues that are accrued by that redevelopment. The Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA) uses TIF to support Ohio's large and small businesses as they maneuver in the global economy. They assist companies ranging from medium technology companies looking to take the next step and commercialize to first time entrepreneurs establishing a new business. TIFs are typically used for public infrastructure, land acquisition, relocation, demolition, utility construction, debt service, planning costs, and redevelopment. TIF has been used at Easton Town Center in Columbus, OH. Easton is a large multi-use retail complex that includes outdoor and indoor components. Thirty year TIF bonds using 100% of non-school revenues were used to finance the construction of parking structures on the site. TIF was also used in the construction of the Polaris Fashion Mall. Polaris consists of over 1,000 acres of mixed use development that spanning from office, retail, and hotel. It was difficult to create public support for the financing but eventually a non-school TIF was created and revenue flow grew to $1.2 million in 5 years. WHEN, WHERE, & WHY • INDUSTRIAL • ADAPTIVE REUSE • ENVIRONMENTAL • SPECIAL PROJECT • RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL TIF CLASSIFICATIONS:
  38. 38. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 35 FINANCING TOOLS There are four active TIF’s in Knox County, three of which are within the city limits of Mount Vernon, the fourth is in Clinton Township. The first TIF (TIF 131) is a municipal Public Improvement TIF for Coshocton Avenue (State Route 36). This TIF was created on January 25, 1999. Public improvements include pavement widening, construction of storm sewers, installation of new curbing, sidewalks on both sides of the street, expansion of sanitary sewer line, and a detention area for storm runoff. This TIF is set to expire in 2024. The second significant TIF district in Knox county is operating in the Mount Vernon industrial park area (TIF 952). It was created on December 31, 2006. The improvements include transportation and the expansion of sewage and water lines. The debt will be retired in 2029. The third TIF project in Knox County (TIF 1411) was created on December 18, 2012 and runs along the Sandusky Street corridor. The purpose of this district is to improve public infrastructure through utility, streetscape, and landscape improvements as well as environmental studies, demolition and the construction of traffic controls within the boundary of the TIF. The final TIF (TIF 1266) pertains to general public infrastructure improvements in Clinton Township Sites with high development potential often require some initial development before they are ready for businesses to move in. TIF is a great tool to finance this work. The now vacant Mount Vernon Academy site has a large amount of land that could benefit from economic redevelopment. However, this site needs crucial improvements before a business will consider purchasing it. The existing buildings are deteriorated and purchasers do not want to cover the cost of demolition. Creating a TIF district in this area would help finance demolition and contribute to the costs of infrastructure needs for the site such as roads, water, and gas. This work will make the Mount Vernon Academy site more valuable and more attractive for development. Knox County can also expand its usage of TIF beyond infrastructure improvements. A TIF district focused on enhancing Knox’s city centers would spur economic growth. Potential districts would help provide increased retail and entertainment options. Districts financed by TIF that feature both shopping and dining can help keep money local. Renovated downtowns would bring a new energy as well as increased tax revenue to reinvigorate Knox County. KNOX COUNTY TIF DISTRICTS: POTENTIAL IMPLEMENTATION IN KNOX: TIFAPPLICATION IN KNOX COUNTY TAX INCREMENT FINANCING
  39. 39. 36 Foundations for the Future of Knox County FINANCING TOOLS Tax credits are federal and state government programs that provide financing tools for brownfield redevelopment, low-income housing, emerging markets, venture capital, job creation and historic preservation. Tax Credits are tax deductions for investors and can effectively reduce the interest on certain financing packages. They can also be used as a repayment system for investors as an alternative to cash. Tax Credits are flexible, as they have application in urban, rural, and suburban communities. They are able to attract many stakeholders from outside of the market to make a project financially feasible which allows developers to improve their cash flow. It is important to note that during economic downturn tax credits do not disappear. TAX CREDITS WHAT ARE TAX CREDITS? FEDERAL TAX CREDITS HISTORIC PRESERVATION TAX INCENTIVES NEW MARKET TAX CREDITS These incentives were established to preserve older buildings to maintain the flow of capital in older urban areas. The credit is equal to 20% of qualified rehabilitation of a specific certified historic building. Buildings become certified historic structures based on the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. For uncertified historic buildings put in service before 1936, a 10% credit is obtainable. A New Market Tax Credit is financial assistance provided for low-income communities by giving investors state tax credits in exchange for the addition of below-market- rate investment opportunities for Ohio businesses. The intent of these tax credits is to create jobs and improve the overall well being of an area’s residents. Investors receive a 39% tax credit spread throughout seven year period only if they invest in qualified low-income community businesses, facilities, housing or other related opportunities. ►OTHER RESOURCES ►OTHER RESOURCES Understanding the Federal Historic Tax Credit • http://www.nps.gov/tps/tax-incentives.htm • http://www.americanbar.org/news_ practice_area_e_newsletter_home/ preservation.html Applying for the Federal Historic Tax Credit • https://www.nps.gov/tps/tax-incentives/ application.htm Understanding New Market Tax Credits • https://www.cdfifund.gov/programs- training/Programs/new-markets-tax- credit/Pages/default.aspx • http://nmtccoalition.org/fact-sheet/ Apply to Become CDE Certified • https://www.cdfifund.gov/programs- training/certification/cde/Pages/default.aspx
  40. 40. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 37 SUBHEADINGFINANCING TOOLS This Unity Center was proposed in 2003 to act as a provider for services, programming, and recreation for the entire community, but focused on low-income individuals. The Salt Lake City Foundation, a 501(c)3, was created to be the manager of the funds. The project cost a total of $6.8 million and a New Market Tax Credit loan was found for $6.7 million of the project. Highlights: • Community Center • Total Project Cost: $6.8 million • New Market Tax Credit: $6.7 million • Total Jobs: 85 construction, 50 permanent The VNA of Fox Valley Health Center completed an expansion project in 2007 in order to meet an increased demand for health services in the Aurora area. This demand stemmed in part from an increasing senior population as well as a low income patient population of 81%. In order to alleviate the total cost of the expansion, which totaled $6.9 million, a New Market Tax Credit of $1 million was provided to the VNA. Highlights: • Healthcare Facility Expansion • Total Project Cost: $6.9 million • New Market Tax Credit: $1 million • Total Jobs: 10 new permanent The Clendenin School, built in 1912, had been sitting vacant for many years. With an aging population in the area it was decided that the former school would be transformed into a mixed-use facility, housing a health care clinic on the first floor and apartments for senior residents on the first and third floors. The project was finished and opened in 2011. Highlights: • Health care clinic • 18 units of senior housing • Total Project Cost: $5.1 million • Historic Tax Credit: $1 million This is a historic rehabilitation of a five-story brick factory north of downtown Omaha. The unemployment rate is 2.38 times the national rate. It was the first significant reinvestment act in the community in recent years. It was originally built in 1916 as a Ford Motor Company manufacturing factor, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. Highlights • Apartment Complex • Total Project Cost: $24.5 million • New Market Tax Credit: $12 million • Historic Tax Credit used • Total Jobs: 270 construction, 138 permanent The Community Transitional School focuses on providing a stable learning environment and home atmosphere for children who are homeless, in transition, or in chronic poverty related-crises. To help finance their facility, they used the New Market Tax Credit system to acquire $3 million of $3.5 million total cost of the project. Highlights: • School for Homeless Children • Total Project Cost: $3.5 million • New Market Tax Credit: $3 million • Total Jobs: 50 construction, 6 permanent. SORENSON UNITY CENTER: SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH VNA OF FOX VALLEY HEALTH CENTER: AURORA, ILLINOIS CLENDENIN SCHOOL: KANAWHA COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA TIP TOP APARTMENTS: OMAHA, NEBRASKA COMMUNITY TRANSITIONAL SCHOOL: PORTLAND, OREGON EXEXAMPLES of TAX CREDITS
  41. 41. 38 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  42. 42. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 39 RECOMMENDATIONS Knox County displays a strong foundation upon which it can build for the future. The following list of recommendations are based on the information the team found in the analysis of the county. The recommendations are rooted in five different areas of economic development and were created in response to the SWOT and programs analysis. They include utilizing Knox's strength in healthcare, aggregating its economic development processes, bolstering the county's entrepreneurs, taking advantage of the county's natural resources, and fostering relationships within the county.
  43. 43. 40 Foundations for the Future of Knox County RECOMMENDATIONS HEIGHTENING HEALTHCARE Healthcare is one of the biggest industries that the county has at its disposal. The Knox County Community Hospital, along with numerous other care facilities, provides care for many people in the county. These facilities make Knox County a healthcare powerhouse with a high comparative advantage to surrounding counties. It would be beneficial for the Knox County Area Development Foundation (ADF) to become a healthcare hub for the county. ADF could coordinate between different healthcare providers, specifically the Knox County Community Hospital, to find communities in need of a health care center. It could then help these communities build health centers. Healthcare in Knox County is superb and seems to be underutilized considering its strength in the county. The county could benefit from creating a multifunctional public health facility. The facility could address drug issues in the county as well as a lack of critical care facilities. With the county's vast medical resources, this facility could become one of the top rehabilitation centers in the area. The recently for sale Mount Vernon Academy could provide the perfect location for one of these new health facilities. This location is very close to Mount Vernon and already has existing infrastructure. There are several options for financing a large project like this. Tax exempt 501(c)(3) bonds are available for non-profit organizations such as hospitals and rehabilitation centers and charge very low interest rates. The county could also use New Market or Historic Tax Credits. These are all offered at the federal and state level and the county is capable of receiving them. One issue Knox County faces is a scarcity of young professionals. To combat this problem, ADF could work with healthcare facilities in Knox to create more opportunities for this demographic. These facilities could offer opportunities for young professionals to intern or volunteer. ADF could mediate any communication issues that might arise between healthcare employers and these young professionals. ADF could act as a promoter for these facilities by reaching out to young professionals to attract them to the county. The more opportunities that young professionals have to interact and get involved with the county, the more likely they will be to move to the county and stay. Furthermore, a larger workforce would be necessary if Knox County were to create a new rehabilitation center or expand their healthcare facilities in the future. Knox County could also expand its healthcare possibilities by coordinating with the City of Columbus. As a major metropolitan area, Columbus has a lot of access to resources that would be beneficial to Knox County. There are many doctors and medical professionals in Columbus that could come to Knox County to assist with new or expanding health care programs. The county could even reach out to Ohio State to create a partnership with both faculty members and students. In doing so, Knox would become more exposed to both young and experienced professionals who could relocate to the county for job opportunities. Coordination through the city and university would provide Knox County with outside perspective and assistance that would be beneficial to the county’s well being in the long run. 1 A. HEALTHCARE HUB B. DRUG REHABILITATION CENTER C. ATTRACT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS D. CONNECT WITH COLUMBUS
  44. 44. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 41 RECOMMENDATIONS DIRECTION OF DEVELOPMENT ADF has the potential to become the main authority on real estate efforts within the county. There is a substantial void in the county in regards to both identifying and preparing shovel-ready development sites along with standard community real estate. ADF has both the capability and resources to fill this hole by acting as the key player in real estate brokerage in Knox County. Not only would ADF be responsible for identifying the potential real estate sites, the foundation could also link these sites to incoming business interested in relocating to the county. Buyers and sellers would be unified under a consolidated approach provided by ADF. The county could create a port authority and ADF would be tasked with the operations of this body. A port authority could facilitate bond issuance to finance new projects and create financial opportunities for the county. Specifically, the use of industrial development bonds and aggie bonds could be beneficial in expanding Knox’s existing industrial and agricultural bases, respectively. Port authorities can also issue tax exempt bonds that pass on savings to businesses and could promote growth in the county. Additionally, port authorities have the ability to sell and lease publically owned land. If the creation of a port authority is deemed too costly or unnecessary, ADF could look for a partnership with an already existing port authority located nearby in the state as well. Knox County could then still reap the benefits of tax exempt bond financing without having to sustain a port authority of its own. ADF can establish an increased use of Tax Increment Financing in relevant areas of the county. As of now, the use of TIF in Knox County is underutilized as there are only four active TIF districts and three of these are located in Mount Vernon. Vast improvements could be made in the Knox County city centers by creating TIF districts. TIF can be used to catalyze economic growth and finance infrastructure improvements where they are most needed. Other examples where TIF could be applied include any redevelopment of the Mount Vernon Academy site along with improvements to Knox’s industrial parks. Knox County should look into the use of an overlay system to properly identify sites and match them with the appropriate economic tools. Utilizing an interactive GIS map of Knox County would help ADF analyze when the use of certain tax credits may be applicable. For example, the overlay would highlight historic sites that could utilize historic tax credits and also identify those that could use new markets tax credits. Using a traditional planning tool in an innovative way can help developers find potential incentives to build in Knox County. 2 A. COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE B. PORT AUTHORITY C. TAX INCREMENT FINANCING D. OVERLAY SYSTEM
  45. 45. 42 Foundations for the Future of Knox County RECOMMENDATIONS ESSENCE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP ADF should consider creating an economic incubator, a place designed to speed up the growth of new companies and provide startups the necessary resources to get off the ground. A successful incubator provides startups with access to capital, education, and legal support. There is an undeniable entrepreneurial spirit throughout the county, however, there is currently little support for entrepreneurs. Knox County has the potential to set an example in Ohio for how to encourage and support entrepreneurship and in doing so may attract new entrepreneurs to the area. Before constructing an incubator, ADF must first secure funding options and avenues for participants to receive legal and educational support. Funding is crucial to getting a business on its feet. Knox County should create pathways in which its small businesses can access capital. The county could do this by creating a revolving loan fund for home based and small businesses. A revolving loan fund would use principal and interest from old loans in order to fund new loans. Not only are these programs self-sustaining, but they are also a way to get capital for businesses that would not necessarily meet the prerequisites for a loan or might be considered a risky investment. Around 9.4% of Knox County is self-employed and the amount of home-based businesses is unclear. ADF should identify its home based businesses and then survey these to assess their needs. Currently, Centerburg has an online survey that home based business owners can take in order to give input on city’s resources. Knox could expand upon Centerburg’s survey and push the survey out to these businesses.The Knox County Chamber of Commerce also hosts an annual Business Showcase for home based businesses. Knox could expand upon this event by inviting the additional home based businesses identified through the survey. There are five cities in Knox County that assess a municipal income tax. These cities collected 12.5 million dollars of tax revenue in 2013. Knox County should consider instituting a municipal income tax credit in these cities, especially Mount Vernon. Currently, none of these cities are utilizing this tool. A municipal income tax credit can be instituted for two reasons under the Ohio revised code. First, a credit may be issued to businesses that foster new job growth. Second, credits can be implemented to foster job retention. Knox County should focus on the former usage in order to encourage new businesses to locate here. Please visit sections 718.15-718.151 of the Ohio revised code for specifics. 3 A. INCUBATOR/MAKER SPACE B. ACCESS TO CAPITAL C. SUPPORT HOME-BASED BUSINESSES D. MUNICPAL TAX CREDIT
  46. 46. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 43 LEVERAGING THE LAND RECOMMENDATIONS 4 Highway access is a pivotal component of expanding industry in Knox County. The lack of a four-lane highway connecting major cities has been a concern for industrial companies looking to relocate to the area. Knox County should expand roads leading to major highways, in order to promote further industrialization. Creation of a new Tax Increment Finance district would be the most feasible way to successfully expand a highway. Interviews conducted by this studio course indicated that several public figures have cited a lack of highway access was a negative attribute to the county, especially the city of Mount Vernon. This could easily be remedied considering there are multiple TIF districts in the county for infrastructural improvements already. Poverty rates in Knox County have been steadily increasing since 2000. Poverty in 2000 was at 10.1% and has since risen above the state average to 15.5% in 2014. Rising poverty rates create more pressure on the affordable housing market to accommodate vulnerable populations. Currently, affordable housing in the county is not a significant player. As of now, there are only 623 units classified as affordable housing. ADF should partner with Knox Metropolitan Housing Authority, responsible for providing decent, safe, and affordable housing and administering federal housing programs, to expand the inventory of affordable housing to provide for those in lower income brackets as well as the aging population. Housing that is affordable will maintain stability for residents and could reduce abandonment and blight that affect propety values. The 2012 comprehensive plan for Knox County discouraged the county from acquiring and developing agricultural land and instead advocated brownfield redevelopment for any future development projects. Preserving agricultural land will also maintain the hgihly-valued rural quality of life in the county. To build off of this, ADF could use abandoned structures in urban corridors for the distribution of locally-sourced produce and entrepreneurial classifications to include development and research in agriculture. Both of these changes could lead to increased prosperity in the urban economic centers of Knox County by recirculating money throughout the county. Development of this kind could attract a different demographic to Knox County as young professionals tend to be attracted to localized urban social programs. Knox County ranks in the top one-fourth of all Ohio counties in terms of acreage(SCORP). However, the amount of public outdoor recreation acreage in Knox ranks lower than most counties in Ohio at 62 out of 88. By expanding its recreation and cultural opportunities, the county could build upon its strong sense of community and increase tourism. The Ariel-Foundation Park is successful example of reusing abandoned industrial land as a cultural amenity. The park is a site for concerts and festivals, and this model could be replicated in other landscapes across the county. ADF could facilitate collaborations with communities and organizations to establish a mroe diverse set of cultural events for community members and future tourists. A. INFRASTRUCTURE B. AFFORDABLE HOUSING C. AGRICULTURE D. NATURAL RESOURCES
  47. 47. 44 Foundations for the Future of Knox County RECOMMENDATIONS COUNTY COLLABORATOR ADF, as leader of economic development in the county, should market itself to increase its presence and credibility in the economic development community. An increased presence in the county could be expanded by hosting county-wide events, like networking opportunities, to strengthen networks in the community. By establishing mroe connections throughout the county, ADF will be able to expand its impact.These events would advertise ADF’s ability to serve companies in the county, promote awareness of ADF, and increase organization membership. Because ADF is a membership organziation, it should represent and advocate for its members' interests and concerns for future development. In order to maintain awareness of member goals and visions, ADF should regularly and deliberately communicate with its members to assess their needs. ADF could then administer surveys and regular assessments to determine the best areas in which to focus its programming. ADF must prepare to adjust its development activities in order to accomodate for changing economic needs and directions to best support its members. A tax levy would create an additional stream of funding with which ADF is enabled to increase and improve its development activities. Because raising taxes effects everyone, ADF must be transparent about the intended purpose of the money generated by implementing a tax levy and how the money will benefit the whole county. Knox County public school systems is facing competition from homeschooling. Families may opt for homeschooling because there is a lack of trust or misperception about the quality of schools in the county. Public schools have the unique opportunity to make connections and create programs with vocational schools to create a more holistic education experience for their students. For example, Mt. Vernon City Schools have fostered connections with several vocational schools in Mt. Vernon. ADF should assist other public schools in extending these partnerships to better cater to the population and workforce needs. ADF is positioned to be a resource for facilitating partnerships across Knox County. ADF could be a platform to connect interested individuals and organizations to other members in the area for development and new projects. In this way, the foundation could act as a catalyst for change and growth in the county. Additionally, ADF should continue to develop its website in order to update residents and developers alike on development projects and opportunities in the county. ADF should also establish itself as a collector of potential projects and connect players with the right partners in the county. Through ADF, county players can discover new methods and collaborations that could eventually lead to greater projects and goals. 5 A. IMAGE/MARKETING B. COALTION INTERESTS C. TAX LEVY FOR ADF D. PUBLIC SCHOOLS/HOMESCHOOLING E. PARTNERSHIPS
  48. 48. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 45
  49. 49. 46 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  50. 50. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 47 This economic development plan prepared by The Ohio State University City and Regional Planning Studio lays the groundwork to re-establish Knox County’s status as an economic force. The Ohio State and the Area Development Foundation have a strong history of partnership with a planning collaboration on a mid-1960s study that resulted in the creation of the Ariel Foundation Park. It is only fitting that The Ohio State University and ADF come full circle with the current economic development plan. The recommendations set out by the plan encourage strong determination in order for them to be realized. The Area Development Foundation of Knox County should adopt these recommendations to catalyze growth and development for the entire county. Each of these actions implemented by ADF will foster productive relationships, strengthen economic and financial programming, and establish ADF as a partner and leader for Knox County. With a strong sense of community spirit and an impressive existing support structure, Knox County is well positioned to revitalize itself for the 21st Century. CONCLUSION
  51. 51. 48 Foundations for the Future of Knox County
  52. 52. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 49 APPENDIX The following is an account of businesses and services found within Knox County. Information is organized by type of program within the county, and includes contact information, location, website, and a brief description for each entry. When possible a primary contact is provided for further outreach. This appendix has been created to inform the Area Development Foundation about the various organizations which make up the community.
  53. 53. 50 Foundations for the Future of Knox County Private: Ariel Corporation Jim Buckwald Address: 35 Blackjack Road Ext, Mount Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 397-0311 Email: info@arielcorp.com Website: https://www.arielcorp.com/ About: Worlds largest manufacturor of separable reciprocating gas compressors. Alcove Restaurant Address: 116 S Main St, Mount Vernon, Ohio 43050 Phone: (740)-392-3076 Email: info@alcoverestaurant.com Website: http://alcoverestaurant.com/index.php About: Originally and ice cream and candy shop founded in Mt Vernon, the Alcove currently serves as a dining room with charming banquet facilities. AMG Industries David J. McElroy Address: 200 Commerce Drive, Mount Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-397-4044 Email: Website: www.amgindustries.com About: Metal fabricator which supplies its product to the original automotive equipment menufacturers, as well as Tier 2 and Tier 3 suppliers. Brenneman Lumber Mark Bennett Address: 51 Parrott St, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-397-0573 Email: info@brennemanlumber.net Website: http://www.brennemanlumber.com/ About: A Northern Appalachian hardwood lumber company, a a rich tradition of utilizing green and kiln dried lumber. Central Ohio Fabricators Address: 105 Progress Dr, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-2029 Email: Website: http://www.centralohiofab.com/ About: A detailed and high quality manufacturor of industrial racks. APPENDIX
  54. 54. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 51 Critchfield, Critchfield & Johnston Clinton G. Bailey Address: 10 S Gay St, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-397-4040 Email: bailey@ccj.com Website: http://www.ccj.com/ About: A civil practice which actively engages in civic life of the community, with the highest ethical standards. Custom Cutters Address: 8924 Columbus Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 392-1383 Email: Sales@Custom-Cutters.com Website: http://www.custom-cutters.com/ About: A manufacturing company specializing in waterjet cutting and fabrication. Dennis & Schisler, Inc. Kenneth E. Dennis, CPA Address: 206 S Mulberry St # A, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 397-1721 Email: info@dennisandschisler.com Website: http://www.dennisandschisler.com/index.php About: Accounting services offered to large entities, as well as small capabilities for individual needs. ECR Computers, Networks, and Web Design Address: 895 Harcourt Road, Mount Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (877) 392-9246 Email: customersfirst@ecr.net Website: http://ecr.net/ About: Internet Technology support company for business needs. EuroLink, Inc. Mark Hauberg Address: 106 West Ohio Avenue Mount Vernon, Ohio 43050 Phone: (740) 393-4040 Email: sales@eurolinkinc.com Website: http://www.eurolinkinc.com/ About: Importer of European supplies supplying North Americas tooling and distribution sectors. Euro Link offers high quality products in a timely fashion at affordable rates. APPENDIX
  55. 55. 52 Foundations for the Future of Knox County First-Knox National Bank Vickie A. Saint Address: One South Main Street, PO Box 1270, Mount Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 399-5120 Email: vsant@FirstKnox.com Website: https://www.firstknox.com/Pages/default.aspx About: Bank proving financial services including but not limited to personal, business, and investment in Knox County. Flowers-Snyder Funeral Home C. Clay Snyder Address: 619 E High St, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 392-6956 Email: CLAY@SNYDERFUNERALHOMES.COM Website: http://www.snyderfuneralhomes.com/location/flowers-snyder-funeral-home/ About: A funeral home serving Knox County, which believes in the importance of accepting change and celebrating life. Heating & Cooling Products Tony Ellsworth Address: 325 Commerce Dr, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (724) 974-1540 Email: tellsworth@hc-products.com Website: http://www.hc-products.com/ About: A heasting and cooling production manufacturor. Heating and Cooling Products goal is to distribute the highest quality sheet metal products available. Info-link technologies inc Address: 601 Pittsburgh Ave, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: 1.800.239.5989 Email: Website: http://www.infolinktechnologies.net/ About: A provider of computer solutions for education and business, as well as individuals in Knox County. International Paper Address: 8800 Granville Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 397-5215 Email: Website: http://www.internationalpaper.com/ About: A paper-based packager of paper and pulp, which leads the industry globally. APPENDIX
  56. 56. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 53 Jeld-Wen Address: 1201 Newark Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: Email: Website: http://www.jeld-wen.com/ About: High quality designer of windows and doors, providing services for historic renovation, lighthouse restoration, improving livable spaces and window safety at home. First Federal Savings & Loan Centerburg Terry Bumbus Address: 5 E Main St, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740) 625-5392 Email: firstfederal@midohio.twcbc.com Website: http://www.savingsbankcenterburgohio.com/ About: Trusted banking specializing in FDIC insured deposits and mortgage loans in Centerburg Ohio. Burch Hydro Mike & Patty Burch Address: 17860 Ankneytown Rd Fredericktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740)-694-9146 Email: salesbhi@burchhydro.com Website: http://burchhydro.com/ About: Treatment and drying of municipal biosolids and other types of semi-solid sludges. Edwards Culvert Address: 10439 Sparta Rd, Fredericktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740) 694-5096 Email: info@edwardsculvert.com Website: http://www.edwardsculvert.com/index.html About: Oldest independent fabricator of metal culvert pipes in the state of Ohio FT Precision, Inc. Address: 9731 Mt Gilead Rd, Fredericktown, OH 43019 Phone: Email: info@ftprecision.biz Website: http://www.ftprecision.biz/ About: Manfacturor, which accurately machine and assembles combustion engine rocker arms APPENDIX
  57. 57. 54 Foundations for the Future of Knox County Rolls-Royce Energy Systems Inc. Address: 105 N Sandusky St, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 393-8888 Email: Website: http://www.rolls-royce.com/products-and-services/power-systems.aspx About: Production of MTU high speed engines and propulsion systems for ships, oil and gas industry, heavy land, and rail and defense vehicles. Education: Central Ohio Technical College, Knox Campus Dr. Bonnie Coe Address: 236 South Main Street, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 366-9494 Email: bcoe@cotc.edu Website: http://www.cotc.edu/ About: Technical college, part time high school program Knox County Career Center Kathy Greenich Address: 308 Martinsburg Road, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 397-5820 x2254 Email: kgreenich@knoxcc.org Website: http://knoxcc.org About: Vocation District, including a preschool Knox County Career Center - Adult Education Jane Marlow Address: 308 Martinsburg Road, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 393-2933 x1104 Email: jmarlow@knoxcc.org Website: http://adultedkccc.org About: Vocational Adult education program Knox County Career Center - High School Jeff Lavin Address: 306 Martinsburg Road, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 397-5820 x2223 Email: jlavin@knoxcc.org Website: http://knoxcountycc.org About: Vocational High School program APPENDIX
  58. 58. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 55 St. Vincent de Paul Martha Downs Address: 206 East Chestnut Street, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 393-3611 Email: mdowns@cdeducation.org Website: http://www.saintvdpschool.org About: 178 Students Mount Vernon Nazarene University Dr. Henry Spaulding, II Address: 800 Martinsburg Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 392-6868 x4200 Email: henry.spaulding@mvnu.edu Website: http://www.mvnu.edu About: 2,267 Total Students, 242 Employees - 79 Full-time - 163 Part-time Mount Vernon City William (Bill) Seder Jr. Address: 300 Newark Road, Mount Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 397-7422 x6025 Email: bseder@mvcsd.us Website: http://www.mt-vernon.k12.oh.us About: 1 High, 1 Middle, 6 Elementary Centerburg Local Michael Hebenthal Address: 119 S. Preston Street, Centerburg, Ohio 43011 Phone: (740) 625-6346 Email: mike.hebenthal@centerburgschools.org Website: http://www.centerburgschools.org About: 1 High, 1 Middle, 1 Elementary Fredericktown Local Matt Chrispin Address: 117 Columbus Road, Fredericktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740) 694-2956 Email: mchrispin@fredschools.com Website: http://www.fredericktownschools.com About: 1 High, 1 Middle, 1 Elementary APPENDIX
  59. 59. 56 Foundations for the Future of Knox County Danville Local Dan Harper Address: W Rambo Street, Danville, OH 43014 Phone: (740) 599-6116 x3229 Email: dan.harper@danvilleschools.org Website: http://www.danvilleschools.org About: 1 High, 1 Middle, 1 Elementary East Knox Local Steve Larcomb Address: 23201 Coshocton Road, Howard, OH 43028 Phone: (740) 599-7493 Email: slarcomb@ekschools.org Website: http://www.eastknox.k12.oh.us/Domain/1 About: 1 Jr/Sr High, 1 Elementary Kenyon College Joe Klesner Address: 106 College Park Drive, Gambier, OH 43022 Phone: (740) 427-5114 Email: klesner@kenyon.edu Website: http://www.kenyon.edu About: 182 Admin Staff, 1,676 Undergraduates, Oldest private college in Ohio (1824) Health: Mid-Ohio Corporate Care Address: 1490 Coshocton Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-9675 Email: Website: About: Associated with Hospital York Eyecare Associates Address: 1684 Venture Drive, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-6010 Email: Website: http://www.yseyecare.com/contact-us.html About: Services include: Eye evaluation, treatment of eye diseases, and Lasik APPENDIX
  60. 60. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 57 Whispering Hills Care Center Address: 416 Wooster Road, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-397-9626 Email: Website: About: For-Profit Nursing home, 44 beds, 2 star rating Sleep Medicine Clinic Address: 307 Vernedale Drive, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-1112 Email: Website: About: Deals with sleep related illnesses and treatments Alcohol & Drug Freedom Center Address: 106 East Gambier Street, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-397-2660 Email: Website: About: Community outreach programs for women, intensive care, and adolescents. They also have many treatment programs and Medical Assisted Treament. Get’s funding from the county. Fresenius Medical Care Knox County Address: 14 Woodlake Trail, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (800)-881-5101 Email: Website: About: KCH Urgent Care Address: 1490 Coshocton Ave, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740) 393-9111 Email: Website: About: APPENDIX
  61. 61. 58 Foundations for the Future of Knox County Knox Community Hospital Sheila Cochran Address: 1330 Coshocton Rd, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-9601 Email: Website: About: Non-profit hospital, etc..... Center for Rehab and Wellness Address: 3782 Columbus Road, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740)-480-8068 Email: Website: About: Pediatric Specialists Address: 29 North Clayton St, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740)-625-5326 Email: Website: About: Family Medicine Center Address: 4550 OH-229, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740)-253-3003 Email: Website: About: Centerburg Chiroppratic Center Address: 29 North Clayton St, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740)-625-6212 Email: Website: About: APPENDIX
  62. 62. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 59 Foster’s Healthmart Pharmacy - Centerburg Address: 4584 Columbus Rd, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740) 625-7626 Email: Website: http://www.fostersrx.com About: 3 locations: 2 in Mt Vernon, 1 Centerburg. Its a pharmacy... Knox Community Hospital Family Medicine - Centerburg Dr. Ron T. Martinson Address: 4581 Columbus Rd, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740) 625 6234 Email: None Website: https://www.kch.org/care-services/department-primary-care/family-medicine-centerburg About: Knox Community Hospital Family Medicine - Fredericktown Dr. Edward D Blackburn Address: 16361 Village Parkway, Fredricktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740)-399-3863 Email: None Website: https://www.kch.org/care-services/department-primary-care/family-medicine-fredericktown About: Family Medicine, Family & Emergency Medicine Fredricktown Family Practice Dr. Jeffrey Bowers Address: 16361 Village Parkway, Fredricktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740) 694-2110 Email: None Website: About: Hospitalist, Geriatric Practitioner, Family Practitioner Fredricktown Veterinary Clinic Dr. D. Scott Harmon Address: 156 Columbus Rd, Fredricktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740)-694-5926 Email: sharmon@fredvetinc.com Website: http://www.fredvetinc.com About: Vet clinic, work heavily with cattle and equine medicine APPENDIX
  63. 63. 60 Foundations for the Future of Knox County American Health Network Dr. WIlliam Elder Address: 122 Columbus Rd, Fredricktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740)-694-1261 Email: None Website: https://www.ahni.com/Practices/fredericktown/index.html About: Family Medicine, Preventative health, osteopathic, Dr. Elder is a Fredericktown native Mental Health and Recovery of Knox and Licking Address: 1435 W Main St, Newark, OH 43055 Phone: (740) 522 1234 Email: Website: About: Government: Auditor Jonette Curry Address: 117 East High Street, Suite 120, Mount Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-6750 Email: auditor@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/auditor/ About: Chief fiscal officer of the county and tax assesor. Cannot legally audit anyone. That is the role of the Auditor of the State Regional Planning Commission Darrel Severns Address: 117 E. High Street Ste 221, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-6718 Email: regionalplanning@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/rp/ About: Addresses issues larger than a single municipality, Figures out improvements for health, safety and welfare of the residents of Knox County. Clerk of Courts Mary Jo Hawkins Address: 117 E. High Street Ste 201, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-6788 Email: clerkofcourts@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/coc/ About: Finds ways to make the county offices more accountable and accessible to the public. Receives, dockets, indexes, certifies, and preserves county pleadings and court orders among other legal documents. Also serves court papers such as subpoenas. APPENDIX
  64. 64. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 61 County Commissioners Teresa Bemiller Address: 117 E. High Street Ste 161, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-6703 Email: teresabemiller@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/commissioners/ About: Commissioners are the main executive branch of the county. Provides efficient government opportunities for the county as well as promotes strategic development tactics. Thom Collier Address: Phone: Email: thomcollier@co.knox.oh.us Website: About: Roger Reed Address: Phone: Email: rogerreed@co.knox.oh.us Website: About: Department of Jobs and Family Services Matthew Kurtz Address: 117 East High Street, 3rd and 4th Floors, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: Email: jobfam@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/jobfam/ About: Promotes development of employment and economic opportunities for individuals and families within Knox County. Treasurer Shelley Coon Address: 117 E. High St, Suite 103, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-6735 Email: treasurer@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/treasurer/ About: County’s chief investment officer. Duties are similar to the duties of banks including the collection and management of payments and receipts. Keeps track of transactions and balances them with the Auditor on a daily basis. APPENDIX
  65. 65. 62 Foundations for the Future of Knox County OhioMeansJobs Knox Center Address: 17604 Coshocton Road, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-392-9675 Email: Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/employment/ About: Provides resources for and personally assists job seekers and employers including resources for potential careers and training opportu- nities. Chamber of Commerce Carol Grubaugh Address: 400 S Gay St, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-1111 Email: carol@knoxchamber.com Website: http://knoxchamber.com/ About: Represents/promotes the local businesses and economy as a whole while encouraging future business/industrial investment. Provides employment opportunities and is able to broaden the tax base. Mt. Vernon City Council Bruce Hawkins Address: 1365 New Gambier Road, Mt Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-392-8106 Email: bhawkins@mountvernonohio.org Website: http://mountvernonohio.org/departments/council/ About: Legislative body that governs county government. Policy makers Capital City Oil Address: 375 Columbus Road Mt. Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-397-4483 Email: Website: About: Recycling of Antifreeze, gasoline, motor oil, and oil filters. Ross Bros Salvage Inc. Address: 106 Tilden Ave Mt Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-397-9334 Email: Website: About: Recycling of steel, scrap metal,brass, copper, aluminum and batteries. APPENDIX
  66. 66. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 63 Rumpke Recycling Address: 301 Columbus Road Mt. Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-393-2057 Email: Website: About: Recycling of scrap metal,plastic bottles, glass, appliances, cardboard and food cans. US Consolidated Farm Services Agency Kate Mills Address: 1025 Harcourt Road Mt Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-392-0891 Email: Website: http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USFSA/bulletins/ae1df5 About: This agency will provide USDA regulations and financial support for the Knox County agiculture. Knox County Water/Wastewater Sue McNichols Address: 17602 Coshocton Road Mt. Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-397-7041 Email: suemcnichols@co.knox.oh.us Website: http://www.co.knox.oh.us/offices/water/ About: To provide clean water to Knox county and provide proper water waste protection. Mayor Dick Mavis Address: 40 Public Square, Suite 206, Mt. Vernon, OH 43050 Phone: (740)-393-9517 Email: Website: http://mountvernonohio.org/departments/mayor/ About: Mayors have an abundance of responsibilities but generally they oversee all of a town’s operations and advise specific branches as well as the public. Spokesperson for the city council and the general public Mayor Dave Beck Address: 49 1/2 E Main St, Centerburg, OH 43011 Phone: (740)-625-7808 Email: Website: http://centerburgoh.org/mayor.html About: APPENDIX
  67. 67. 64 Foundations for the Future of Knox County Mayor Alan Kintner Address: 2 E. Sandusky St., Fredericktown, OH 43019 Phone: (740)-393-9517 Email: alankintner@fredericktownohio.net Website: http://fredericktownohio.net/ About: Green Machine Recycling Justin Fearn Address: 10439 Sparta Road Fredricktown OH 43019 Phone: 740-694-4677 Email: info@greenmachineshinglerecycling.com Website: www.greenmachineshinglerecycling.com About: To provide recycling for asphalt and shingles aluminum, brick, cardboard, pvc piping, steel, paper and plactic. Mayor Robert Dile Address: 512 Market Street, Danville, OH 43014 Phone: (740)-599-6888 Email: Website: http://www.danvilleohio.org/ About: Ohio House of Representatives Margaret Ann Ruhl Address: 77 S. High St, 11th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215 Phone: (614)-466-1434 Email: Rep68@ohiohouse.gov Website: http://www.ohiohouse.gov/margaret-ann-ruhl About: Representative for the citizens of Knox County, listen to their concerns and relay them to other State representatives to develop effective solutions. This is done through legislative action Community: Collins Country Greenhouse & Farm Market LLC Shawn Collins Address: 7211 Patton Road Mt. Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-392-5647 Email: Collinsfarmmarket@gmail.com Website: http://www.collinscountrygreenhouse.com/contact-us/ About: The sale for fresh produce to support community farmers. Collins also offers commuinty supported agiculture which allow local resi- dents to pay a fee and recieve fresh grown produce throughout the growing season. APPENDIX
  68. 68. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 65 4-H Youth Development Kathy Gamble Address: 160 Columbus Road Mt Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-397-0401 Email: gamble.2@osu.edu Website: http://www.ohio4h.org/ About: 4-H provides life learning skills for kids ages 5 thru 19. OSU Extension Knox County Kathy Gamble Address: 160 Columbus Road Mt Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-397-0402 Email: gamble.2@osu.edu Website: http://extension.osu.edu/ About: OSU provides knox county with 4H programs community support and development for agiculture and natural resources. The Knox County Agricultural Museum Address: 125 Fairgounds Road Mt Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-599-6416 Email: info@theagmuseum.org Website: http://www.theagmuseum.org/ About: This agricultural museum will take you on a trip from the 1800 and 1900. The museum will give you an ideal of what it was like to live as an early settler and history of Knox County. Heritage Centre Association Norita F Hissong Address: 120 South Main Street Mt. Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-393-1481 Email: manager@visitdowntownmountvernon.com Website: http://www.visitdowntownmountvernon.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=8&Itemid=102 About: Heritage is a community organization that promotes economic development in the downtown distict while perserving the historical sites in knox county. They also host a number of festvials and events in the downtown district. Area Development Foundation Of Knox County Jeff Harris Address: 110 East High Street Mt Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: Email: Website: http://www.knoxadf.com/ About: APPENDIX
  69. 69. 66 Foundations for the Future of Knox County Dan Emmett Music & Art Festival Luconda Dager Address: 107 S Main Street Mt Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: 740-392-3378 Email: director@danemmettfestival.org Website: http://www.danemmettfestival.org/ About: The Dan Emmit music festivals started in 1988 by a group of Mt. Vernon Citizen the wanted quality a quality art and music festival. Mt Vernon Christmas Walk & Parade Norita F Hissong Address: 120 South Main Street Mt. Vernon OH 43050 Phone: 740-393-1481 Email: manager@visitdowntownmountvernon.com Website: http://www.visitdowntownmountvernon.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18&Itemid=123 About: Hosted by the Heritage organization. First Friday Mt Vernon Becky Glass Address: 102 South Main Street Mt. Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: 740-399-8004 Email: manager@VisitDowntownMountVernon.com Website: http://www.visitdowntownmountvernon.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=13&Itemid=122 About: Sponored by the chamber of commerce with live entainment food, harvest market and a car cruise in with a petting zoo from May thru October on the first friday of the month. Knox County Fair Address: 601 Fairgounds Road Mt Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: 740-397-0484 Email: knoxcountyfair@yahoo.com Website: http://www.knoxcountyfair.org/index.php About: Knox County fair supports everything from 4H to boys and girls scouts, live music, food, rides and agirculture is the the highlight of the fair for the last 150 years. Kno Ho CO J. Michael Stephen Address: 309 S. Main Street Mt Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: 740-622-9801 x 1014 Email: Website: http://www.knohoco.org/index.php/services/energy-services/emergency-home-energy-assistance About: Kno ho Co is a non profit community out reach center for Knox, Cochoston, and Ashland County. The provied econmonic support to help people in need of finacial and medical assistance. APPENDIX
  70. 70. Foundations for the Future of Knox County 67 YMCA Craig Feeney Address: 103 North Main Street Mt. Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: 740-392-96-22 Email: cfeeney@rrohio.com Website: http://mtvymca.org/ About: The YMCA provides healthly exercise options for the whole famliy. Mid Ohio Regional Council Theresa Vernon Address: 1 Avalon Road #1 Mt Vernon Ohio 43050 Phone: 740-397-4656 Email: support@knoxdd.com Website: http://www.meorc.com/ About: MEORC supports providing services to persons with developmental disability. Heart of Ohio USA Days Diane Payne Address: PO Box 594 Centerburg Ohio 43011 Phone: 740-625-7550 Email: Diana@tradye.com Website: http://www.heartofohiousa.com/about.html About: The Heart of Ohio festival has been in the community for ten years this festival provides entrainment for the whole family. Old Time Farming Festival Dave Hollis Address: PO Box 668 Centerburg Ohio 43011 Phone: 740-392-9022 Email: info@oldtimefarmingfestival.org Website: http://www.oldtimefarmingfestival.org/about_us.html About: Old Time Farming Festival is a agriculture festival that promotes farming this festvial has been in place for the last twenty-four years. Fredricktown Tomato Show Carol Ruggles Address: Phone: 740-694-9010 Email: Website: www.tomatoshow.com About: This will be the fourty year of the tomato festival in Fredricktown. APPENDIX

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