SECTION 10.0

COMMUNICATIONS


10.1 INTRODUCTION
10.2 ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS
10.3 COMMUNICATION IN CRISIS SITUATIONS

10.4...
SECTION 10.0

COMMUNICATIONS
10.1 INTRODUCTION
People generally associate communications on environmental issues with resp...
new ideas.


Options for communicating with members and users on an ongoing basis are as follows:
1. Develop an environmen...
10.3 COMMUNICATIONS IN CRISIS SITUATIONS
A crisis has been defined as "an event that could cause permanent change for your...
1. Develop a Resource File
You should prepare a file of information, which is well organized and readily available to assi...
•   Does the situation run the risk of escalating in intensity?
•   Will the situation be widely reported by the media or ...
10. Assess the Need for External or Expert Assistance
In developing a response to a problem, particularly in the event of ...
Products used are either identical or very similar to those used by homeowners in their lawns and
gardens.


3. Are the pr...
It is not recommended that you simply memorize the above answers. Instead, using the responses
as a basis, develop your ow...
Maintain The Image Of A Good Corporate Citizen
Before releasing your damage control press release, consult your lawyer. Wo...
Notifications Are Made
7. The Incident Commander (Superintendent), or designate, makes the appropriate internal
notificati...
Figure 10.1 Hazardous Material Incident Response Form




2




2
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby Campus – Hazardous ...
10.7 COLLEAGUE EXAMPLE – Saskatoon Golf and Country Club Emergency Response
Contingency Plan



1.) Reportable Quantities
...
3) Notification Procedures

      Immediately contact the Spill Report Center at 1-800-667-7525

      Contact if Applicab...
Pesticide Inventory

November 8, 2005


Trade Name                       Active Ingredient          PCPA Reg #     Qty:


...
Pesticide Cleanup Procedures


   When a spill occurs, regardless of the size of the spill or the amount of pesticide that...
clean up the spill and/or give instructions on measures to be taken.

   -      The spill response team may make an on-sit...
to the wearer. Some dusts or powders, particularly those that are very fine (e.g. Sulfur) may ignite
as easily as gases or...
The preceding information was taken from the Saskatchewan Pesticide Applicator
      Handbook Agriculture Division


Fuel ...
•  Use an accredited firm. Obtain a correctly completed waybill (i.e. a hazardous waste
      transportation manifest).
7....
2010 10
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2010 10

  1. 1. SECTION 10.0 COMMUNICATIONS 10.1 INTRODUCTION 10.2 ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS 10.3 COMMUNICATION IN CRISIS SITUATIONS 10.4 RESPONSES TO COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS 10.5 HOW TO WRITE A PRESS RELEASE IN TIME OF CRISIS 10.6 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONTINGENCY PLAN 10.7 COLLEAGUE EXAMPLE – Saskatoon Golf and Country Club Emergency Response Contingency Plan
  2. 2. SECTION 10.0 COMMUNICATIONS 10.1 INTRODUCTION People generally associate communications on environmental issues with responses to crisis situations such as fires in pesticide storage buildings, spills, fish kills and other major problems. Although communicating effectively when a problem arises is extremely important, maintaining ongoing communications during normal operations, with members and even with the public, is also important. This section outlines ongoing communications opportunities, describes methods and offers suggestions for both ongoing and “emergency” communications in your golf course operation. 10.2 ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS For most golf courses, ongoing communications regarding environmental issues during regular operations should be used to: 1. Inform members of environmental protection programs which are either planned or in place. For example, if you have implemented an IPM or Stewardship program, you should tell people about it. 2. Provide information to members and users on the results of environmental initiatives. For example, if you have implemented a program to reduce water consumption, you should keep members and users informed regarding your progress. 3. Provide a vehicle for members and users to make suggestions on existing programs, and to offer
  3. 3. new ideas. Options for communicating with members and users on an ongoing basis are as follows: 1. Develop an environmental policy for your course (see Section 3.0) and post it in the clubhouse where everyone can see it. 2. Include an Environmental Section in your newsletter, discussing your environmental programs and their results. 3. Have a "Suggestion Box" for environmental protection ideas. Ensure that each suggestion is reviewed and discussed with the person who made the suggestion. 4. Include information on your environmental programs on your notice board. 5. Hold information sessions on major environmental initiatives (e.g., environmental audit, IPM program, Stewardship program) for interested individuals. Unless your course has come under a great deal of public scrutiny regarding environmental issues, either through opposition during planning and construction, or as a result of problems during operation, it is not necessary to include regular communications with the press or the general public as a component of your communications program. However, if your course has been controversial, it is probably in your best interest to keep everyone informed regarding what you are doing, and how your environmental protection programs are working out. Options for doing this are as follows: 1. Hold regular Open Houses (e.g., once per year) to discuss the environmental protection programs which you have implemented. In addition to advertising these events in the community, make sure that you invite those people who have raised concerns or voiced opposition. It is important to address all of the tough questions. 2. Prepare a newsletter addressing the environmental protection programs in place on your golf course, and their results, and distribute throughout the community. Again, make sure that all individuals who have voiced concerns get a copy. 3. Schedule visits with individuals who have raised concerns. These visits can be held either on the course (to review the specific issues), or in the individuals' homes. 4. Invite a science class from a local school to your course for an afternoon to show them how you deal with environmental issues. In all communications with the public, it is essential that you are honest and straightforward. If you don't know the answer to a question, say so and offer to find out the answer. Similarly, be approachable and be yourself. Don't pretend to be the world’s leading authority on environmental issues. Use plain and simple language.
  4. 4. 10.3 COMMUNICATIONS IN CRISIS SITUATIONS A crisis has been defined as "an event that could cause permanent change for your organization" (GCSAA, 1996). Specifically, crises involve alteration or disruption to daily operations, destruction to property, endangerment to lives, damage to the position and reputation of the golf course in the community, media interest in the operation of the course and/or government investigations and potential charges under environmental legislation. Examples of crises on golf courses include: • Fires in pesticide storage areas • Releases of contaminants (e.g., pesticide releases; fuel or fertilizer spills) that result in fish and/or bird kills • Releases of contaminants which may create widespread or long-term risks to human and wildlife health (e.g., leaking UST; long-term buildup of pesticides in the sediments of a water body adjacent to your course). GCSAA has published an Emergency Communications Guidebook (GCSAA, 1996) which provides a good overview of what to do in the event of a crisis. In particular, it provides examples of documents, which can be used to help manage a crisis (e.g., Emergency Response Contact Sheets, checklists for evaluating potential crises, forms for gathering facts on the crisis, forms on which to record telephone conversations, sample media releases and sample responses to questions which often arise during crises.) Superintendents may want to review this document for further information. It is important, however, that you develop your own plan for dealing with crisis situations, as your actions will be highly influenced by local conditions. Before you use a prepared response to hypothetical questions, step back and make sure that the response is applicable to your situation. Prepared answers will generally require "tailoring" to address specific cases adequately. No matter how effective your communications program, you are still likely to face criticism from the public and the media and an investigation by regulatory enforcement personnel in the event of a crisis. Don't be surprised by this. In the long-term however, an honest, organized and consistent response to a crisis will enhance your reputation in the eyes of the public and the regulators. The most important components of an effective crisis communication plan are Honesty, Organization and Consistency. Dishonesty will eventually catch up to you in the event of a crisis, and will result in long term mistrust from the public, and potentially more severe penalties from the regulators. Therefore, tell the truth. Organization is critical in demonstrating to the public and to regulators that you are making efforts to control and mitigate the crisis. Consistency will demonstrate that you understand the situation, and that your methods in dealing with the crisis are appropriate. As noted above, you should develop a plan for dealing with a crisis, and for communicating with the media and the public should a crisis occur. Components of this plan are as follows:
  5. 5. 1. Develop a Resource File You should prepare a file of information, which is well organized and readily available to assist you in dealing with a crisis situation. This file will help you to respond more quickly should a crisis occur. The file should contain the following: • a copy of your crisis response and communications plan • Basic information on your course • Plans of your course and associated buildings • MSDS sheets for chemicals used • Map showing the location of neighbors and other significant features • Internal notification list • External notification list including police, fire department, environmental spill reporting agency, potentially affected neighbors and the media • Forms for recording telephone conversations. 2. Develop Crisis Response and Communications Plans Write down what you should do in the event of a crisis, and how you will manage communications. Steps to be taken should be written down in point form, and should be simple. The plan should address all types of potential crises. See the section 10.6 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONTINGENCY PLAN for more details. 3. Practice Implementing the Plan Other industries carry out crisis-response training that involves simulating a crisis. This procedure is beneficial because it allows you to evaluate the effectiveness of your plan, in addition to allowing you and your staff an opportunity to practice. Following the simulation, you should sit down and assess what went right, and what could be improved. 4. Designate a Spokesperson In order to provide consistent responses to inquiries from the public, the media and regulators, you should designate a spokesperson. It is important that the spokesperson be very familiar with the golf course, and fully aware of the specific crisis. All staff should be informed that inquiries should be addressed by the spokesperson. See section 10.5 HOW TO WRITE A PRESS RELEASE IN TIME OF CRISIS for guidance. 5. Assess the Situation When a problem arises, evaluate whether or not it constitutes a crisis. Use the following questions to assist you:
  6. 6. • Does the situation run the risk of escalating in intensity? • Will the situation be widely reported by the media or investigated by regulatory agencies? • Will the situation interfere with normal course operations? • Could the situation damage the course's reputation? • Could the situation damage the course's financial standing? If you answer "yes" to any of the questions, a crisis may be present. Review this with other course administration members if you have the opportunity. See the section 10.6 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONTINGENCY PLAN for more details. 6. Take Appropriate First Actions In the event of a crisis, take the following actions immediately: • Provide assistance to victims wherever required and appropriate • Take steps to minimize the impact of the situation (e.g., try to contain spills, put out fires, etc.) • Notify those who could be in danger • Notify local police and fire departments • Notify provincial Environmental Pollution Response departments • Notify course management and ownership. 7. Establish a "Command Centre" for Communications See the section 10.6 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONTINGENCY PLAN for more details. 8. Prepare an Initial Statement for Release to the Media The initial statement should identify the situation that has occurred, confirm that required agencies have been notified, and outline the actions that are being taken to mitigate the problem. See section 10.5 HOW TO WRITE A PRESS RELEASE IN TIME OF CRISIS for guidance. 9. Respond to Requests from the Media and Regulators Cooperation with the media and regulators is critical for ensuring that the correct information is released and that adversarial relations do not develop.
  7. 7. 10. Assess the Need for External or Expert Assistance In developing a response to a problem, particularly in the event of a contaminant release, it may be necessary to retain an expert to assist you with your mitigation plan. This possibility should be reviewed. 11. Be Factual in Your Disclosure Disclosures, releases and interviews should focus on the following: • What happened and where? When did it occur? • Are there any injuries or deaths as a result? • What action are you taking to control impacts? • Have hazardous substances been released into the environment? If so, what type and how much? • What types of hazards exist for neighbors? • Have emergency response agencies been notified? Which ones? • Are operations shut down? • Has the course been evacuated? 10.4 R E S P O N S E S TO COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS Commonly asked questions by your members, the public, media and environmental groups often focus on the effects and safety of pesticides. While you need to develop your own way of responding to these questions based on your understanding and assessment of the risks associated with pesticides, the following section presents some responses to typically asked questions as recommended by the Urban Pest Management Council of Canada, RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) and the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America: 1. Why do golf courses use pesticides? Pest control products (instead of “Pesticides” or herbicides, insecticides and fungicides as these tend to conjure up an image of poisonous pollution and the modern day superintendent has access to “preferred” or “natural” pest control products) help limit damage by insects, weeds and plant diseases, and are used selectively to protect the health of turf, trees and other vegetation on the golf course. Their use is one component of an Integrated Pest Management Plan (IPM) that helps ensure that we have a healthy playing surface for the game. They are not used primarily for aesthetic purposes. The key word is healthy - without healthy turfgrass and surroundings, we will not have a desirable place for the game. 2. What kind of products are used?
  8. 8. Products used are either identical or very similar to those used by homeowners in their lawns and gardens. 3. Are the products dangerous? Clearly if the products are used incorrectly they are dangerous. After all, they are used for the control of pests. However, if the products are handled and applied correctly, and in the right quantities, we feel that they do not pose a risk to human and/or wildlife health. The government regulates the introduction of pesticides into the country, as well as the storage and use of them. In particular, the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), which operates under Health Canada, issues approvals for products and their labels (which include application procedures among other things), and includes approved products on a registry. Therefore there is a lot of testing which has to be done before they can be used. 4. Are there options to using pesticides? Pesticides are only one component of an Integrated Pest Management program. Other things which we do to control pests include physical removal of weeds, optimizing of irrigation practices, clearing of underbrush around a problem area to allow for more air movement, use of natural, disease-resistant species, biological controls and other cultural practices. (Review your IPM program with the individual.) However, we have learned that the use of pesticides within our program is critical to its success. 5. Can pesticides contaminate groundwater, streams, rivers etc.? Research has shown that if you don't apply too much pesticide, and if you apply it at the right time (e.g., not on a windy day, before a major rain storm, etc.) that pesticides do not leach into the groundwater or run off into surface water. We always carry out our applications in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, and so we feel that we will not create a problem. 6. How do you know that you are handling the pesticides correctly? Our staff and contractors are all trained and have received certification from the provincial government as licensed pesticide applicators. 7. Am I at risk playing on the course after you have sprayed it? No. We feel, and the regulators support this, that as long as the products that we use are applied per their label, that neither golfers nor club members face health risks. I have spent a lot of time researching and learning about these products, and I am confident that they do not create health risks. After all, I have to work around them all the time. Some people may be allergic to specific products, just as they may be allergic to soaps and other household products. Golfers with possible allergies should talk to the superintendent about the products being used.
  9. 9. It is not recommended that you simply memorize the above answers. Instead, using the responses as a basis, develop your own opinion on the issue, and formulate your own response. Other issues to be considered in formulating your response are as follows: • It is often beneficial to tell people about the regulatory requirements associated with golf course operations. Show them some of the tables in this manual and explain to them what regulations require you to do. • In responding to questions, make sure that you first demonstrate to questioners that you understand their concerns. Restate the question, review the issues and then present your response. • Demonstrate your understanding of the question and the rationale for your response. You want to make sure that you are perceived as being honest, well-trained and rational - after all, you are! • Review the implications of not utilizing your procedures. This is often very useful in pesticide- related issues. 10.5 HOW TO WRITE A PRESS RELEASE IN TIME OF CRISIS In time of crisis it is important to understand the strategies behind turning a nightmare into an opportunity. Damage control through a carefully planned and formed press release is the most valuable tool in communicating with the press, the public and shareholders. Effective crisis management plans require pro-active movement by an organization. Act fast, get your story out, and show concern to minimize damage and avoid costly damage to your reputation. Here are guidelines to keep in mind when writing your press release. Neutralize the Negative News A damage control press release is essential to prevent negative publicity from damaging the image of the golf club, its brand identity, and public image. In the case of a lawsuit filed against your golf course, issue a press release detailing information that supports your claims, and your company’s position. In the case of a spill or other environmental emergency, issue a release both during and after the clean up effort. Connect with a Culture of Concern Demonstrate a true concern for public safety. It is not uncommon for business to experience short- term losses after a publicized emergency, causing some loss of previously loyal customers, weakened team morale, and a tarnished brand. Maintain an image of propriety, not indifference or hostility, towards the situation. The gravity of your language must reflect an appropriate level of concern for your customers. Honesty Is The Best Policy Fabricating details or denying claims that are in fact true can possibly work against you, and it is far harder to recover from the tarnished public image of a company that lies. Refrain from commenting on sensitive issues that may have legal issues, wait until the waters have calmed to point blame where it is deserved.
  10. 10. Maintain The Image Of A Good Corporate Citizen Before releasing your damage control press release, consult your lawyer. Wording is important: a misplaced or poorly thought phrase could be tacit acceptance of guilt or admittance of liability even if that was not the plan. End on a high note, emphasizing other positive aspects of your business. Companies who turn a sour situation to their benefit can win back the trust of customers affected, as well as gain new customers. 10.6 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONTINGENCY PLAN The following is a basic strategy/guide outlining how your operations should Plan for, Respond to and Recover from emergencies involving hazardous materials. The contingency plan will help you assess the risk, assign the roles and responsibilities of staff and emergency assistance, and outline steps to be followed while experiencing emergency situations.1 Be sure to review and amend according to what will flow best during emergency situations at your facility. Turf Department Management Receives Notice of an Incident 1. Information is collected by Superintendent, or in case of absent the Assistant Superintendent, using the Hazardous Material Incident Report Form in Figure 10.1. 2. Superintendent calls the appropriate emergency response agencies. 3. The Emergency Response Team (ERT) is notified by Superintendent. The ERT consists of representatives from Security Patrol, Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), General Manager, Public Affairs Officer and the Turf Department. Before any response actions are taken, the ERT will assess the information collected on the Hazardous Material Incident Report Form in Figure 10.1 and will determine the appropriate level of response. 4. The Material Safety Data Sheets for the released materials are secured by EHS. The Level of Response is Determined 5. A decision is made by the Emergency Response Team, in consultation with the Superintendent, regarding the appropriate level of response. The Plan is Activated 6. There are three levels of response depending on the magnitude of the incident and the degree of containment of the released material: • A level 1 response can be managed by the individuals responsible for the release. • A level 2 and level 3 response requires assistance from external agencies and personnel. • The plan will be activated for level 2 and 3 responses. The three levels of response: 1. There is no perceived impact on health, property, or the environment. Containment is within the capabilities of the department or individuals involved. 2. There is potential for an adverse impact on health, property, or the environment. Containment is beyond the capabilities of University employees. 3. There is a severe impact on health, property, or the environment. Several buildings/areas on campus are affected. Containment of the incident requires the assistance of multiple outside agencies duration of the event is unpredictable; long-term implications may result. 1 Simon Fraser University, Burnaby Campus – Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan, January 23rd, 2008.
  11. 11. Notifications Are Made 7. The Incident Commander (Superintendent), or designate, makes the appropriate internal notifications. EHS and the Superintendent notify the appropriate external agencies. Response 8. Superintendent coordinates the evacuation of the affected area / building. 9. The Incident Command Post is established within a safe distance from the incident. 10. The Emergency Response Team conducts a risk assessment to identify the hazards and risks involved in responding to the emergency situation. 11. First aid and assembly areas are established. 12. The Fire Department Chief assumes command once he/she arrives at the scene. 13. Necessary information is relayed to the Fire Department by the Superintendent, such as information about the nature of the released hazardous material(s) and the number of injured persons. 14. The ERT provides assistance to the Fire Department in developing measures for assuring personnel safety while responding to the incident. 16. After assessing the level of risk and determining that it is safe, the Fire Department will enter the affected area to remove individuals requiring rescue and will provide first aid as required. 17. The release is contained by the Fire Department. Clean-up & Recovery 18. Clean-up will proceed in consultation with the appropriate parties. 19. Incident/accident report is completed and persons involved in the response attend a debriefing.
  12. 12. Figure 10.1 Hazardous Material Incident Response Form 2 2 Simon Fraser University, Burnaby Campus – Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan, January 23rd, 2008.
  13. 13. 10.7 COLLEAGUE EXAMPLE – Saskatoon Golf and Country Club Emergency Response Contingency Plan 1.) Reportable Quantities If a spill occurs and the amounts stated below are exceeded, then it is mandatory to contact the Spill Report Center at 1-800-667-7525 a) Fuel/ Oil 200L b) Pesticides Concentrate 5KG or 5 Litres Mix 70 Litres or more Note: Judgment must be exercised when reporting spills lower than the stated amounts. (ie. Spills on or near drinking water sources or other sensitive areas should be reported regardless of the amount) 2.) Scope: The general purpose of this plan is to provide employees with information of what to do should an accidental spill or emergency occur at the Saskatoon Golf & Country Club which is a 36 hole golf facility located just north of Cartwright St. W. and west of Lorne Avenue. The legal description of the property is S/W & S/E1/4 SEC 17-36-5-3 within the Municipality of Corman Park, City of Saskatoon. Nest Page shows aerial photo of maintenance area as well as a map of the course location.
  14. 14. 3) Notification Procedures Immediately contact the Spill Report Center at 1-800-667-7525 Contact if Applicable Saskatoon City Police_________________ 975-8300 Corman Park Police__________________ 242-8808 Saskatoon Fire Department____________ 911 if emergency ____________975-2520 Administration Ambulance__________________________ 911 PoisonControlCenter__________________665-1010 RUH Emergency Dept. Canutec (Canadian Transport Emergency Center) 613-996-6666 Saskatoon Golf & Country Club Representatives Executive Director : Kelly Boes W931-0022 H343-1501 Golf Course Supt. Terry McNeilly W242-4368 H931-3759 4.) Person in Charge Golf Course Superintendent Terry McNeilly 5.) Containment and Clean-Up Procedures The Saskatoon Golf & Country Club stores a limited amount of pesticides on the property, they are stored in the north bay of the three door shed on the west side of the maintenance yard. The list of current pesticides stored on the property is listed below, this would be an average amount stored at any one time:
  15. 15. Pesticide Inventory November 8, 2005 Trade Name Active Ingredient PCPA Reg # Qty: Aliette Fosetyl AL 24458 2kg Ambush Tree & Garden Insect Killer Permethrin 23069 1L Ant & Grub Killer Chlorpyrifos 18801 500g Bug-B-Gon Diazinon 23931 800ml Critter Ridder Oil of Black Pepper, Piperine, Capsaicin 25829 500ml Daconil Chlorothalonil 15724 10 L Deep Woods Off Deet 24723 1610g Diazinon 500 E Diazinon 11889 1L Diazinon 50 EC Diazinon 16518 3L Diazinon Diazinon 10914 1L Dursban Turf Chlorpyrifos 20575 1L Gopher Ground Squirrel Bait Strychrine alkaloid 25472 4.6 kg Heritage Azoxystrobin 26155 1 kg Killex 2,4-D, Mecoprop, Dicamba 20981 8L Killex 500 2,4-D, Mecoprop, Dicamba 16971 20 L Nature Aide Liquid Cutrine Plus Copper 13249 10 gal Primo Maxx Trinexapec-ethyl 26989 7.8 L Ratak + Brodifacoum 16064 400g Round Up Glyphosate 25344 5L Skoot Thiram 13258 10 L Subdue Maxx Metalaxyl-M & S-isomer 27055 600ml Equipment Readily Available for Clean-up and Containment Respirators, Spray suits, Absorbent material, plastic bins/lids for storage of contaminated absorbent material. Unlined gloves and boots, neutralizing material (bleach, lime, washing soda), long handled broom, shovel. All above are located closely to the pesticide storage area.
  16. 16. Pesticide Cleanup Procedures When a spill occurs, regardless of the size of the spill or the amount of pesticide that has leaked, it should be CLEANED UP as quickly and safely as possible. The affected area then must be DECONTAMINATED immediately. Depending on the circumstances surrounding the spill, the priorities may vary. The following guidelines are to be used to supplement label information and information from key government agencies. They are: - Remove all persons and animals from the spill area. Extreme caution should be exercised in entering a contaminated area and adequate personal protective equipment should be worn. - Apply the general principals of first aid, such as basic life support procedures. Remove contaminated clothing and thoroughly wash affected skin areas with soap and water. - Isolate the spill area so that no unauthorized person, animal or vehicle is exposed or contaminated by accidentally moving into the spill. Establish a decontamination line around the perimeter. Anyone entering the area must be wearing adequate protective equipment. Persons and/or vehicles leaving the spill area should be decontaminated. - Contain the spread of the pesticide to prevent further contamination of the environment, particularly water bodies. Stop the continued leaking of a container. Use any substance that will soak up the pesticide to create a barrier: soil, sawdust, newspaper, vermiculite, kitty litter. - Contact the pesticide manufacturer or distributor to obtain appropriate information on the cleanup and decontamination of the spill area. Technical information can also be obtained from CANUTEC, the emergency response system for dangerous goods in Ottawa 613-999-6666. - Call local police, fire department or ambulance if required. - Report the spill to the Spill Report Center 1-800-667-7525 - The Spill Report Center will require the following information: -The location (address or highway number) and time of the spill. -The type (product name) and quantity of pesticide spilled. -The cause and potential effects of the spill. -A description of the spill site and the surrounding area (soil type, surface water drainage characteristics, water table depth, proximity to dwellings, location of underground service lines). -Details of action taken and proposed action. This will include containment work, details of cleanup and restoration procedures, and details of disposal including the location and procedures. What you can expect of the Spill Report Centre: -Spill cleanup advice. -A spill response team, available around the clock, will confirm the adequacy of measures taken to
  17. 17. clean up the spill and/or give instructions on measures to be taken. - The spill response team may make an on-site inspection to determine if appropriate measures are being taken during the cleanup operation, and to ensure that spilled materials are properly cleaned up and disposed of. - The centre will act as a liaison with other agencies that might be affected (community officials, the provincial Emergency Measures Organization, the Department of Labor and the federal government). - The centre can advise of further reporting and procedures that may be required. Cleanup of the spill area Pump surplus liquid pesticide into drums. Small amounts of liquids should be soaked up in sawdust, soil or other absorbent material. Dry powder or granular pesticides should be lightly wetted or sprinkled with damp soil or sawdust. Then shovel this material into a drum. If the spill occurred on the ground, it may be necessary to dig up the contaminated area and place the soil in drums. Place leaky or damaged containers in drums or heavy plastic bags. Inside a building, ventilate the area to prevent the buildup of toxic fumes. Decontamination of the spill area After removing the spilled pesticide, soak the contaminated area with a mixture of equal parts bleach and water. A dike placed around the spill area will prevent the spread of the decontamination solution. Caustic soda (lye) in water may be used instead of bleach. Then without removing the chemicals, spread hydrated lime over the entire and leave for 1-2 hours. After this period, shovel the material into drums. Repeat the application of bleach in water (1:1 ratio) over the entire area and allow it to stand for a further 30 minutes. Then hose down the entire area with water and a strong detergent as a final cleanup. CONSULT THE LABEL OR MANUFACTURER FOR SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS ON DECONTAMINATION SINCE NOT ALL PESTICIDES ARE DETOXIFIED BY THE ABOVE PROCEDURE. All equipment used in the cleanup, as well as vehicles contaminated by the spill, should be decontaminated using the same procedures. Wash all protective clothing and equipment before reuse. All workers must shower and change to clean clothing. Drums containing the cleanup material should be covered and labeled “SPILLED PESTICIDE – POISON’, with the trade name or common name included. Drums should be transported to the disposal site designated by the local office of the Ministry of the Environment. PESTICIDE FIRES AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS Check the label for warning symbols and precautions or directions regarding temperature and proximity to open flames and heat. Pesticides which contain oils will burn readily or the containers will explode when over-heated. Some solvents which are used as carriers are highly flammable and explosive. Certain dry formulations also have the potential to ignite. Sodium chlorate is well known for its flammability when it is in contact with various substances. If it spills on clothing and dries, it is a serious hazard
  18. 18. to the wearer. Some dusts or powders, particularly those that are very fine (e.g. Sulfur) may ignite as easily as gases or vapours. The major hazard with fires and explosions is the release of the toxic fumes and smoke. These are often more dangerous than the pesticide itself. Another hazard is the contamination of water used to control the blaze. The contaminated water is potentially harmful to the fire fighting personnel and the environment. Workers and fire fighters must be aware of the potential poisoning hazard of pesticide fires so they can protect themselves. The Storage Area Keep the storage locked at all times when not in use to prevent fires from being deliberately set. Store combustible materials away from heating devices. Do not store glass containers in the sunlight where the containers could concentrate heat rays and start fires. Fireproof materials should be used to line the storage area. Workers should be familiar with fire extinguisher locations. Storage areas should be located as far as possible away from other buildings and populated areas. Local firemen should be notified of the contents of a storage facility of any size. If a fire or explosion occurs, the following guidelines should be followed: • Someone familiar with the pesticide toxicity and hazards of the resulting smoke, fumes, splashes or other contamination should be on hand to warn firemen or anyone in the vicinity. • Evacuate residents downwind of the fire and do not enter the downwind area. Personnel should remain upwind of the fire while fighting it. Prevent anyone from entering the burned out area until the cleanup is complete. Check the downwind area for pesticide contamination before allowing evacuated residents to return. • Personnel assisting the firemen should wear full protective gear. When working in or near the smoke and fumes a facemask and self-contained air supply may be necessary. • Avoid dragging hoses and equipment through pesticide-contaminated water. Assume that all equipment used to fight a fire is contaminated and hazardous until decontaminated. • The runoff water should be diked to prevent it from entering sewers or water supplies. Clean up the contaminated water and decontaminate buildings and equipment, using the procedures for a spill. • Avoid solid streams of water if possible as the force tends to spread contaminated material and cause dusts to become airborne. This would be a possible explosion hazard or respiratory hazard. • Overheated containers may erupt at any time. Try to keep a safe distance from the fire. • DO NOT SMOKE, DRINK OR EAT in the vicinity of pesticide smoke or fumes. • After the fire is controlled, immediately change clothing and wash. All clothing and other safety equipment should be thoroughly washed. • Check for leaking or otherwise damaged containers. These may cause further contamination at a later date.
  19. 19. The preceding information was taken from the Saskatchewan Pesticide Applicator Handbook Agriculture Division Fuel Spill Cleanup Land Spill: Eliminate any source of ignition. Keep public away. Prevent additional discharge of material, if possible to do so without hazard. Prevent spills from entering sewers, watercourses or low areas. Contain spilled liquid with sand or earth. Do not use combustible materials such as sawdust. Recover by pumping (use an explosion proof motor or hand pump), or by using a suitable absorbent. Consult an expert on disposal of recovered material. Ensure disposal is in compliance with government requirements and ensure conformity to local disposal regulations. Notify the appropriate authorities immediately. Take all additional action necessary to prevent and remedy the adverse effects of the spill. Reportable amounts; Any spill over 200L must be reported to the Spill Report Center at 1-800-667-7525 Should an explosion or fire occur the fire department, police or ambulance should be called immediately. Major Response Steps Typical response steps in the event of a spill of hazardous materials 1. Assess the situation, identify the products involved carefully locate, the source of the leak and define a safety perimeter • Depending on the scope of the spill, it may be useful at this stage to launch a preliminary internal notification procedure if you have enough information. • It may also be useful at this stage to immediately inform CANUTEC and you Regional Environment Canada Emergencies Division to obtain technical support on line. 2. Carefully Stop or Control The Leak • Only if the site is deemed safe enough (e.g. valves or taps are turned off). • Approach the site with the wind at your back. 3. Confine The Spill or Contain The Product • Insofar as the situation permits, an attempt must be made to contain the spilled product in the smallest possible space close to the source. • Avoid directing the product toward the sewer system or water. 4. Notify Authorities • Spill Report Center at 1-800-667-7525 • Local specialized clean up firms if necessary • Fire Department if needed • Police Department if needed 5. Recover Spilled Materials • The product must be recovered quickly to limit its migration or spread, taking into consideration the properties of the product and weather conditions. 6. Safely Dispose of Contaminated Materials and Waste
  20. 20. • Use an accredited firm. Obtain a correctly completed waybill (i.e. a hazardous waste transportation manifest). 7. Prepare an Accident Report • Fill out a Written Spill Report Form for the Saskatchewan Environment. Forward the report to the proper department.

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