Performance management and employee development

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Performance management and employee development: overview

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Performance management and employee development

  1. 1. Personal Developmental Plans Direct Supervisor’s Role 360-degree Feedback Systems Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  2. 2. Employees  Help plan their own development  Improve their own performance Managers  Help guide the process of development  Support success of process Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  3. 3. Specify actions necessary to improve performance Highlight employee’s  Strengths  Areas in need of development Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  4. 4. How can I continuously learn and grow in the next year? How can I do better in the future? How can I avoid performance problems of the past? Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  5. 5. Developmental Plan Objectives Content of Developmental Plan Developmental Activities Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  6. 6. Encourage:  Continuous learning  Performance improvement  Personal growth Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  7. 7. Improve performance in current job Sustain performance in current job Prepare employee for advancement Enrich employee’s work experience Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  8. 8.  Developmental objectives  New skills or knowledge  Timeline  How the new skills or knowledge will be acquired  Resources  Strategies  Standards and measures used to assess achievement of objectives Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  9. 9.  Based on needs of organization and employee  Chosen by employee and direct supervisor  Taking into account  Employee’s learning preferences  Developmental objective in question  Organization’s available resources Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  10. 10.  On-the-job-training  Mentoring  Job rotation  Temporary assignments Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  11. 11.  Courses  Self-guided reading  Getting a degree  Attending a conference  Membership or leadership role  in professional or trade organization Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  12. 12. Explain what is necessary Refer employee to appropriate developmental activities Review & make suggestions regarding developmental objectives Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  13. 13. Check on employee’s progress Provide motivational reinforcement Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  14. 14. Tools to help employees  Improve performance by using Performance information Gathered from many sources  Superiors  Peers  Customers  Subordinates  The employee Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  15. 15.  Anonymous feedback  Most useful when used  For DEVELOPMENT  NOT for administrative purposes  Internet used for collecting data Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  16. 16. Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  17. 17. Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  18. 18. Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  19. 19. Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  20. 20.  Cooperation  Openness and trust  Input and participation valued  Fairness Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  21. 21.  Advantages of 360-degree Feedback Systems  Risks of 360-degree Feedback Systems  Characteristics of a Good 360-degree Feedback System Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  22. 22.  Decreased possibility of biases  Increased awareness of expectations  Increased commitment to improve  Improved self-perception of performance  Improved performance  Reduction of ‘undiscussables’  Increased employee control of their own careers Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  23. 23.  Unconstructive negative feedback hurts.  Are individuals comfortable with the system? User acceptance is crucial.  If few raters, anonymity is compromised.  Raters may become overloaded. Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  24. 24.  Anonymity  Observation of employee performance  Avoidance of survey fatigue  Raters are trained  Used for developmental purposes only  Emphasis on behaviors  Raters go beyond ratings  Feedback interpretation  Follow-up Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006

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