Starting Small, Growing Large

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Iterative Growth in SharePoint Environments.

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Starting Small, Growing Large

  1. 1. Starting Small, Growing Large<br />Iterative Growth in SharePoint Environments<br />
  2. 2. A Little Background<br />Troy Lanphier<br />Background in Server and Storage Infrastructure<br />SharePoint Technical Focus since 2003<br />Microsoft Certified Trainer<br />Over 15 years of consulting experience<br />Technical Editor – O’Reilly/MS Press<br />
  3. 3. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 1: Don’t Default!<br />
  4. 4. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 1: Don’t Default! Part One<br /> – Use Named Instances<br />
  5. 5. Tip 1 – Use SQL Instances<br />A Named Instance is simply a way to partition one set of SQL databases from another on the same server, allowing them to function independently of one another.<br />Should all databases live in the same instance?<br />How is maintenance handled?<br />What about security and service accounts?<br />SQL Collation for SharePoint Databases<br />- Latin1_General_CI_AS_KS_WS<br />The Problem<br />Shared SQL Server Instance<br />
  6. 6. Tip 1 – Use SQL Instances<br />Should all databases live in the same instance?<br />How is maintenance handled?<br />What about security and service accounts?<br />Instance is referred to by “servername/instance”<br />Each Named Instance is segregated – more secure<br />Maintenance is performed on each Instance<br />Licensing costs are reduced<br />Consolidations have less effect on SP Operations<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />Shared SQL Server Instance<br />Create a Named Instance<br />
  7. 7. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 2: Don’t Default!<br />
  8. 8. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 2: Don’t Default! Part Two<br /> – Content and SA DBs<br />
  9. 9. Tip 2 – Watch out for the Wizard<br />If you run the Wizard to build your service applications in SP2010, you get an appended GUID.<br />If you build Content Databases, name them appropriately to avoid a GUID<br />GUIDs make it difficult to administer DBs<br />Scripts, in particular do not like the “-”<br />Some Third Party tools will not work with databases that contain GUIDs in the name<br />The Problem<br />GUIDs<br />
  10. 10. Tip 2 – Watch out for the Wizard<br />GUIDs make it difficult to administer DBs<br />Scripts, in particular do not like the “-”<br />Some Third Party tools will not work with databases that contain GUIDs in the name<br />GUID – Globally Unique IDentifier<br />When building Content Databases, never use the “WSS_Content” default<br />The next “automatic” name will have a GUID<br />Build Service Applications Manually or via Script<br />Specify the Database names<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />GUIDs<br />No GUIDs<br />
  11. 11. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 3: Use an Alias<br />
  12. 12. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 3: Use an Alias,<br /> Become more flexible<br />
  13. 13. Tip 3 – Alias your SQL Instance<br />A SQL Alias is used to create a “database server name” that actually refers to your SQL Named Instance, e.g. “SPSQL” instead of “servernameinstance”.<br />What happens when the database server is decommissioned?<br />Changing SQL Database servers is possible for a SharePoint farm, but there are better ways to spend your weekend <br />The Problem<br />Using just the Instance Name<br />
  14. 14. Tip 3 – Alias your SQL Instance<br />What happens when the database server is decommissioned?<br />Changing SQL Database servers is possible for a SharePoint farm, but there are better ways to spend your weekend <br />Build an Alias on each farm server using cliconfg<br />The Alias is used in setup instead of directly referring to the instance name<br />Gives you an easy way to back out of a failed database server move<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />Using just the Instance Name<br />Create a SQL Alias on the Farm Servers<br />
  15. 15. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 4: Service Level Agreements<br />
  16. 16. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 4: Service Level Agreements<br /> - Not as bad as you think<br />
  17. 17. Tip 4 – Service Level Agreements<br />A Service Level Agreement defines the levels and requirements for expected (and sometimes unexpected) farm outages<br />Some portions of the business may see SharePoint as a critical service<br />Any outage may be perceived as an unexpected outage<br />All events are created equal<br />The Problem<br />No Service Level Agreements<br />
  18. 18. Tip 4 – Service Level Agreements<br />Some portions of the business may see SharePoint as a critical service<br />Any outage may be perceived as an unexpected outage<br />All events are created equal<br />Create an understanding between the Business and IT about what constitutes services availability.<br />Define different processes for Outages, Business Continuity, and Flat-Earth (DR) Events<br />One size may not fit all<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />No Service Level Agreements<br />Create a Resilient SLA<br />
  19. 19. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 5: Sites vs. Site Collections<br />
  20. 20. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 5: Sites vs. Site Collections<br /> - Segmenting the Data<br />
  21. 21. Tip 5 – Sites vs. Site Collections<br />In most out of the box installations, only a handful of Site Collections are utilized; each contains a series of Sites.<br />Collaborative and Publishing sites are intermingled<br />As the site grows and subsites are added, navigation becomes an issue<br />No logical way to separate data<br />The Problem<br />Using Few Site Collections<br />
  22. 22. Tip 5 – Sites vs. Site Collections<br />Collaborative and Publishing sites are intermingled<br />As the site grows and subsites are added, navigation becomes an issue<br />No logical way to separate data<br />Allows data to be segmented, fostering scalability<br />Gives business the ability to self-manage collaborative sites<br />Partitions collaborative and publishing sites<br />Managed Paths allow SCs to be nested<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />Using Few Site Collections<br />Use Multiple Site Collections<br />
  23. 23. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 6: Define Managed Paths<br />
  24. 24. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 6: Define Managed Paths<br /> - Smooth Navigation<br />
  25. 25. Tip 6 – Define Managed Paths<br />Multiple Site Collections can be placed in the same Navigational Hierarchy.<br />Without Managed Paths, each Site Collection requires a distinct URL<br />Users navigating the site can become confused by an ever-changing URL structure<br />The Problem<br />No Managed Paths<br />
  26. 26. Tip 6 – Define Managed Paths<br />Without Managed Paths, each Site Collection requires a distinct URL<br />Users navigating the site can become confused by an ever-changing URL structure<br />Allows for Site Collections to be nested<br />Example – http://portal /sitecollection<br />Wildcard Managed Paths also exist<br />Example – http://portal/EMP/sitecollection<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />No Managed Paths<br />Use Explicit Managed Paths<br />
  27. 27. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 7: Use Quotas Effectively<br />
  28. 28. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 7: Use Quotas Effectively<br /> - It’s easier to give than take<br />
  29. 29. Tip 7 – Use Quotas Effectively<br />Quotas are assigned at a Site Collection Level; when a site nears its maximum capacity, the Primary and Secondary Site Collection Owners are notified.<br />No maximum storage = unbridled growth<br />If a Site Collection requires more space, then a different quota can be applied<br />When the Site Collection is big enough, it can be moved into its own Content DB<br />The Problem<br />No Quotas or Quota Templates<br />
  30. 30. Tip 7 – Use Quotas Effectively<br />No maximum storage = unbridled growth<br />If a Site Collection requires more space, then a different quota can be applied<br />When the Site Collection is big enough, it can be moved into its own Content DB<br />Initially define a core set of quotas<br />Decide early on what the process is for sites nearing their max size<br />Determine if the different quotas rate different treatment in the Service Level Agreement<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />No Quotas or Quota Templates<br />Build and Apply Quota Templates<br />
  31. 31. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 8: Spread the Wealth<br />
  32. 32. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 8: Spread the Wealth<br /> - Don’t Skimp on the DBs<br />
  33. 33. Tip 8 – Use More Than One DB<br />Content DBs can host thousands of Site Collections. If multiple Content Databases are assigned to a Web Application, SharePoint will build SCs in “Round Robin” fashion, filling the DBs fairly evenly.<br />An “Out-Of-The-Box” experience will build one Content DB per Web App. <br />Storage Capacity becomes an issue<br />Data Recovery becomes an issue<br />The Problem<br />Using One Content DB<br />
  34. 34. Tip 8 – Use More Than One DB<br />An “Out-Of-The-Box” experience will build one Content DB per Web App. <br />Storage Capacity becomes an issue<br />Data Recovery becomes an issue<br />A single Web Application can have multiple Content Databases<br />Build and Lock your Publishing Site Content DBs<br />Build Multiple Content DBs for Collaboration <br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />Using One Content DB<br />Create Multiple Content DBs<br />
  35. 35. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 9: Cooking in the Kitchen<br />
  36. 36. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 9: Cooking in the Kitchen<br /> - Eating in the Dining Room<br />
  37. 37. Tip 9 – Cooking in the Kitchen<br />Using Site Collections, Quotas and Managed Paths, you can begin to think about segmenting Collaborative and Publishing site functionality.<br />Not all info should be shown to everyone<br />Permissions can become problematic<br />Discarded Sites are not apparent<br />No automated monitoring of site use<br />The Problem<br />Generating and Consuming Data in One SharePoint Site<br />
  38. 38. Tip 9 – Cooking in the Kitchen<br />Not all info should be shown to everyone<br />Permissions can become problematic<br />Discarded Sites are not apparent<br />No automated monitoring of site use<br />Collaborative sites may not require stringent controls<br />Sites can be built that cross business divisions<br />Discarded sites are monitored automatically<br />A process to retire unused SCs must be in place<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />Generating and Consuming Data in One SharePoint Site<br />Create Non-Publishing Sites as Separate Site Collections<br />
  39. 39. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 10: One to One Collaboration<br />
  40. 40. 10 Tips for Creating a Flexible SharePoint Implementation<br />Tip 10: One to One Collaboration<br /> - Enabling Personal Sites<br />
  41. 41. Tip 10 – Using Personal Sites<br />Controversial Statement of the Day – <br /><ul><li>Personal Sites, AKA “My Sites” can be planned and implemented in a controlled fashion</li></ul>My Sites are often not used<br />Perceived lack of governance<br />My Sites are often not planned<br />A lack of databases equates to large DB(s)<br />The Problem<br />My Sites:<br /> Not used or not planned<br />
  42. 42. Tip 10 – Use More Than One DB<br />My Sites are often not used<br />Perceived lack of governance<br />My Sites are often not planned<br />A lack of databases equates to large DB(s)<br />Populate the “Manager” field<br />Decide how sites should be “retired”<br />Site Quotas should be applied for the “My Sites” Web Application<br />The Problem<br />The Solution<br />My Sites:<br />Not used or not planned<br />Create Multiple Content DBs<br />
  43. 43. Contact Information<br />Twitter@TroyLanphier<br />E-mailt.lanphier@guio.com <br />Blogblog.sharepointcookbook.com<br />

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