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6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 1 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 2 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 3 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 4 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 5 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 6 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 7 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 8 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 9 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 10 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 11 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 12 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 13 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 14 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 15 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 16 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 17 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 18 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 19 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 20 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 21 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 22 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 23 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 24 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 25 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 26 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 27 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 28 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 29 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 30 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 31 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 32 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 33 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 34 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 35 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 36 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 37 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 38 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 39 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 40 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 41 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 42 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 43 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 44 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 45 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 46 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 47 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 48 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 49 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 50 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 51 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 52 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 53 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 54 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 55 6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect Slide 56
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6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect

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This presentation dives into six of the core OSHA regulations that must exist in written form. These programs include: Bloodborne Pathogens, Emergency Action, Fire Prevention, Hazard Communication, Respiratory Protection, Lockout/Tagout. Find out what needs to be included in these written programs to stay compliant.

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6 OSHA Programs You Can't Afford to Neglect

  1. 1. 6 OSHA Programs You Can’t Afford to Neglect From HazCom to Fire Prevention, make sure these plans are up-to-date.
  2. 2. Meet Your Moderator: James Ciccone
  3. 3.  All lines will be muted – please communicate via the questions tab in your webinar panel.  There will be live, interactive polling.  There will be a Q&A session at the end of the presentation – submit your question(s) anytime throughout the webinar.  Stick around for an exclusive offer at the end of the webinar. Webinar Overview
  4. 4. Meet Your Presenter Rick Foote EHS Consulting Manager rfoote@triumvirate.com 617-686-6184 25 plus years experience in EHS management
  5. 5. Our Key Message Focus on Six Core OSHA Required Written Programs
  6. 6. What Will You Learn? What written programs are required? What is required in each program? When do you need to update each program?
  7. 7. “Do I need to have a written program for all of the OSHA regulations?”
  8. 8. “Am I ready for OSHA to visit and inspect my programs?”
  9. 9. Poll Question How prepared are you for your next OSHA inspection?
  10. 10. Agenda Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A
  11. 11. OSHA Has Been Busy • OSHA Conducted 92,000 inspections • There were over 188,000 violations cited • There was approximately $240 million in penalties
  12. 12. Written Programs • Bloodborne Pathogens Safety Program 1910.1030 • Confined Space Entry (Permit-Required) 1910.146 • Electrical Safety Plan 1910.331-335 • Emergency Action Plan 1910.38 • Fire Extinguisher Program 1910.157
  13. 13. Written Programs • Fire Prevention Plan 1910.39 • Fire Protection Equipment Maintenance Plan Subpart L • Hazard Communication Program 1910.1200 • Hearing Conservation Program 1910.95 • Hot Work (Cutting/Welding) Program 1910.252-255
  14. 14. Written Programs • Laboratory Safety Program 1910.1450 • Lockout/Tagout 1910.147 • Machine Safeguarding Program 1910.212 • Material Handling & Crane Safety 1910.179/184 • Medical Record Access 1910.1020
  15. 15. Written Programs • Mechanical Power Presses 1910.217 • Personal Protective Equipment Program 1910.132 • Powered Industrial Truck Program 1910.178 • Process Safety Management 1910.119 • Respiratory Protection Program 1910.134
  16. 16. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  17. 17. Scope and Application • This rule applies to all occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. Definitions: • Occupational Exposure means reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee's duties. Bloodborne Pathogens Plan
  18. 18. Each employer having an employee(s) with occupational exposure shall establish a written Exposure Control Plan designed to eliminate or minimize employee exposure. Bloodborne Pathogens Content
  19. 19. Bloodborne Pathogens Content The plan must include the following items: • The exposure determination • The schedule and method of implementation for:  Methods of Compliance  HIV and HBV Research Laboratories and Production Facilities  Hepatitis B Vaccination and Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follow-up  Communication of Hazards to Employees  Recordkeeping
  20. 20. Bloodborne Pathogens Content • The procedure for the evaluation of circumstances surrounding exposure incidents. • Each employer shall ensure that a copy of the Exposure Control Plan is accessible to employees.
  21. 21. Bloodborne Pathogens Content The Exposure Control Plan shall be reviewed and updated at least annually and whenever necessary to reflect new or modified tasks and procedures which affect occupational exposure and to reflect new or revised employee positions with occupational exposure.
  22. 22. Bloodborne Pathogens Content The review and update of such plans shall also: • Reflect changes in technology that eliminate or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens; and • Document annually consideration and implementation of appropriate commercially available and effective safer medical devices designed to eliminate or minimize occupational exposure.
  23. 23. Bloodborne Pathogens Content • An employer shall solicit input from non-managerial employees responsible for direct patient care who are potentially exposed to injuries from contaminated sharps in the identification, evaluation, and selection of effective engineering and work practice controls and shall document the solicitation in the Exposure Control Plan. • The Exposure Control Plan shall be made available to the Assistant Secretary and the Director upon request for examination and copying.
  24. 24. Exposure Determination • A list of all job classifications in which all employees in those job classifications have occupational exposure; • A list of job classifications in which some employees have occupational exposure, and • A list of all tasks and procedures or groups of closely related task and procedures in which occupational exposure occurs and that are performed by employees in job classifications listed. • This exposure determination shall be made without regard to the use of personal protective equipment.
  25. 25. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  26. 26. Emergency Action Plans Written and oral emergency action plans: • An emergency action plan must be in writing, kept in the workplace, and available to employees for review. • However, an employer with 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to employees.
  27. 27. Emergency Action Plans Content • Procedures for reporting a fire or other emergency; • Procedures for emergency evacuation, including type of evacuation and exit route assignments; • Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate; • Procedures to account for all employees after evacuation;
  28. 28. Emergency Action Plans Content • Procedures to be followed by employees performing rescue or medical duties; and • The name or job title of every employee who may be contacted by employees who need more information about the plan or an explanation of their duties under the plan.
  29. 29. Training & Review Training • An employer must designate and train employees to assist in a safe and orderly evacuation of other employees. Review of emergency action plan • An employer must review the emergency action plan with each employee covered by the plan: • When the plan is developed or the employee is assigned initially to a job; • When the employee's responsibilities under the plan change; and • When the plan is changed.
  30. 30. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  31. 31. Fire Prevention Plan Application • An employer must have a fire prevention plan when an OSHA standard in this part requires one. Written and oral fire prevention plans • A fire prevention plan must be in writing, be kept in the workplace, and be made available to employees for review. • However, an employer with 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to employees.
  32. 32. Fire Prevention Plan Content • A list of all major fire hazards, proper handling and storage procedures for hazardous materials, potential ignition sources and their control, and the type of fire protection equipment necessary to control each major hazard; • Procedures to control accumulations of flammable and combustible waste materials • Procedures for regular maintenance of safeguards installed on heat-producing equipment to prevent the accidental ignition of combustible materials;
  33. 33. Fire Prevention Plan Content • The name or job title of employees responsible for maintaining equipment to prevent or control sources of ignition or fires; and • The name or job title of employees responsible for the control of fuel source hazards.
  34. 34. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  35. 35. Hazard Communication Requires chemical manufacturers or importers to classify the hazards of chemicals which they produce or import, and all employers to provide information to their employees about the hazardous chemicals to which they are exposed, by means of a hazard communication program, labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and information and training.
  36. 36. Hazard Communication Plan Content Employers shall develop, implement, and maintain at each workplace, a written hazard communication program which at least describes how the criteria of this section for labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and employee information and training will be met.
  37. 37. Hazard Communication Plan Content • A list of the hazardous chemicals known to be present using a product identifier that is referenced on the appropriate safety data sheet (the list may be compiled for the workplace as a whole or for individual work areas); and, • The methods the employer will use to inform employees of the hazards of non-routine tasks (for example, the cleaning of reactor vessels), and the hazards associated with chemicals contained in unlabeled pipes in their work areas.
  38. 38. Hazard Communication Plan Content Multi-employer workplaces • Employers who produce, use, or store hazardous chemicals at a workplace in such a way that the employees of other employer(s) may be exposed (for example, employees of a construction contractor working on-site) shall additionally ensure that the hazard communication programs include the following:
  39. 39. Hazard Communication Plan Content Multi-employer workplaces (continued) • The methods used to provide the other employer(s) on-site access to safety data sheets for each hazardous chemical the other employer(s)' employees may be exposed to while working; • The methods used to inform the other employer(s) of any precautionary measures that need to be taken to protect employees during the workplace's normal operating conditions and in foreseeable emergencies; and,
  40. 40. Hazard Communication Plan Content Multi-employer workplaces (continued) • The methods used to inform the other employer(s) of the labeling system used in the workplace. • The employer may rely on an existing hazard communication program to comply with these requirements, provided that it meets the criteria established by this regulation.
  41. 41. Hazard Communication Plan Content • The employer shall make the written hazard communication program available, upon request, to employees, their designated representatives, the Assistant Secretary and the Director. • Where employees must travel between workplaces during a work shift, i.e. their work is carried out at more than one geographical location, the written hazard communication program may be kept at the primary workplace facility.
  42. 42. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  43. 43. Respiratory Protection Plan • A respirator shall be provided to each employee when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of such employee. • The employer shall provide the respirators which are applicable and suitable for the purpose intended. The employer shall be responsible for the establishment and maintenance of a respiratory protection program. • The program shall cover each employee required by this section to use a respirator.
  44. 44. Respiratory Protection Plan Content • In any workplace where respirators are necessary to protect the health of the employee or whenever respirators are required by the employer, the employer shall establish and implement a written respiratory protection program with worksite-specific procedures. • The program shall be updated as necessary to reflect those changes in workplace conditions that affect respirator use. The employer shall include in the program the following:
  45. 45. Respiratory Protection Plan Content • Procedures for selecting respirators for use in the workplace; • Medical evaluations of employees required to use respirators; • Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators; • Procedures for proper use of respirators in routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations; • Procedures and schedules for cleaning, disinfecting, storing, inspecting, repairing, discarding, and otherwise maintaining respirators;
  46. 46. Respiratory Protection Plan Content• Procedures to ensure adequate air quality, quantity, and flow of breathing air for atmosphere-supplying respirators; • Training of employees in the respiratory hazards to which they are potentially exposed during routine and emergency situations; • Training of employees in the proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any limitations on their use, and their maintenance; and • Procedures for regularly evaluating the effectiveness of the program.
  47. 47. Respiratory Protection Plan Content Where respirator use is not required: • An employer may provide respirators at the request of employees or permit employees to use their own respirators, if the employer determines that such respirator use will not in itself create a hazard. If the employer determines that any voluntary respirator use is permissible, the employer shall provide the respirator users with the information contained in Appendix D to this section ("Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard"); and
  48. 48. Respiratory Protection Plan Content • In addition, the employer must establish and implement those elements of a written respiratory protection program necessary to ensure that any employee using a respirator voluntarily is medically able to use that respirator, and that the respirator is cleaned, stored, and maintained so that its use does not present a health hazard to the user. • Exception: Employers are not required to include in a written respiratory protection program those employees whose only use of respirators involves the voluntary use of filtering facepieces (dust masks).
  49. 49. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  50. 50. Lockout/Tagout Plan • This standard covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy, could harm employees. • This standard establishes minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy.
  51. 51. Lockout/Tagout Plan Contents • Procedures shall be developed, documented and utilized for the control of potentially hazardous energy when employees are engaged in the activities covered by this section. • The procedures shall clearly and specifically outline the scope, purpose, authorization, rules, and techniques to be utilized for the control of hazardous energy, and the means to enforce compliance including, but not limited to, the following:
  52. 52. Lockout/Tagout Plan Contents • A specific statement of the intended use of the procedure; • Specific procedural steps for shutting down, isolating, blocking and securing machines or equipment to control hazardous energy; • Specific procedural steps for the placement, removal and transfer of lockout devices or tagout devices and the responsibility for them; and • Specific requirements for testing a machine or equipment to determine and verify the effectiveness of lockout devices, tagout devices, and other energy control measures.
  53. 53. Written Programs Overview Bloodborne Pathogens Control Plan Emergency Action Plan Fire Prevention Plan Hazard Communication Plan Respiratory Protection Plan Lockout/Tagout Plan Q&A Agenda
  54. 54. Our Key Message Focus on Six Core OSHA Required Written Programs
  55. 55. OSHA Written Programs Remember to review and update each plan on a regular basis. If you change your plan, you will need to re-train employees on the changes. Ensure that the plan is implemented and actually reflects the day-to-day operations at your facility.
  56. 56. Thank You For Attending! Request a Free Program Review: http://info.triumvirate.com/osha Call Us! 1-888-834-9697 www.triumvirate.com Contact Rick Foote: rfoote@triumvirate.com
  • KyleClements3

    Jul. 5, 2016

This presentation dives into six of the core OSHA regulations that must exist in written form. These programs include: Bloodborne Pathogens, Emergency Action, Fire Prevention, Hazard Communication, Respiratory Protection, Lockout/Tagout. Find out what needs to be included in these written programs to stay compliant.

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