2ContentsLesson 1: Reading Fiction. .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . ...
Consider120  Lesson 6  •  Reading DramaShare and LearnPygmalionDRAW CONCLUSIONSHow does Mrs. Higginsshow that she thinks h...
Lesson 6  •  Reading Drama  121Share and LearnTONE What is the tone ofthe interaction betweenthe characters?Higgins: (deep...
122  Lesson 6  •  Reading DramaMrs. Higgins: How does your housekeeper get on with her? Higgins: Mrs. Pearce? Oh, she’s jo...
Lesson 6  •  Reading Drama  123Share and Learn25  Pickering: We’re always talking Eliza.   Higgins: Teaching Eliza.   Pick...
124  Lesson 6  •  Reading DramaFIGURATIVE VS. LITERALLANGUAGE An idiom is atype of figurative language.Its meaning is diff...
Lesson 6  •  Reading Drama  125Share and LearnAnchor Standard Discussion QuestionsDiscuss the following questions with you...
Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 7
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Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 7

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The total CCGPS package, built from the ground up—in full color.

Reading and writing lessons that are genre-specific and differentiated enable learners to meet the rigors of the CCGPS.

Georgia Common Core ELA Coach has been built from the ground up using an integrated approach that suits the philosophy of the Common Core Georgia Performance Standards. Both comprehensive and easy to use, it provides grade-level-appropriate content at a new depth of instruction.

Student texts are organized around reading and writing genres and cover all CCGPS in logical clusters, in the context of reading selections or examples of writing types. Reading lessons use modeled passages and writing and language units use 'mentor texts' to exemplify and teach skills. All lessons are structured around the research-proven model of gradual release, including explicit teacher-led instruction, collaborative peer work, and independent practice.

Georgia Common Core Coach delivers:

Clear lessons to help your students master achievements emphasized by
the CCGPS, including expectations for reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language conventions
Anchor standards set the instructional path toward College and Career Readiness (CCR)

Grade-specific CCGPS define cumulative progression and end-of-year requirements; CCR anchor standards define cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that students must meet if they are to find success in college or workforce training programs.

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Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 7

  1. 1. 2ContentsLesson 1: Reading Fiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Listen.and.Learn Henry.Speaks.Out./.Peace.Will.Be.My.Applause . . . . . . . . 6Share.and.Learn Ready.to.Serve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Read.On.Your.Own The.Mystery.of.the.Tides. . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 2: Writing Responses to Literature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191. Get.Ready:.Brainstorm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292. Organize:.Supporting.Evidence.and.Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323. Draft:.Showing.Clear.Relationships.Between.Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344. Peer.Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365. Revise:.Using.Complex.Sentences.for.Effect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406. Edit:.Eliminating.Wordiness.and.Redundancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46Lesson 3: Reading Literary Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47Listen.and.Learn excerpt.from.Narrative of the Life of FrederickDouglass, an American Slave./.Reconstruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48Share.and.Learn Blood,.Toil,.Tears.and.Sweat:.Address.to.Parliament.on.May.13th,.1940./.WW.II:.British.Home.Front. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60Read.On.Your.Own From.Awful.Rail.to.Awesome.Trail:.A.Community.Proposal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 4: Writing Personal Narratives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 691. Get.Ready:.Brainstorm.a.Topic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 752. Organize:.Introduction,.Body.Paragraphs,.Descriptive.Details,.and.Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 783. Draft:.Using.Transition.Words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804. Peer.Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 825. Revise:.Using.Complex.Sentences.to.Express.Ideas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866. Edit:.Using.Commas.and.Coordinate.Adjectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 887. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92Common CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RL.7.1; RL.7.2; RL.7.3; RL.7.4;RL.7.6; RL.7.9; RL.7.10;SL.7.1; L.7.4.a, d,W.7.1.a−e;W.7.4;W.7.5;W7.6;W.7.9.a;W.7.10; SL.7.1;L.7.1.b; L.7.3.a; L.7.4.c; L.7.6RI.7.1; RI.7.2; RI.7.3; RI.7.4;RI.7.5; RI.7.6; RI.7.8; RI.7.9;RI.7.10; SL.7.1; L.7.5.c;RH.6-8.1; RH.6-8.6; RH.6-8.10W.7.3.a−e;W.7.4;W.7.5;W.7.6;W.7.10; SL.7.1; L.7.1.b;L.7.2.a; L.7.3.a; L.7.4.a;L.7.5.b; L.7.6CC12_ELA_G7_SE_FM.indd 2 5/16/12 2:22 PM
  2. 2. Consider120  Lesson 6  •  Reading DramaShare and LearnPygmalionDRAW CONCLUSIONSHow does Mrs. Higginsshow that she thinks herselfto be smarter than her sonand Pickering?by George Bernard ShawCast of CharactersHenry HigginsMrs. Higgins (Henrys mother)PickeringThis play was published just before the beginning of World War I,a time when the rigid British social class system was beginningto unravel. Henry Higgins is a rich professor and scientist oflanguages. His friend, Colonel Pickering, is a linguist of Indiandialects. Higgins bets Pickering that he can transform ElizaDoolittle, a girl of low social standing chosen off the street, intoa woman who can be passed off as a high-class duchess. Theexperiment goes well, and Higgins is able to fool his wealthy socialpeers. His mother, Mrs. Higgins, has her doubts. This scene takesplace in Mrs. Higgins’s elegant home.from Act IIIHiggins: (eagerly) Well? Is Eliza presentable? (He swoops on hismother and drags her to the ottoman, where she sits down inEliza’s place with her son on her left.)Pickering returns to his chair on her right.Mrs. Higgins: You silly boy, of course she’s not presentable. She’s a triumph of your art and of her dressmaker’s; but if you suppose for a moment that she doesn’t give herself away in every sentence she utters, you must be perfectly cracked about her.   Pickering: But don’t you think something might be done? I mean something to eliminate the sanguinary1 element from her conversation.   Mrs. Higgins: Not as long as she is in Henry’s hands. 5  Higgins: (aggrieved) Do you mean that my language is improper?   Mrs. Higgins: No, dearest: it would be quite proper—say on a canal barge; but it would not be proper for her at a garden party.1sanguinary  rough, savagePygmalionHow are the dramatic structures of Romeo and Juliet andPygmalion similar and different?fromCC12_ELA_G7_SE_L06 120 5/10/12 5:30 PM
  3. 3. Lesson 6  •  Reading Drama  121Share and LearnTONE What is the tone ofthe interaction betweenthe characters?Higgins: (deeply injured) Well I must say— Pickering: (interrupting him) Come, Higgins: you must learn to know yourself. I haven’t heard such language as yours since we used to review the volunteers in Hyde Park twenty years ago.   Higgins: (sulkily) Oh, well, if you say so, I suppose I don’t always talk like a bishop. 10  Mrs. Higgins: (quieting Henry with a touch) Colonel Pickering: will you tell me what is the exact state of things in Wimpole Street?   Pickering: (cheerfully: as if this completely changed the subject) Well, I have come to live there with Henry. We work together at my Indian dialects; and we think it more convenient—   Mrs. Higgins: Quite so. I know all about that: it’s an excellent arrangement. But where does this girl live?   Higgins: With us, of course. Where would she live?   Mrs. Higgins: But on what terms? Is she a servant? If not, what is she? 15  Pickering: (slowly) I think I know what you mean, Mrs. Higgins.   Higgins: Well, dash me if I do! I’ve had to work at the girl every day for months to get her to her present pitch. Besides, she’s useful. She knows where my things are, and remembers my appointments and so forth. CHARACTERIZATIONHow do Mrs. Higginsand Pickering insultProfessor Higgins?SETTING SHAPES PLOTHow do Higgins’s socialstatus and bachelorhoodas well as the era in whichhe lives make the questionof Eliza living in hishome a big, potentiallyscandalous issue?CC12_ELA_G7_SE_L06 121 5/10/12 5:31 PM
  4. 4. 122  Lesson 6  •  Reading DramaMrs. Higgins: How does your housekeeper get on with her? Higgins: Mrs. Pearce? Oh, she’s jolly glad to get so much taken off her hands; for before Eliza came, she used to have to find things and remind me of my appointments. But she’s got some silly bee in her bonnet about Eliza. She keeps saying, “You don’t think, sir”: doesn’t she, Pick?   Pickering: Yes: that’s the formula. “You don’t think, sir.” That’s the end of every conversation about Eliza. 20  Higgins: As if I ever stop thinking about the girl and her confounded vowels and consonants. I’m worn out, thinking about her, and watching her lips and her teeth and her tongue, not to mention her soul, which is the quaintest of the lot.   Mrs. Higgins: You certainly are a pretty pair of babies, playing with your live doll.   Higgins: Playing! The hardest job I ever tackled: make no mistake about that, mother. But you have no idea how frightfully interesting it is to take a human being and change her into a quite different human being by creating a new speech for her. It’s filling up the deepest gulf that separates class from class and soul  from soul.   Pickering: (drawing his chair closer to Mrs. Higgins and bendingover to her eagerly) Yes: it’s enormously interesting. I assure you, Mrs. Higgins, we take Eliza very seriously. Every week—every day almost—there is some new change. (closer again) We keep records of every stage—dozens of gramophone  disks and photographs—   Higgins: (assailing her at the other ear) Yes, by George: it’s the most absorbing experiment I ever tackled. She regularly fills our lives up; doesn’t she, Pick? POINT OF VIEW Howdoes Mrs. Higgins mostlikely feel about Eliza? Circlethe details that help youdetermine her point of view.CC12_ELA_G7_SE_L06 122 5/10/12 5:31 PM
  5. 5. Lesson 6  •  Reading Drama  123Share and Learn25  Pickering: We’re always talking Eliza.   Higgins: Teaching Eliza.   Pickering: Dressing Eliza.   Mrs. Higgins: What!   Higgins: Inventing new Elizas. (Higgins and Pickering, speaking together.)30  Higgins: You know, she has the most extraordinary quickness of ear:  Pickering: I assure you, my dear Mrs. Higgins, that girl  Higgins: just like a parrot. I’ve tried her with every  Pickering: is a genius. She can play the piano quite beautifully.  Higgins: possible sort of sound that a human being can make—35  Pickering: We have taken her to classical concerts and to music  Higgins: Continental dialects, African dialects, Hottentot  Pickering: halls; and it’s all the same to her: she plays everything  Higgins: clicks, things it took me years to get hold of; and  Pickering: she hears right off when she comes home, whether it’s40  Higgins: she picks them up like a shot, right away, as if she had  Pickering: Beethoven and Brahms or Lehar and Lionel Morickton;  Higgins: been at it all her life.  Pickering: though six months ago, she’d never as much as touched a piano.  Mrs. Higgins: (putting her fingers in her ears, as they are bythis time shouting one another down with an intolerable noise) Sh—sh—sh—sh! (They stop.) 45  Pickering: I beg your pardon. (He draws his chair backapologetically.) DENOTATION ANDCONNOTATION Listsome of the words thatHiggins and Pickering useto describe Eliza and thatconnote the way they feelabout her.CHARACTERIZATIONHow do Higgins andPickering feel about Eliza?MAIN IDEA Pickering andHiggins banter at the sametime.What is the main ideaof both speeches?DRAMATIC STRUCTUREHow do the stage directionstell you that the menare trying to convinceMrs. Higgins of something?CC12_ELA_G7_SE_L06 123 5/10/12 5:31 PM
  6. 6. 124  Lesson 6  •  Reading DramaFIGURATIVE VS. LITERALLANGUAGE An idiom is atype of figurative language.Its meaning is different fromthe literal meaning of thewords. In paragraph 46,the phrase edgeways is anidiom. Use context clues tofigure out its meaning.STORY ELEMENTS Howdoes Eliza’s presence inHiggins’s home affectthe plot?Higgins: Sorry. When Pickering starts shouting nobody can get a word in edgeways.   Mrs. Higgins: Be quiet, Henry. Colonel Pickering: don’t you realize that when Eliza walked into Wimpole Street, something walked in with her? Pickering: Her father did. But Henry soon got rid of him.   Mrs. Higgins: It would have been more to the point if her mother had. But as her mother didn’t something else did. 50  Pickering: But what?   Mrs. Higgins: (unconsciously dating herself by the word) A problem.   Pickering: Oh, I see. The problem of how to pass her off as a lady.   Higgins: I’ll solve that problem. I’ve half solved it already.   Mrs. Higgins: No, you two infinitely stupid male creatures: the problem of what is to be done with her afterwards. CC12_ELA_G7_SE_L06 124 5/10/12 5:31 PM
  7. 7. Lesson 6  •  Reading Drama  125Share and LearnAnchor Standard Discussion QuestionsDiscuss the following questions with your peer group. Then record your answers in thespace provided.1. What is the author’s attitude toward Professor Higgins and his social experiment? Whichof the three characters do you think the author sympathizes with most? Support youranswer with specific language from the play.2. Reread the banter between Higgins and Pickering, starting with paragraph 30. What doesthis interaction reveal about the two characters’ personalities? Support your answer withdetails from the play.CC12_ELA_G7_SE_L06 125 5/10/12 5:31 PM

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