Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 3

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The total CCGPS package, built from the ground up—in full color.

Reading and writing lessons that are genre-specific and differentiated enable learners to meet the rigors of the CCGPS.

Georgia Common Core ELA Coach has been built from the ground up using an integrated approach that suits the philosophy of the Common Core Georgia Performance Standards. Both comprehensive and easy to use, it provides grade-level-appropriate content at a new depth of instruction.

Student texts are organized around reading and writing genres and cover all CCGPS in logical clusters, in the context of reading selections or examples of writing types. Reading lessons use modeled passages and writing and language units use 'mentor texts' to exemplify and teach skills. All lessons are structured around the research-proven model of gradual release, including explicit teacher-led instruction, collaborative peer work, and independent practice.

Georgia Common Core Coach delivers:

Clear lessons to help your students master achievements emphasized by
the CCGPS, including expectations for reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language conventions
Anchor standards set the instructional path toward College and Career Readiness (CCR)

Grade-specific CCGPS define cumulative progression and end-of-year requirements; CCR anchor standards define cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that students must meet if they are to find success in college or workforce training programs.

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Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 3

  1. 1. EnglishLanguageArts 3CommonCoreCoachFirst EditionGEORGIA
  2. 2. 2ContentsLesson 1: Reading Myths and Fables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Listen and Learn The Wind and the Sun / Daylight. . . . . . . . . . . 6Share and Learn How the Camel Got His Hump. . . . . . . . . . . . 12Read On Your Own Tiger Gets His Stripes. . . Online HandoutLesson 2: Reading Short Stories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19Listen and Learn The Adventure of the Three Students. . . . . . 20Share and Learn The Adventure of the Red-Headed League. . 28Read On Your Own The Case of theStolen Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 3: Writing Fictional Narratives. . . . . . . . . . . . 371. Get Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432. Organize: Beginning, Middle, and Ending. . . . . . . . . . . . 463. Draft: Writing a Good Ending. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484. Peer Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505. Revise: Using Time-Order Words and Phrases. . . . . . . . . . 546. Edit: Using Nouns and Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60Lesson 4: Reading Historical Nonfiction . . . . . . . . . . 61Listen and Learn Ellis and Angel: Islands of Hope. . . . . . . . . . . 62Share and Learn Sarah Winnemucca / A Great Woman. . . . . . 70Read On Your Own Harriet Tubman . . . . . . . Online HandoutCommon CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RL.3.1; RL.3.2; RL.3.4; RL.3.6;RL.3.7; RL.3.10; RF.3.4.a, c;SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3; L.3.4.aRL.3.1; RL.3.3; RL.3.4; RL.3.5;RL.3.7; RL.3.9; RL.3.10;RF.3.4.a, c; SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3;L.3.4.aRF.3.3.d;W.3.3.a–d;W.3.4;W.3.5;W.3.6;W.3.8;W.3.10;SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.1.a–f; L.3.3;L.3.4.a; L.3.6RI.3.1; RI.3.2; RI.3.4; RI.3.5;RI.3.6; RI.3.8; RI.3.9; RI.3.10;RF.3.4.a, c; SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3;L.3.4.aCC12_ELA_G3_SE_FM.indd 2 5/11/12 10:23 AM
  3. 3. 3Lesson 5: Writing Personal Narratives. . . . . . . . . . . . 791. Get Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852. Organize: Beginning, Middle, and Ending. . . . . . . . . . . . 883. Draft: Using Time-Order Words and Phrases . . . . . . . . . . 904. Peer Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 925. Revise: Using Sensory Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 966. Edit: Punctuating Dialogue, Using Possessives,and Spelling Correctly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 987. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102Lesson 6: Reading Drama. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103Listen and Learn A Garden to Share. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104Share and Learn A Mammoth Adventure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112Read On Your Own Attic Stardust. . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 7: Reading Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119Listen and Learn excerpt from “The Pied Piper of Hamelin”.120Share and Learn Shenandoah / The Wind / Autumn. . . . . . . . 126Read On Your Own Who Has Seen the Wind? / Afternoon ona Hill / From a Railway Carriage. . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 8: Reading Technical Texts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133Listen and Learn Using the Internet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134Share and Learn Migration of Loggerhead Turtles. . . . . . . . . 140Read On Your Own Swimming with Sharks. Online HandoutCommon CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RF.3.3.a, b, d;W.3.3.a–d;W.3.4;W.3.5;W.3.6;W.3.8;W.3.10; SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.2.c–g;L.3.3, L.3.3.a, b; L.3.4.b, c;L.3.6RL.3.1; RL.3.3; RL.3.4; RL.3.5;RL.3.6; RL.3.10; RF.3.4.a, c;SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3; L.3.4.aRL.3.1; RL.3.4; RL.3.5;RL.3.10; RF.3.4.a, c;SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3; L.3.4.aRI.3.1; RI.3.3; RI.3.4; RI.3.5;RI.3.7; RI.3.8; RI.3.10;RF.3.4.a, c; SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3;L.3.4.aCC12_ELA_G3_SE_FM.indd 3 5/11/12 10:23 AM
  4. 4. 4Lesson 9: Writing Informative/Explanatory Texts. 1471. Get Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1532. Organize: Main Idea, Supporting Details,and Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1583. Draft: Using Linking Words and Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1604. Peer Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1625. Revise: Using Literal and Nonliteral Language. . . . . . . . 1666. Edit: Sentence Structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1687. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172Lesson 10: Reading Scientific Nonfiction . . . . . . . . 173Listen and Learn Howling Wind, Swirling Snow. . . . . . . . . . . 174Share and Learn Giants of the Grassland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180Read On Your Own Plants That Fight Back!. Online HandoutLesson 11: Writing Opinion Pieces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1871. Get Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1932. Organize: Opinion, Supporting Reasons,and Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1963. Draft: Using Linking Words and Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1984. Peer Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2005. Revise: Using Comparatives and Superlatives. . . . . . . . . 2046. Edit: Capitalization and Punctuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2067. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210Writing Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221Common CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RF.3.3.c;W.3.2.a–d;W.3.4;W.3.5;W.3.6;W.3.7;W.3.8;W.3.10; SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.1.h, i;L.3.2.g; L.3.3; L.3.4.d;L.3.5.a, cRI.3.1; RI.3.2; RI.3.3; RI.3.4;RI.3.5; RI.3.7; RI.3.8; RI.3.10;RF.3.4.a, c; SL.3.1.a–d; L.3.3;L.3.4.aW.3.1.a–d;W.3.4;W.3.5;W.3.6;W.3.10; SL.3.1.a–d;L.3.1.g; L.3.2.a–d; L.3.3;L.3.5.b, cCC12_ELA_G3_SE_FM.indd 4 5/11/12 10:23 AM
  5. 5. Lesson1ReadingMythsandFablesHow can made-up storieswith imaginary charactersteach important things aboutreal life?ESSENTIAL QUESTIONLook at thispicture of the night sky.What do you think peoplethought about the moonbefore scientistsexplained it?Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 5
  6. 6. Listen and LearnFABLE A fable is a story thatteaches a lesson. It featuresanimals or things in naturethat behave like people.Fables are imaginary, but theyinclude things that are true tolife.This story begins with animaginary argument betweenthe Wind and the Sun. Inwhat way is their argumenttrue to life?ASKING AND ANSWERINGQUESTIONS Asking yourselfquestions and looking for theanswers as you read can helpyou understand a story better.On this page you might ask,“What are the Wind andthe Sun arguing about?”What other questions couldyou ask yourself about whatis happening or what thecharacters are like? Look foranswers to those questionsas you read further.CONTEXT CLUES You canoften figure out a word youdon’t know by looking forhints, or context clues, in thewords around it. Look at theword defeated in paragraph8.What context clues can youfind that help you understandthe meaning of defeated?What happens when two forces of nature—the Wind and the Sun—get into an argument?In what ways are the Wind and the Sun likereal people?ConsiderOne day the Wind and the Sun werearguing over which of the two was stronger.“I’m a lot stronger than you,” said the Sun.“Don’t be silly,” said the Wind. “I’m trulymore powerful!”The friends argued but could not agree.Suddenly, a man wearing a dark cape came walkingdown the road.“Here’s how we can end our quarrel,” the Sunsaid. “The one of us who can make that man takeoff his cape is the stronger. You go first.” Then theSun hid behind a cloud.“That’s easy,” said the Wind. “I’ve blown hats offmany people.”The Wind whipped itself up and blew against theman. This made the traveler grip his cape. The Winddecided to blow even harder, but then the man heldhis cape more tightly.Finally, the Wind gave up. “I’ve puffed with allmy might,” he said in a defeated voice. “I’m all outof breath.”15adapted from a fable by AesopandtheSun6 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables6 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables
  7. 7. Listen and Learn“It’s not so easy, is it?” asked the Sun with achuckle. “Now it’s my turn.”The Sun beamed a few rays on the man, and heopened his cape. When the man stopped at a riverfor a drink, the Sun shone the full power of its heat.Soon the man was dripping with sweat. At last, hetook off the cape and tossed it on the grass.“That settles it. I’m stronger! I have won ourargument,” said the Sun. Then, more meekly, theSun asked, “Can we still be friends?”Moral: A gentle way often succeedswhere a forceful way fails.10MORAL “The Wind and theSun” is a fable. It ends witha moral, or a short lessonabout life.What lesson doesthe Wind learn in this fable?How could you use thislesson in your own life?ILLUSTRATIONSIllustrations, or pictures,can often help tell a story.A picture can show moredetails about the charactersand help you understandthem better.What do youlearn about the Wind and theSun in this picture?Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 7
  8. 8. Listen and LearnWhy does the sun come and go from the sky?Why do we have both daylight and darkness?ConsiderUSING ILLUSTRATIONSPictures can show whatcharacters look like andhow they behave. Studyinga story’s illustrations canhelp you better understanda character’s personality andactions. Look at the picturesof Tavu on these pages.Whatdo the details in the picturestell you about Tavu? Howdo these pictures help tellthe story?MYTH A myth is a storythat tells how somethingin nature came to be.Whatdo you think this myth willtell about?POINT OF VIEW Point ofview shows who is tellingthe story. In this story, thenarrator is telling the story.Who is the narrator ofthis story? Is it one of thecharacters or someone whois not part of the story? Howdo you know?DaylightA long time ago, there were not many hoursof daylight. Nights were long, and days were veryshort. The Paiute people did not have enough timeto hunt before it got dark.The rabbit Tavu wanted to help them, so hedecided to go to the place where daylight began.He packed up his bow and his arrows and set outon a journey east toward the sun.Tavu traveled far. He wandered through forestsand hopped on stones to cross rivers. At last hecame to the edge of the world, where the sun lived.He hid behind a large rock that night and waited forthe sun to come out in the morning.As soon as the sun began to rise, Tavu raised hisbow and an arrow. He took aim and shot. The arrowdid not get near the sun at all. It burned up before itgot close. Tavu tried again. He walked closer to thesun, shooting arrows as he went. Every arrow burstinto flames before it reached its mark.Finally, there were only two arrows left. Tavu wasupset. He sat on the ground and began to weep.He cried so much that his tears soaked his lasttwo arrows.15adapted from a Paiute myth8 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables8 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables
  9. 9. Listen and LearnTavu gathered his strength. He took aim againand shot one of his last two arrows. He smiledwhen he saw how close the arrow came. It almosthit the sun! Wet with tears, the arrow did not burnup. He let his last arrow fly. This time, it struck thetarget. The sun fell to the ground.Tavu moved quickly. He cut the sun into piecesand threw one piece into the sky.“Go higher than before and make the dayslonger,” he commanded. Then he ran away as fastas he could.The angry sun tried to chase Tavu. Every timeit came close, the clever rabbit hid. At last the sungave up. Tavu watched it rise higher and higherinto the sky. He was very pleased.“Now the day will be longer,” he said.When Tavu returned, the Paiute people cheered.They held a sun dance in his honor. They beggedTavu to go fight the sun again.“We want daylight all the time,” they cheered.“No,” said Tavu. “You need night as well as day.You must have time for sleep.”And from that day to this, the world has had bothdaylight and darkness so that people have time towork and to rest.10RETELLING One way toenjoy a story is to retell it,or tell it again in your ownwords.To retell this story, firstthink about the main idea:Tavu the rabbit makes thesun stay up longer so peoplewill have more daylight.Then think about the detailsthat show how Tavu doesthis.What details would beimportant to include whenretelling the story?THEME This myth explainsthat in most parts of theworld, the day is dividedfairly equally into daylightand darkness.The story alsohas a theme.A theme is themessage or truth about lifethat a story suggests. Onetheme of this story is that asmall person can make a bigdifference, if the person isbrave and determined. Howdo Tavu’s actions in the storysupport this theme?DETAILS Details giveinformation.They tell who,what, when, where, and how.One detail in the story is thatTavu’s arrows got wet whenhe cried.Why is the wetarrow able to hit the sun?Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 9
  10. 10. Comprehension CheckLook back at “The Wind and the Sun” and “Daylight.” Fill in the chartto answer questions about each story.“The Wind andthe Sun”“Daylight”Type of StoryIs this story amyth or a fable?Characters inthe StoryWho are thecharacters inthe story?Purpose ofthe StoryWhat is thepurpose ofthe story?10 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables
  11. 11. Listen and LearnVocabularyUse the word map below to help you define and use one of thehighlighted vocabulary words from the Share and Learn reading oranother word your teacher assigns you.howling saddle fetchidle whistling reflectionMy wordSynonyms AntonymsDefinition Other formsMy sentenceLesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 11
  12. 12. Share and LearnDETAILS Why does theCamel live in the desert?CONTEXT CLUES Findthe word fetch inparagraph 4. Circlenearby words that canhelp you understandwhat fetch means.USING ILLUSTRATIONSStudy the picture onthis page.What do youthink the Horse, theDog, and the Ox thinkof the Camel?How do different animals work for Man in this story?Why is the camel so well suited to living in the desert?Consideradapted from a fable by Rudyard KiplingIn the beginning of years, when the world was sonew and all, and the Animals were just beginning towork for Man, there was a Camel, and he lived in themiddle of a Howling Desert because he did not want towork; and besides, he was a Howler himself. So he atesticks and thorns . . . and when anybody spoke to himhe said “Humph!” Just “Humph!” and no more.Presently the Horse came to him on Mondaymorning, with a saddle on his back and a bit in hismouth, and said, “Camel, O Camel, come out and trotlike the rest of us.”“Humph!” said the Camel; and the Horse wentaway and told the Man.Presently the Dog came to him, with a stick in hismouth, and said, “Camel, O Camel, come and fetchand carry like the rest of us.”“Humph!” said the Camel; and the Dog went awayand told the Man.Presently the Ox came to him, with the yoke on hisneck, and said, “Camel, O Camel, come and plow likethe rest of us.”“Humph!” said the Camel; and the Ox went awayand told the Man.1512 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables
  13. 13. Share and LearnAt the end of the day the Man called the Horse andthe Dog and the Ox together, and said, “Three, O Three,I’m very sorry (with the world so new-and-all); butthat Humph-thing in the Desert can’t work, or hewould have been here by now, so I am going to leavehim alone, and you must work double-time to makeup for it.”That made the Three very angry (with the worldso new-and-all) . . . and the Camel came chewing onmilkweed most ’scruciatingly idle, and laughed atthem. Then he said “Humph!” and went away again.Presently there came along the Djinn1in charge ofAll Deserts, rolling in a cloud of dust (Djinns alwaystravel that way.) . . .“Djinn of All Deserts,” said the Horse, “is it right forany one to be idle, with the world so new-and-all?”“Certainly not,” said the Djinn.1Djinn in myths, a spirit that can appear in animal or human form10POINT OF VIEW Is thisfable told by a storycharacter or by a narratorwho is outside the storyand knows all about thecharacters? Explain howyou can tell.ASKING ANDANSWERINGQUESTIONS This storyhas several differentcharacters.Whatquestions could youask yourself about thecharacters and how theyact toward each other?DETAILS What doesthe Camel’s refusalto work mean for theother animals?Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 13
  14. 14. CONTEXT CLUES Lookat the word reflection onthis page. Circle nearbywords that can helpyou understand whatreflection means.ASKING ANDANSWERINGQUESTIONS In thisstory, both the Cameland the Djinn haveimportant roles.Whatquestion could you askyourself about the roleof the Djinn in this partof the story?“Well,” said the Horse, “there’s a thing in the middleof your Howling Desert (and he’s a Howler himself)with a long neck and long legs, and he hasn’t done astroke of work since Monday morning. He won’t trot.”“Whew!” said the Djinn, whistling, “that’s myCamel, for all the gold in Arabia! What does he sayabout it?”“He says ‘Humph!’” said the Dog; “and he won’tfetch and carry.”“Does he say anything else?”“Only ‘Humph!’; and he won’t plow,” said the Ox.“Very good,” said the Djinn. “I’ll humph him if youwill kindly wait a minute.”The Djinn rolled himself up in his dust-cloak, andtook a bearing across the desert, and found the Camelmost ’scruciatingly idle, looking at his own reflectionin a pool of water.“My long and bubbling friend,”said the Djinn, “what’s this I hearof your doing no work, with theworld so new-and-all?”“Humph!” said the Camel.152014 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables
  15. 15. The Djinn sat down, with his chin in his hand, andbegan to think a Great Magic, while the Camel lookedat his own reflection in the pool of water.“You’ve given the Three extra work ever sinceMonday morning, all on account of your ’scruciatingidleness,” said the Djinn . . . with his chin in his hand.“Humph!” said the Camel.“I shouldn’t say that again if I were you,” said theDjinn; “you might say it once too often. Bubbles, I wantyou to work.”And the Camel said “Humph!” again; but no soonerhad he said it than he saw his back, that he was soproud of, puffing up and puffing up into a great biglolloping humph.“Do you see that?” said the Djinn. “That’s your veryown humph that you’ve brought upon your very ownself by not working. Today is Thursday, and you’vedone no work since Monday, when the work began.Now you are going to work.”“How can I,” said the Camel, “with this humph onmy back?”25Share and LearnDETAILS Both “TheWind and the Sun” andthis story have a man asone of the characters.How are these humancharacters the same?How are they different?USING ILLUSTRATIONSLook at the illustrationson this page. How dothe details in theseillustrations help youunderstand the story?Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 15
  16. 16. RETELLING Think aboutthe characters and eventsin this story.What detailswould you include in aretelling of this story?MORAL The moralof this story is that ifyou avoid work andresponsibility, you willsuffer the consequences.How do the Camel’sactions in the storysupport this moral?“That’s made a-purpose,” said the Djinn, “allbecause you missed those three days. You will be ableto work now for three days without eating, because youcan live on your humph; and don’t you ever say I neverdid anything for you. Come out of the Desert and go tothe Three, and behave. Humph yourself!”And the Camel humphed himself, humph and all,and went away to join the Three. And from that dayto this the Camel always wears a humph (we call it“hump” now, not to hurt his feelings), but he has neveryet caught up with the three days that he missed at thebeginning of the world, and he has never yet learnedhow to behave.Camels are useful because they can carryheavy loads for many miles without gettingtired. However, they are often stubborn anddifficult for people to manage.The camel can go without eatingfor a long time because its humpstores extra fat. It can burn thisfat to get energy.16 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables
  17. 17. Share and LearnAnchor Standard Discussion QuestionsDiscuss the following questions with your peer group. Then record youranswers in the space provided.1. Do you think the Camel’s punishment was fair? Support your answerwith details from the text.2. Now that the Camel has a hump, how might his behavior be different?How might it be the same as it was at the beginning of time? Supportyour answer with details from the text.Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables 17
  18. 18. Read another fable, “Tiger Gets His Stripes,” independently. Applywhat you learned in this lesson and check your understanding.Read On Your OwnComprehension Check1. In “How the Camel Got His Hump,” the Camel often says, “Humph!”Why does he say this instead of explaining why he will not work?2. Compare how the Man and the Djinn deal with the Camel. Which wayis better? Why?3. In what ways are the Djinn from the fable “How the Camel Got HisHump” and the rabbit, Tavu, from the myth “Daylight” similar? In whatways are they different?Share and Learn18 Lesson 1 • Reading Myths and Fables

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