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Mathematical Model to Predict Leader Self-Awareness and Effective Conflict Management in Manufacturing Companies

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Self-awareness and effective conflict management were subjected into evaluation, this was to monitor the extend at which such managerial concept experienced impact from positive and negative condition, various dimension that were observed to express relationship were involved to evaluate different rate of effects on leader self – awareness in manufacturing companies, other influential parameters were conflict management. These variables were observed to relate through increase collaboration as a result generate improved communication between customers and staffs for better efficiency and productivity in manufacturing companies. The study expresses various output through simulated parameters at different period and conditions, the derived simulation values were subjected to model validations, and both parameters developed favorable fits, the study expressed its significance by monitoring leader self-awareness in manufacturing companies, these were evaluated through assessment of effective conflict management to generates improved communication between customers and staffs in manufacturing companies.

Keywords: Mathematical model, leader self-awareness, and manufacturing companies.

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Mathematical Model to Predict Leader Self-Awareness and Effective Conflict Management in Manufacturing Companies

  1. 1. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (ISSN: 2636-5480) Vol. 2(1): 001 - 010, August 2018 Available online: http://www.triplearesjournal.org/jmd Copyright ©2018 Triple A Research Journal Full length Research Paper Mathematical Model to Predict Leader Self-Awareness and Effective Conflict Management in Manufacturing Companies 1*Eluozo SN and 2Ukpong Uwem Johnson 1Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, Gregory University, Uturu, Abia State, Nigeria 2Department of Management Sciences, Akwa Ibom State University Corresponding author: Eluozo S.N. Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, Gregory University Uturu, Abia State, Nigeria. E-mail address: ndusolo2018@gmail.com ABSTRACT Self-awareness and effective conflict management were subjected into evaluation, this was to monitor the extend at which such managerial concept experienced impact from positive and negative condition, various dimension that were observed to express relationship were involved to evaluate different rate of effects on leader self – awareness in manufacturing companies, other influential parameters were conflict management. These variables were observed to relate through increase collaboration as a result generate improved communication between customers and staffs for better efficiency and productivity in manufacturing companies. The study expresses various output through simulated parameters at different period and conditions, the derived simulation values were subjected to model validations, and both parameters developed favorable fits, the study expressed its significance by monitoring leader self-awareness in manufacturing companies, these were evaluated through assessment of effective conflict management to generates improved communication between customers and staffs in manufacturing companies. Keywords: Mathematical model, leader self-awareness, and manufacturing companies. INTRODUCTION Organizations has over time realized that success takes more than intellectual excellence and that we need another sort of skills just to survive and certainly to thrive in the increasingly dynamic work environment the competencies of emotional intelligence such as self-awareness, empathy, social skills are consciously taken into consideration, and more-so, literatures on effective and efficient performance and management of organization has assumed multiple dimensions Johnson et al. (2018) therefore with recourse to the current organizational dynamics that range from intellectual excellence and other measures such as self awareness, empathy and social skills, the need to empirically examine the influence of self-awareness in effective conflict management is highly needed. Therefore, the study is aimed at with mathematical model examine the influence of self-awareness on increased collaboration and improved communication Literature review The underpinning theory for this study is the social learning theory. Social learning theory is a prime to organizational learning. The general statement of social learning theory is that cognitive and symbolic activities as well as self- regulatory nature of human interaction are important to learning, based on these facts we are using the social learning theory to explain the need for leader’s
  2. 2. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 Solo and Johnson 002 consciousness as regards emotional intelligence and effective conflict management. Several theories have come up with multiple theories on emotional intelligence, however most theories appear to include and focus on the same four main components of emotional intelligence: perception of once and others emotion, understanding and utilization of that knowledge (Ciarrochi et al., (2000). Goleman & Boyatzis, (2002) have proposed an inductively based theory of emotional intelligence which has been tested with emotional intelligence competence which has been tested with intelligence competent inventory (ECI). Both theories are similar in that they each propose awareness and regulation of emotion at the individual social level. Increased collaboration Collaboration works by integrating ideas set out by multiple people. The object is to find a creative solution acceptable to everyone. Collaboration, though useful, calls for a significant time commitment not appropriate to all conflicts. For example, a business owner should work collaboratively with the manager to establish policies, but collaborative decision-making regarding office supplies wastes time better spent on other activities. Jehn and Mannix, (2001). Contends that “conflict is a multi-dimensional construct” Rahim (2002) further stressed that management of conflict involves diagnosis and intervention. Proper diagnosis should measure the amount of conflict, style of handling interpersonal conflicts, sources of conflicts, organizational learning and effectiveness. Conflict management involves implementing strategies to limit the negative aspects of conflict and to increase the positive aspects of conflict at a level equal to or higher than where the conflict is taking place (David, 2013). It is not concerned with eliminating all conflict, conflict management as a concept, has been conventionally linked with conflict containment and settlement. In social life, conflicts do occur, but family members, friends and relatives manage them. Same form of conflict management should apply to organizations and to the top management. Conflict is prevalent to all social life; it is an inevitable part of living because it is related to situations of scares resources, division of functions, power relations and role-differentiation Gilbert (2005). Conflict management avoids conflicts to a great extent and thus also reduces the stress and tension of leader. No one likes to carry his tensions back home and if you fight with your staffs and other people, you are bound to feel uncomfortable and restless even at home. Increased collaboration: Increased collaboration involves participants working together on the same tasks, rather than in parallel on separates portions of task. However, Dillenbourg et al. (1996) note that some spontaneous division of labor may occur during collaboration. Thus, the distinction between the two is not necessarily clear-cut. According to Dillenbourg et al. (1996), in cooperation is only required for assembling partial results. Increased Collaboration is the best effective conflict management strategy according to Rabin (2002). This is because it delivers a win-win outcome. It is called a win-win approach. It does not require either side to give up a valued position. Rather, both sides honestly seek new and common higher grounds. This kind of problem-solving requires an atmosphere of trust and mutual respect, the surfacing of hidden agendas, and a genuine willingness on both sides for effective conflict management. Thomas & Kilmann (1974) collaborators are high in accommodation. They view integrative behavior as it requires the parties to think of the best interests of both sides rather than just their own. Nevertheless, Cahn and Abigail (2002) prefer not to describe a process, instead of focusing on the principles that the parties need to apply for a collaborative solution to occur. They define these as separating people from the problem, focusing on interests, brainstorming options and finding objective criteria on which to base decisions Cahn and Abigail (2007). They posit that parties need to demonstrate collaborative behaviors to achieve win-win outcomes. Leader Self-Awareness According to Goleman (1998) self-awareness refers to one’s capacity to know his internal states intuitive voice, preference and resources. A leader with self-awareness will have emotional awareness which is a state of recognizing his emotions and their effects. The leader with self-awareness knows his strength and weaknesses, and such has self-confidence which is a person’s sense of self- respect and capability. Self-awareness is the ability of an individual to sense the internal emotional emotions and feelings. Self-aware individuals are able to read their feelings and link them with what they think and act. It is also known as “emotional literacy: McGarvey, (1997). Self- awareness is used to regulate the rational and emotional mental processes in balanced ways to provide an emotional support for the rational mind to make logically correct and socially acceptable decisions and judgments (Tischler et al., 2002). Improved communication Improved communication has a big role to play in effective conflict management. It has been observed that poor communication most often results in misunderstandings and eventually conflicts. Communication has to be clear and precise for the avoidance of conflict. Improved communications, and the need for comprehensive supportive care, are recognized to lead to effective conflict management. The dissimilarity in the ideas and opinion of individuals results in a conflict. There is need for individual adjustment within the organization in other to avoid conflicts. Most conflict in the organization occurs as a result of lack of effective communication among the work force. And lack of information is also a major course of conflict in the organization. The types of communication also play a major role in the organization. Clear, concise,
  3. 3. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 003 Triple A Res. J. Multidisci. accurate and time communication of information from leaders will help to ease both the number and severity of conflicts and lead to improved communication in the organization. Conflict may be between managers and their staff, between team members, departments, or managers. Conflict may be expressed openly, but it may also be hidden, in the form of irritation, resentment, loss of morale and lack of commitment. Hidden conflict is easy to miss and therefore can be particularly damaging. If nothing is done to address the underlying issues, conflict may escalate - from gossip, backbiting and criticism to shouting matches, threats and possible violence. Such consequences can often be prevented by taking early action to address the issues. The following is focuses on steps for handling interpersonal conflict within the workforce, as opposed to conflict with customers, which requires a different form of resolution. It is imperative however to stressed that increased communication within the organization helps in enhancing the strength of the organization and to a greater extend increase the production of the organization. It is the job of an employee to meet the expectations of his manager, but if those expectations are misunderstood, conflict can arise. Managers need to spend time clearly communicating their goals to employees and then confirming those goals in writing. A manager should also encourage her employees to ask questions about their goals and hold regular meetings to discuss the goals and how best to reach them. Breakdown in Communication: If a department requires information from another department to do its job, and the second department does not respond to the request for information, a conflict can arise. Some interdepartmental disagreements might trigger a nonresponsive attitude that can quickly become an internal conflict. Another way of creating this sort of conflict is by giving a circular response such as an issue being perpetually "under review." When people or departments are late in responding to information requests, or they are withholding information on purpose, it is best to address the situation immediately with a personal meeting with both sides to resolve the situation. Misunderstanding the Information According to Robert (2008), internal conflict can sometimes arise as the result of a simple misunderstanding. One person may misunderstand information, and that can trigger a series of conflicts. To deal with this kind of situation, it is best to have the person admit her misunderstanding and work with the affected parties to remedy the situation. For example, if the production manager misunderstands the product manufacturing goals, then the sales manager may not have enough products to sell. Taking responsibility for a mistake can quickly defuse a potential organizational conflict. Leader Self-awareness and effective conflict management involves having a realistic assessment of one’s abilities. People who have this strength are aware of their strength and weaknesses, open to candid feedback from others, and are willing to learn from past experiences. This courage comes from certainty, through self- awareness about the individual capabilities, values and goals Davidson (2009). The theory tends to buttress the fact that self awareness has a lot to do with the effective ways of conflict management amongst individuals in the organization. Individual self-awareness also effectively contributes to improved employee’s ability in achieving organizational goals. Being self-aware also enables the employees to constantly remain conscious both as an individual and within groups in the organization. Dirette (2010) stressed that self-awareness is broken down into four levels of Arousal and attention, Sensory and motor, Cognitive and lastly Psychosocial. To them at the arousal and attention, to ideas developed or any arousal is either very slow or poor due to our inability to pay attention or respond with close concentration because of distracting surrounding us. The sensory and motor stage is where we can explain our sense of feeling such as movement, fatigue, satisfaction and more advance skills of processing our perceptions due to our developed competence to pay attention, comprehend and memorize. Leader-Member Exchange relationship is a leadership construct which evolved from the Vertical dyad linkage theory of Dansereau et al. (1975) that focused on the two- fold (dyadic) relationship between leaders and subordinates (Green, 2008). The theory explained that a leader develops a different quality of relationship with each of his subordinates and not a uniform relationship. Truckenbrodt, (2000), explains that Leader-Member Exchange relationship is a leadership construct which focuses on a two-way (dyadic) relationship between the leader (manager) and each of his subordinates (member). The theory posits that a manager or leader forms a different quality of relationship with each of his subordinates or the Rank-and-File officers, which tends to influence the Rank-and-File officers access to resources and performance (Graen and Uhl-Bien, 1991). This relationship extends beyond the terms of employment and job description. Such Leader-Member Exchange relationship may be high quality or low quality. The subordinates who enjoy a high-quality Leader-Member Exchange relationship are referred to as in-group members while the subordinates in a low-quality Leader- Member Exchange relationship are known as out-group members. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND 𝑑 𝑐 𝑑 𝑑𝑥 + 𝑉(𝑦)𝑐 𝑑 = (𝑦)𝑐 𝑑 𝑛 (1.0) Dividing equation (1.0) all through by 𝑐 𝑑 𝑛 we have 𝑐 𝑑 −𝑛 𝑑 𝑐 𝑑 𝑑𝑥 + 𝑣(𝑥)𝑐 𝑑 1−𝑛 = (𝑦) (1.1) Let P=𝑐 𝑑 1−𝑛 (1.2)
  4. 4. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 Solo and Johnson 004 𝑑𝑝 𝑑𝑦 = (1 − 𝑛)𝑐 𝑑 −𝑛 𝑑 𝑐 𝑑 𝑑𝑦 𝑐 𝑑 −𝑛 𝑑 𝑐 𝑑 𝑑𝑦 = 1 1−𝑛 𝑑𝑝 𝑑𝑦 (1.3) Substituting equation (1.2) and (1.3) into equation (1.1) we have that 1 1−𝑛 𝑑𝑝 𝑑𝑥 + 𝑉(𝑦)𝑝 = (𝑦) (1.4) Multiplied equation (1.4) all through by (1-n) 𝑑𝑝 𝑑𝑦 + 𝑉(𝑦)(1 − 𝑛)𝑝 = (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) (1.5) Equation (1.5) is linear in p. we applied the integrating factor method as follows: 𝐼. 𝐹 = 𝑒∫ 𝑝(𝑦) 𝑑𝑦 (1.6) Where 𝑝(𝑦) = 𝑉(𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) (1.7) Substituting equation (1.7) into (1.6) we have 𝐼. 𝐹 = 𝑒∫ 𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛) 𝑑𝑦 = 𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛) ∫ 𝑑𝑦 = 𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝐼. 𝐹 = 𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 (1.8) Multiplied all through equation (1.5) by equation (1.8) we have 𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑑𝑝 𝑑𝑦 + 𝑉(𝑦)(1 − 𝑛)𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑌 𝑝 =  (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛)𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑑 𝑑𝑥 (𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑝) = (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛)𝑒 𝑉(𝑌)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑑(𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑝) = (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛)𝑦𝑑𝑦 Integrating both sides we have ∫ 𝑑[𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑝] = (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) ∫ 𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑑𝑦 𝑒 𝑉(𝑌)(1−𝑛)𝑌 𝑝 = (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) ∫ 𝑒 𝑉(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑑𝑦 (1.9) But to integrate (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) ∫ 𝑒 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑥 𝑑𝑥 we let 𝐷 = 𝑉𝑢(𝑥)(1 − 𝑛)𝑥 (1.10) 𝑑𝐷 𝑑𝑥 = 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) So that 𝑑𝑥 = 𝑑𝐷 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛) (1.11) Substituting (1.10) and (1.11) into (1.9) we have 𝑒 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 𝑝 = (𝑦)(1 − 𝑛) ∫ 𝑒 𝐷 𝑑𝐷 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛) 𝑒 𝑢(𝑥)(1−𝑛)𝑥 𝑝 = (𝑦)(1−𝑛) 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛) 𝑒 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 + 𝐴 (1.12) Divide equation (1.12) all through by 𝑒 𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 we have 𝑝 = (𝑦) 𝑉𝑢(𝑦) + 𝐴𝑒−𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 (1.13) Substituting equation (1.2) into equation (1.13) we have 𝑐 𝑑 1−𝑛 = (𝑦) 𝑉𝑢(𝑦) + 𝐴𝑒−𝑉𝑢(𝑦)(1−𝑛)𝑦 METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY Mathematical model techniques were applied for the study, deterministic model techniques were applied, the variables were subjected into mathematical tools, these developed a system that generated governing equation, these were derived to produced model for the study, these predictive solution were also subjected to simulations were parameters were varied at different conditions base on the system, the derived simulation parameters will be compared with measured values from the fields for model validation. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS Tables 1 -6, Figure 1 -6 expresses the growth rise in self awareness from effective conflict management, the figure experienced linear exponential growth; this observation implies that the system evaluated the effect from conflict management as an influential dimension that determined the effectiveness of self Awareness in manufacturing companies. Moreso, the figures also express the pressure or positivity from increase collaboration and improved communication as a source for self awareness growth for efficiency of manufacturing companies in Port Harcourt, the dimensions were observed to establish higher percentage of influence for efficient self awareness in such manufacturing organization, such level of managerial conceptual framework were evaluated through the dimensions to express their various rate of efficiency in the growth rate of leader self awareness. The expansions or growth rate of self-awareness were observed at different periods, the figures though in linear exponential rate developed variations of values at different locations, the lowest parameter at different locations were as a result of linear declined of these dimensions in the system, even though they appear to be in linear phase. These expressions imply that these variables in the system will always determined the output of leader self awareness in manufacturing companies, the predictive parameters from derived model were subject to simulation, and both parameters developed faviourable fits for model validation.
  5. 5. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 005 Triple A Res. J. Multidisci. Table 1: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Period Leader Self Awareness Measured field Values 2 1.26E-02 1.10E-02 4 2.69E-02 2.30E-02 6 3.78E-02 3.50E-02 8 5.05E-02 4.71E-02 10 6.31E-02 5.91E-02 12 8.07E-02 7.11E-02 14 9.40E-02 8.32E-02 16 1.07E-01 9.53E-02 18 1.21E-01 1.07E-01 20 1.34E-01 1.19E-01 22 1.48E-01 1.31E-01 24 1.61E-01 1.44E-01 26 1.74E-01 1.56E-01 28 1.88E-01 1.68E-01 30 2.02E-01 1.80E-01 Table 2: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Period Leader Self Awareness Measured field Values 1 1.02E-02 0.0089607 2 2.04E-02 0.0188456 3 3.06E-02 0.0286589 4 4.04E-02 0.0384048 5 5.10E-02 0.0480875 6 6.12E-02 0.0577112 7 7.14E-02 0.0672801 8 8.16E-02 0.0767984 9 9.18E-02 0.0862703 10 1.02E-01 0.0957 11 1.22E-01 0.1050917 12 1.22E-01 0.1144496 13 1.36E-01 0.1237779 14 1.43E-01 0.1330808 15 1.53E-01 0.1423625 16 1.63E-01 0.1516272 17 1.73E-01 0.1608791 18 1.84E-01 0.1701224 19 1.94E-01 0.1793613 20 2.04E-01 0.1886 21 2.14E-01 0.1978427 22 2.24E-01 0.2070936 23 2.35E-01 0.2163569 24 2.45E-01 0.2256368 25 2.55E-01 0.2349375 26 2.66E-01 0.2442632 27 2.75E-01 0.2536181 28 2.86E-01 0.2630064 29 2.95E-01 0.2724323 30 3.06E-01 0.2819
  6. 6. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 Solo and Johnson 006 Table3: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Period Leader Self Awareness Measured field Values 3 2.72E-02 0.0258308 6 5.75E-02 0.0523664 9 8.61E-02 0.0786716 12 1.15E-01 0.1048112 15 1.43E-01 0.13085 18 1.72E-01 0.1568528 21 2.01E-01 0.1828844 24 2.29E-01 0.2090096 27 2.51E-01 0.2352932 30 2.87E-01 0.2618 33 3.15E-01 0.2885948 36 3.44E-01 0.3157424 39 3.72E-01 0.3433076 42 4.02E-01 0.3713552 45 4.31E-01 0.39995 Table 4: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Period Leader Self Awareness Measured Field Values 7 7.63E-02 0.07055 9 9.81E-02 0.09295 11 1.19E-01 0.11495 13 1.42E-01 0.13655 15 1.63E-01 0.15775 17 1.85E-01 0.17855 19 2.07E-01 0.19895 21 2.28E-01 0.21895 23 2.51E-01 0.23855 25 2.73E-01 0.25775 27 2.94E-01 0.27655 30 3.11E-01 0.304 Table 5: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Period Leader Self Awareness Measured Values 10 0.102 0.10006 15 0.153 0.15006 20 0.204 0.20006 25 0.255 0.25006 30 0.306 0.30006 35 0.357 0.35006 40 0.408 0.40006 45 0.459 0.45006 50 0.511 0.50006 55 0.561 0.55006 60 0.612 0.60006 65 0.663 0.65006 70 0.714 0.70006 75 0.765 0.75006 80 0.816 0.80006 85 0.867 0.85006 90 0.918 0.90006
  7. 7. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 007 Triple A Res. J. Multidisci. Table 6: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Period Leader Self Awareness Measured Values 10 0.109 0.1019 15 0.1635 0.1491625 20 0.218 0.1972 25 0.275 0.2459375 30 0.327 0.2953 35 0.355 0.3452125 40 0.436 0.3956 45 0.4905 0.4463875 50 0.545 0.4975 55 0.5995 0.5488625 60 0.654 0.6004 65 0.7085 0.6520375 70 0.763 0.7037 75 0.8175 0.7553125 80 0.868 0.8068 85 0.9265 0.8580875 90 0.981 0.9091 Figure 1: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period 0.00E+00 5.00E-02 1.00E-01 1.50E-01 2.00E-01 2.50E-01 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 PredictiveandMeasuredFieldValuesofLeader SdelfAwarness Period Leader Self Awarness Measurded Values
  8. 8. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 Solo and Johnson 008 Figure 2: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Figure 3: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period 0.00E+00 5.00E-02 1.00E-01 1.50E-01 2.00E-01 2.50E-01 3.00E-01 3.50E-01 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 PredictiveandMeasuredFieldValuesofLeaderSelf Awarness Period Leader Self Awarness Measurded Values 0.00E+00 5.00E-02 1.00E-01 1.50E-01 2.00E-01 2.50E-01 3.00E-01 3.50E-01 4.00E-01 4.50E-01 5.00E-01 0 10 20 30 40 50 PredictiveandMeasuredValuesofLeaderSelf Awarness Period Leader Self Awarness Measurded Values
  9. 9. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 009 Triple A Res. J. Multidisci. Figure 4: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period Figure 5: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period 0.00E+00 5.00E-02 1.00E-01 1.50E-01 2.00E-01 2.50E-01 3.00E-01 3.50E-01 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 PredictiveandMeasuredValuesofLeaderSelf Awarness Period Leader Self Awarness Measurded Values 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0 20 40 60 80 100 PredictiveValuesofLeaderSelfAwarness Period Leader Self Awarness Measurded Values
  10. 10. Triple A Research Journal of Multidisciplinary (JMD) | Vol.2 Issue1 | August 2018 Solo and Johnson 010 Figure 6: Predictive and Measured Values of Leader Self Awareness at Different Period CONCLUSION The study has monitor the growth rate of leader self awareness in manufacturing companies, exponential rise were experienced, these are base on the effectiveness conflict management in such co-operate organization, other were increase collaborations and improved communication, these parameters detailed the rate of growth in such manufacturing companies, variation of derived values were evaluated in terms of relationships on leader self awareness, these was to establish the efficiency on the output experienced from the study, the leader self awareness will always developed the proportion of various qualities expressed as dimension, this developed concepts on express effectiveness on conflict management in telecommunications, the derived model monitor leader self awareness base on these factors, these include increase collaboration and improved communication, the derive solution developed predictive model that were subjected to model validation with measured field data, and both parameters developed favorable fits. REFERENCES Ciarrochi JV, Caputi P (2002). A critical evaluation of the emotional intelligence construct. Personality and Individual Differences, 28(3): 539-561 Dillenbourge P, Baker M, Blaye A, O’Malley C (1996). The evolution of research on collaborative learning. In Spada, E, Reiman, P. (Eds). Learning in humans and Machine: Towards and Interdisciplinary learning science. 2(4:) 189-211. Dirette D (2010). Enhancement through Learning and Function: a theoretically based guideline for practice. British Journal of Occupational Therapy. 74(7): 309- 318. Goleman D (1998). Leader self-Reported Emotional Intelligence and Perceived Employee Creativity: An Exploratory Study. Creativity and Innovation Management. 16(3): 250-264. Johnson et al (2017). Hope and Operational Sustainability of Oil Companies in Port Harcourt. West Afr. J. Bus. 12(1): 133-146. Jehn KA, Salovey P (2001). The dynamics nature of conflict: A longitudinal study of intra-group conflict and group performance. Academy of Manag. J. 44(2): 238- 597. McGarvey R (1997). Final score: get more from employees by upping your EQ. Entrepreneur. 25(7): 78-81. Wang S, Yi X (2011). It’s happiness that counts: Full mediating effect of job satisfaction on the linkage from leader-Member Exchange relationship to turnover intuition in Chinese companies. Int. J. Leadership Stud. 6(3): 337-356. West R, Turner L (2007). Introducing communication theory. Mcgraw Hill. 186–1987. Yaghoubi M, Yarmohammadian MH, Raeisi AR, Javadi M, Saghaiannejad S, Isfahani S (2010). The relationship between the organizational justice and organizational citizenship behaviour among medical records staffs of selected hospitals of Isfahan. Health Information Management, Special Issue, Pp. 506-515. Zhong JA, Lam W, Chen Z (2011). Relationship between leader–member exchange and organizational citizenship behaviors: “Examining the moderating role of empowerment”. Asia Pacific J. Manag. 28(3): 609- 626. 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 0 20 40 60 80 100 PredictiveandMaeasuredValuesof LeaderSelfAwarness Period Leader Self Awarness Measurded Values

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