Cathy Duff - State of CSI 2014

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Trialogue director, Cathy Duff presenting the latest findings conducted by Trialogue on the state of csi in 2013/2014.

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Cathy Duff - State of CSI 2014

  1. 1. CSI  in  South  Africa   CSI  Ma1ers  conference     June  2014   Presented  by:  CATHY  DUFF   The  state  of  CSI  
  2. 2. CSI  expenditure  conDnues  to  grow   and  amounted  to  R7.8  billion  in  2013   2   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   Base  year:  2001   0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   2001   2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013   CSI  expenditure  (R  billion)   Nominal   (7.8  bn)   Real     (adjusted   for  inflaDon)  
  3. 3. CSI  expenditure  is  significantly  lower  if   measured  in  narrow  terms   Total  CSI   R7.8bn   Dedicated   CSI  R6.4bn   Distributed   via  NPOs   R3.5bn   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103   3  
  4. 4. More  than  half  of  companies  increased   their  CSI  expenditure  in  2013   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103   Stayed  the  same  (20%)   Decreased  (24%)   Increased  (55%)   Don't  know  (1%)   %  corporate  respondents   4  
  5. 5. CSI  expenditure  is  highly  concentrated   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  100   13   51%   15   19%   27   18%  45   12%   Number  of  top-­‐100  companies   %  expenditure  (R5.4  billion)   100     Less  than  R25m     R25  -­‐  R50m     R50  -­‐  R100m     More  than   R100m   0   5  
  6. 6. Moral  imperaOve  is  a  key  driver  of  CSI   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103  (up  to  3  responses  each)   0   10   20   30   40   50   60   70   80   90   Stakeholder   Licence-­‐to-­‐operate   Industry  sector   Strategic  reasons   BBBEE  Codes   ReputaDon   Moral  imperaDve   %  corporate  respondents   6  
  7. 7. CSI  expenditure  is  concentrated  in   three  provinces   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103,  corporate  support   N  =  96,  CSI  expenditure   70     60     50     40     30     20     10     0     10     20     30     40     Northern  Cape   Mpumalanga   North  West   Limpopo   Free  State   Eastern  Cape   KwaZulu-­‐Natal   Western  Cape   Gauteng   NaDonal   %  corporate  support   %  CSI  expenditure   7  
  8. 8. Urban  projects  receive  more   corporate  funding  than  rural  projects   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103     100     80     60     40     20     0     20     40     60     80     Don't  know   Rural   Urban   %  corporate  support   %  CSI  expenditure   8  
  9. 9. EducaOon  receives  the  most  support   and  largest  share  of  CSI  spend   100     80     60     40     20     0     20     40     60     Other   Non-­‐sector  specific  donaDons  &  grants   Housing  &  living  condiDons   Safety  &  security   Sports  development   Arts  &  culture   Environment   Enterprise  development   Food  security  &  agriculture   Health   Social  &  community  development   EducaDon   %  corporate  support   %  CSI  expenditure   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103   9  
  10. 10. The  vast  majority  of  corporates  support   flagship  projects  for  three  or  more  years   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103   0   10   20   30   40   50   Don't  know   Less  than  one  year  or   once-­‐off   One  year   2-­‐3  years   3-­‐5  years   More  than  5  years   %  corporate  respondents   10  
  11. 11. NPOs  receive  just  over  half  of  CSI   funding   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  103,  corporate  support   N  =  99,  CSI  expenditure   100     80     60     40     20     0     20     40     60     80     Other   To  government  departments   To  other  for-­‐profit  organisaDons   To  industry  iniDaDves   To  government  insDtuDons   To  non-­‐profit  organisaDons   %  corporate  support   %  CSI  expenditure   11  
  12. 12. Their  greatest  share  of  income  comes   from  corporates   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   N  =  170   0%   5%   10%   15%   20%   25%   SA  corporates   SA  government   Private  individuals   Foreign  private  donors/organisaDons   Self-­‐generated   SA  trusts/foundaDons   NaDonal  lo1ery   Foreign  government   Intermediary  NGOs   Other   %  NPO  funding  Unweighted   Weighted  by  size  of  income   12  
  13. 13. Almost  half  of  NPOs  experienced  an   increase  in  income  in  2012/13   Source:  CSI  Handbook  16th  Edi2on   2013:  N  =  186   2012:  N  =  149   33%   46%   30%   28%   38%   26%   0%   10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%   70%   80%   90%   100%   2012   2013   %  NPO  respondents   Stayed  the   same   Decreased   Increased   13  
  14. 14. The  administraOve  burden  on  NPOs   increases  with  the  number  of  funders   Average  number  of  donor  relaOonships   2012*   2013   Private  individuals   1  074   439   SA  corporates   19   22   SA  trusts/foundaDons   6   4   SA  Government   3   2   Foreign  private  donors/organisaDons   8   3   Intermediary  NPOs   4   1   NaDonal  Lo1ery   n/a   1   Foreign  governments   3   1   Other   4   8   *  Including  outliers   14  
  15. 15. CSI  in  South  Africa   CSI  Ma1ers  conference     June  2014   Presented  by:  CATHY  DUFF   Strategic  CSI  
  16. 16. Strategic  CSI  implies  a  convergence  of   interests  between  business  and  society   Social  Benefit   Pure  business   Pure  philanthropy   Combined  social  and   economic  benefit   Economic  Benefit   Porter  &  Kramer  2002  –  The  compe22ve  advantage  of  corporate  philanthropy   16  
  17. 17. Trialogue  has  developed  a  CSI  posiOoning   matrix  that  locates  projects  on  both  dimensions  Social  benefit   Corporate  benefit   Charitable   grantmaking   Developmental   CSI   Strategic   CSI   Commercial   grantmaking   No  visible   benefit   RecogniOon  of   contribuOon   Stakeholder   benefit   CompeOOve   benefit   Beneficial   impact   Beneficial   outcomes   Visible   outputs   No  visible   benefit   17  
  18. 18. Improving  CSI  pracOce   Plan  interven2ons  six  months  in  advance   Obtain  community  and  senior  execu2ve  buy-­‐in   Focus,  focus,  focus.  Concentrate  on  two  development  areas   and  long-­‐term  investment  in  these  areas   Don’t  do  once-­‐off  projects   Meet  community  perceived  needs   Perform  M&E   Learn  from  others  already  in  the  sector     Collaborate  –  community  development  is  not  a  compe22ve   opportunity   Be  passionate  about  the  job   18  
  19. 19. Thank  you  

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