+
Water Reckoning
Research Roundtable
Heathcote Reconsidered Conference, July
7, 2013, Greenwich University, London
Presen...
+
Rolling Roll – what is it?
 The concept of Rolling Role is to involve different groups or classes in
building a communi...
+
Site – type of
school
Grade/Age Number of
students/gend
er
Drama
experience
Other relevant
details
Queensland –
Public
s...
+
The dramatic pre-text
# Discovery of a lost culture of frozen people
underwater who experienced times of crisis
# Respon...
+
Ideas from Heathcote‟s
work
 Drama is about making
significant meaning through
commitment to an enterprise
and fiction
...
+
How it has worked?
# Groups create drama work
using different conventions. Key
content and outcomes and
digitally record...
+
Research questions
How can Heathcote‟s Rolling Role strategy, drama
and digital platforms be used for contemporary
educ...
+
Research methods
Pre and post-test surveys
Small group focus group questions (beginning
and end)
Analysis of student ...
+
Survey 1
N = 83
 Qld = 25
 NSW = 19
 Greece = 11
 Singapore = 15
 USA = 16
General demographics
• Technology use
– Nearly all
participants have
a mobile device
and multiple
digital devices
• Main uses
communications
an...
+
Technology devices
0 devices
1 device
2 devices
3 devices
4 devices
6 devices
95% of devices
include a
mobile phone
+ Technology use
 95% of students spend more than 10 hours per week online
or using their mobile devices
 100% of studen...
Sustainability
awareness and
intent
Polyxeni Simou
MSt in Drama in Education
Water Drama
 learning the
importance of water in
our life
 the water problems
 the relationship of
man with water
 the...
 the strange and innovative ideas
 the video watching and making
 the team work and cooperation
 the rolling role tech...
 Half of the students have reported that drama
has helped them change their attitude towards
their responsibility about w...
 All of them found
the use of technology in this project very
important
 They loved the idea of videos,
but
because of t...
would like to participate
in the same or a similar project
again
Water Reckoning:
The Singapore Story
Mei Yee Chang
Prue Wales
The Singapore Situation
In addition the 3 classes
were undertaking a
module in Qualitative
Research
As the drama was going...
Aims & Objectives
Like the other sites we sought
• Digital learning through applied drama as a
means to explore contempora...
Our Key Objectives
• To facilitate students’
learning about process
drama
And
• To identify what they
were learning about
...
What did students learn about
• Planning
• Framing
• Facilitation/Artistry of
Teacher
• Development of ideas ?
The Pre-text
Initially, while students found
the pre-text engaging they
didn’t buy into fiction
- Many said the video was
...
The Fiction
Students subsequently bought
into the fiction through a
video clip of Dwarka
(lost, sunken Indian
city), and b...
Thinking about Process Drama
Throughout the drama, students were evaluating how
their teacher was engaging them. At the en...
Reflections
• Students told us, during
drama, they wondered…
• Will I be able to do what
she [the teacher] is doing?
• Wil...
National & Social Identity
One of our aims has been to
explore students’ shifting
subjectivities in relation to
the dramat...
Cultural identity
• Multicultural groups were created
within the city. This was seen
through…
• Creation of religious temp...
To Conclude
• Students feel they have learnt much about
process drama from the experience
• They recognise the possibiliti...
Program - 10 lessons
• Students-in-role as
scientists, TiR as the curator of
an international science
convention, students...
(e)ngagement framework
Place
Knowledge
Ability
Control
Voice
(Munns et al 2013)
Theme: student
engagement
Discourses of power: placeEngaging message: It's great to be a kid from / home is ...
Sydney sit...
I did ... another picture
of, like, a big graffiti wall that
me and a few of my other
friends and cousins and stuff
did wh...
I took a photo of the Bondi
icebergs and the Tamarama beach
where I live. It‟s very beautiful and
some of my favourite pla...
Theme: student
engagement
Discourses of power: knowledge
Engaging message: We can see the connection and
the meaning
Sydne...
Theme: student
engagement
Discourses of power: ability
Engaging message: I am capable
Sydney site: Students compared their...
Theme: student
engagement
Discourses of power:
controlEngaging message: We do this
Sydney site: The in-role Town Hall Meet...
Data excerpts - control:
About TiR: S2.1: It sort of gives you the standard…he‟s like the teacher and he just
jumps into t...
Theme: student
engagement
Discourses of power: voiceEngaging message: We share
Sydney site: Teacher-in-role with Students-...
Christine Hatton, University of Newcastle, Sydney
Mary Mooney, University of Western Sydney
Jennifer Nicholls, Macquarie U...
+
Queensland site
Some initial reflections on
Sustainability and technology
aspects
(Susan Davis, Angelina
Ambrosetti, Gle...
+ What do you think are the
current water issues that the
world is facing?
Natural disasters
Flood
Drought
Tsunami
Wate...
+
Technology will …..
create more issues within our
environment,
but it could also help to solve some
issues within our ...
+Key experiences in shifting
understandings – realising these are
real „human‟ issues – the sensory
and the „now‟
Importan...
+ Changed perceptions – from the
head to the heart……
At the beginning of the project, students
reported that….„sustainabil...
+
Changed perceptions – from the
head to the heart……
Students indicated that they felt
sympathy towards those who were
fac...
+
Changed perceptions – from the
head to the heart……but…
Many of the project‟s
young people distrust
authority, particular...
+
Digitally creative generation?
 Considering that the majority of students owned a mobile
phone, most did not engage in ...
Narrative anticipation
Teacher as mediator and curator of aesthetic encounters
Utilising Mediation tools of imagination & ...
+
Common elements &
interesting points
+
 There were difficulties with students embracing the pre-text and focus as
both a fictional context that was also deali...
Rolling Role Roundtable - Research and Reflections from The Water Reckoning Project
Rolling Role Roundtable - Research and Reflections from The Water Reckoning Project
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Rolling Role Roundtable - Research and Reflections from The Water Reckoning Project

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The Water Reckoning project was initiated to involve young people, teachers and academics in a creative project which drew on Dorothy Heathcote’s philosophy and strategies. Together the groups have co-constructed a story that responds to a common pre-text. Educational and research sites have been involved from Australia, Greece, Singapore, the USA and the UK. This project has focused on exploring ideas that relate to the UN Year of Water Cooperation in keeping with Heathcote’s concern for using drama to raise awareness about human understanding and experience. For her drama had to be about things ‘that mattered’. Our drama has explored how humans cooperate to share and manage water and deal with situations such as drought or extreme weather events. Research has explored the nature of learnings and understandings that have emerged for participants from the process, including cross-cultural awareness and attitudes towards sustainability issues.

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  • Rolling Role Roundtable - Research and Reflections from The Water Reckoning Project

    1. 1. + Water Reckoning Research Roundtable Heathcote Reconsidered Conference, July 7, 2013, Greenwich University, London Present at session: Sue Davis, Xenia Simou, Christine Hatton, Mary Mooney, Julian Kennard With contributions also from: Prue Wales, Mei Yee Chang, Angelina Ambrosetti, Glenn Taylor, Jenny Nicholls & Jeffrey Tan
    2. 2. + Rolling Roll – what is it?  The concept of Rolling Role is to involve different groups or classes in building a community that then faces some kind of change. The initiators create a common context and agree to the key features, affairs and concerns of the community. The students/children are then involved in building the community, the lives, events and artefacts of it and add to developments.  Work is often left incomplete so another group can take it forward and continue the drama.  Work produced by classes if publicly open and available to stimulate other work.  Heathcote suggested this work lends it self to sharing through something like a website. See ‘Contexts for active learning: four models’ By Dorothy Heathcote
    3. 3. + Site – type of school Grade/Age Number of students/gend er Drama experience Other relevant details Queensland – Public secondary school – 1000 students Year 10 – 14-5 years 25 students 22 girls, 3 boys 1-3 years Little drama outside school. Limited process drama Sydney – Independent school 1200 Year 9, 2 x year 10 21 students, - 11 girls, 9 boys Elective drama Quite a lot of out of school experience – NIDA etc Greece – Public school near sea, approx. 230 students 15-18 15 years old 12 students – 11 girls, 1 boy No school drama Different type of drama work for students, hard to get together for co- curricular work. Singapore - polytechnic 16 year olds 3 x classes Studying applied theatre Approx 3 x 2 hr sessions USA- small private secondary 14-15 & 16- 17 years 16 students 11 girls, 5 boys Studying applied theatre Applied theatre students leading workshops for year 6
    4. 4. + The dramatic pre-text # Discovery of a lost culture of frozen people underwater who experienced times of crisis # Responding to a message in a bottle about the history of „Ardus Unda‟ # Who were these people and what happened? # What did their emissaries learn about stories from elsewhere around the world? # Is it possible to help the frozen people or restore them to life? (VIDEOS REMOVED FROM THIS POWERPOINT – SEE www.water- reckoning.net for videos and project details ) Jason deCaires Taylor imagery
    5. 5. + Ideas from Heathcote‟s work  Drama is about making significant meaning through commitment to an enterprise and fiction  Students will see the real world more clearly when they have experienced the dramatic one  Drama as rehearsal for life  Finding the universal in the particular making, the emotional connection  Participants should have the power to take action and operate, drawing on what they know and can do
    6. 6. + How it has worked? # Groups create drama work using different conventions. Key content and outcomes and digitally recorded and documented - audio, text, images, videos # Selected material is posted to PlaceStories, videos on YouTube # Each group reviews what has already been posted and considering ways to „roll‟ the action forward # There are some session where participants interact online together
    7. 7. + Research questions How can Heathcote‟s Rolling Role strategy, drama and digital platforms be used for contemporary education? What impact do these models have on student learning? What impact does cultural context and place have on the work and learning that emerges? How can rolling role be used for sustainability and active citizenship education?
    8. 8. + Research methods Pre and post-test surveys Small group focus group questions (beginning and end) Analysis of student work, artefacts and creative outputs Field notes and observations (NB Project has just finished and data analysis is ongoing but some initial data and preliminary findings follows)
    9. 9. + Survey 1 N = 83  Qld = 25  NSW = 19  Greece = 11  Singapore = 15  USA = 16 General demographics
    10. 10. • Technology use – Nearly all participants have a mobile device and multiple digital devices • Main uses communications and consumption (of music) • Low level of digital creative content generation • Not a vrey high level of gamers • More content generated reported by Greek students
    11. 11. + Technology devices 0 devices 1 device 2 devices 3 devices 4 devices 6 devices 95% of devices include a mobile phone
    12. 12. + Technology use  95% of students spend more than 10 hours per week online or using their mobile devices  100% of students use their devices to communicate with friends (Facebook, messaging)  Youtube, Instagram, Tumblr, downloading music were also popular uses 95% of devices include a mobile phone 90% of devices include a computer 75% of devices include an IPod
    13. 13. Sustainability awareness and intent
    14. 14. Polyxeni Simou MSt in Drama in Education
    15. 15. Water Drama  learning the importance of water in our life  the water problems  the relationship of man with water  the consequences of our actions  imagination  creativity  cooperation  communication  meeting other people‟s cultures  building on other people‟s contribution
    16. 16.  the strange and innovative ideas  the video watching and making  the team work and cooperation  the rolling role technique the new way of using technology  the freedom and ownership in creativity
    17. 17.  Half of the students have reported that drama has helped them change their attitude towards their responsibility about water issues.  One student wrote: “I couldn‟t believe that such a precious „possession‟ could be connected with such a tremendous catastrophe”  Another reported:  “I haven‟t changed my attitude, but sometimes I wonder: could we be in the Ardus Unda people‟s place, because of the environmental problems of our civilization?”
    18. 18.  All of them found the use of technology in this project very important  They loved the idea of videos, but because of their inexperience, sometimes, they were confused and they couldn‟t distinguish what was real and what was not.
    19. 19. would like to participate in the same or a similar project again
    20. 20. Water Reckoning: The Singapore Story Mei Yee Chang Prue Wales
    21. 21. The Singapore Situation In addition the 3 classes were undertaking a module in Qualitative Research As the drama was going on in one class another class was observing, notating and studying their peers
    22. 22. Aims & Objectives Like the other sites we sought • Digital learning through applied drama as a means to explore contemporary issues around sustainability • We were also interested in examining ways the students expressed their personal and national identities
    23. 23. Our Key Objectives • To facilitate students’ learning about process drama And • To identify what they were learning about process drama as an art form
    24. 24. What did students learn about • Planning • Framing • Facilitation/Artistry of Teacher • Development of ideas ?
    25. 25. The Pre-text Initially, while students found the pre-text engaging they didn’t buy into fiction - Many said the video was too “professional”, music was not needed - Archaeologists would not make such “polished” films Hegemonic belief/practice of ‘Singaporean pragmatism’, we wonder?
    26. 26. The Fiction Students subsequently bought into the fiction through a video clip of Dwarka (lost, sunken Indian city), and by re-creating aspects of the city They found the ‘Rolling’ from other locations engaging and helpful in building narrative Constant struggle with ‘suspension of disbelief’, that seems partly due the mixture of fact and fiction, real and unreal
    27. 27. Thinking about Process Drama Throughout the drama, students were evaluating how their teacher was engaging them. At the end of each sessions questions included… • How can I make this (the pre-text) more relevant for the Singapore context? • How can I make the drama (more) engaging? • What are the skills I need to facilitate something like this? • Could I make this work with a group of secondary school students?
    28. 28. Reflections • Students told us, during drama, they wondered… • Will I be able to do what she [the teacher] is doing? • Will I be able to frame a drama and develop it like that? • Eg: Co-creation of city prior to disaster. They found activity engaging and felt it something they could do • They talked about ways that they could refine activity
    29. 29. National & Social Identity One of our aims has been to explore students’ shifting subjectivities in relation to the dramatic subject matter & how they resonate in & with the real world & To identify how the expressions of “being Singaporean” emerged through the drama
    30. 30. Cultural identity • Multicultural groups were created within the city. This was seen through… • Creation of religious temples in doomed city. Students conducted religious rituals conveying multiple belief systems rather than a hegemonic religion • In creation of entertainment sites, students constructed markets that sold food from all over the world • This supported in online survey – majority of students claimed they feel accepting of different cultures
    31. 31. To Conclude • Students feel they have learnt much about process drama from the experience • They recognise the possibilities of using digital technologies for projects such as this • They see strong possibilities for using ‘rolling role’ as a way of building drama • They really enjoyed the experience of talking with young people from overseas
    32. 32. Program - 10 lessons • Students-in-role as scientists, TiR as the curator of an international science convention, students examined artefacts and gave an in role press conference • Creating the people of Ardus Unda and their stories using the artefacts, mapping time before the disaster (the warnings) • The circle as a selection ritual and symbol of strength • Selecting the emissaries – who is best to go? Potential candidates are put forward at a town meeting (taking Seattle‟s idea) and a collective decision is reached • Saying goodbye, giving the emissaries a keepsake for the journey and endowing the object with story – „remember who we are, you need to teach them about our ways‟ • The emissaries journey –what did they find? What was different? Did they find help? • A ritual ending – our message to the future • Playbuilding as synthesis
    33. 33. (e)ngagement framework Place Knowledge Ability Control Voice (Munns et al 2013)
    34. 34. Theme: student engagement Discourses of power: placeEngaging message: It's great to be a kid from / home is ... Sydney site: Students used mobile phones to document their sense of place; they played with notions of place and connection within the drama (eg home, land, future places and change) Data excerpts: I chose one that was a photo on the way to school by car, and I wanted to incorporate what we did in the Water Reckoning Project, when it was like what the world would be like in the future if we were transported. It was really foggy in the morning so I wanted to have kind of sad looking city rather than a positive one. Well the photos I put in were of Parramatta Road, on my way to school. So that‟s my average day. One was the view from the back of the school, so its, you know, centred around school. And then one was of the beach, its kind of what I do with my recreation time.
    35. 35. I did ... another picture of, like, a big graffiti wall that me and a few of my other friends and cousins and stuff did which is like…who I am.
    36. 36. I took a photo of the Bondi icebergs and the Tamarama beach where I live. It‟s very beautiful and some of my favourite places in the world. I put in two photos. One of the sunset, because where I live on the Bay Run. Because one day there was a really really red sun, so I took a photograph of that. And one of the beach, like my pastime and the Bay Run is where I live. There‟s often sunsets like that, like really nice sunsets against the bay. I took some ones of the harbour bridge and of the city. I thought that was really. You know.. about Sydney.
    37. 37. Theme: student engagement Discourses of power: knowledge Engaging message: We can see the connection and the meaning Sydney site: Group playbuilding synthesising significant moments of their role-based drama and the motifs online in the dramatic fiction – rolling role; goodbye circle Data excerpt: S2.3: When we did that circle thing…that was quite personal. At least that‟s when I started to connect with them. I: Which circle one was that? S2.3: The one where we had to, like the item we had to say goodbye… S2.1: That…its almost like in real life as well…you don‟t realise how real something is until you lose it. Like its almost like we were experiencing it…like you kind of thought about how someone is going to go away and you will never see them again. And it makes you think, if this was real, those people would have gone through so much. Yeah I agree…that was the bit that I felt….
    38. 38. Theme: student engagement Discourses of power: ability Engaging message: I am capable Sydney site: Students compared their drama work with other sites Data excerpt: 4.2 I really liked when… I really like seeing other people put on different characters that they had thought of. (Interviewer: In our group?) yes in the whole class and all around the world… like people become the ancestors 2.1 Everyone is more or less at the same level as us. There‟s no one that‟s really really really good or a group that doesn‟t really know what they are doing. Like I am not saying everyone‟s bad or anything, but we are all the same level, which is quite good.
    39. 39. Theme: student engagement Discourses of power: controlEngaging message: We do this Sydney site: The in-role Town Hall Meeting; Students-in-role as scientists across various fields and teacher-in-role as a curator of an international science convention; Students-in-role as people of Ardus Unda and emissaries; Costume apparel support students commitment to role
    40. 40. Data excerpts - control: About TiR: S2.1: It sort of gives you the standard…he‟s like the teacher and he just jumps into this role that he‟s obviously never played before and he‟s really setting the standard for everyone. Like everyone else is like, „alright so, this is how into it…how a teacher is…so, its not going to be embarrassing if we are the same as him, because we can just, like go and be in character...‟ and no one is going to care. About SiR: 4.5 I really liked when we were choosing who would survive and who would die cause it was just interesting and how we did that exercise where we were promoting our cases as to why we should get chosen and it was just kind of interesting to put people up in front of others but for a good cause because of their skills and we did feel a bit bad for the characters that didn‟t make it and didn‟t have hopes for the future. 4.3 When we play their role it kind of makes you understand it more being these people pretending to be them makes you understand it more… what it would be like. 4.5 I think I empathised in a way that it did seem like a very real scenario…. Like you couldn‟t imagine the community…(Interviewer interjects something about the Tuvalu community not wanting to leave) … cause all of us definitely wanted to leave and we were all very frightened and a lot of people… if it was me..if that happened to us I would want to leave. I wouldn‟t want to stay. You would just see it getting worse.
    41. 41. Theme: student engagement Discourses of power: voiceEngaging message: We share Sydney site: Teacher-in-role with Students-in-role – making decisions around dramatic action, character relationships and playbuilt performances; Researchers filmed students work and uploaded to PlaceStories – validation of their ideas Data excerpt: 4.4 I liked watching the videos of other schools and us to see, like, if they were doing the same thing, comparing them. S2.4: I liked the meeting the best, when everyone was sitting around and talking, there was a high level of energy and everyone had a very fixed view on something but you had an opportunity to change their mind on something. There was a lot of, kind of, there was some anger that was either acting or real, I‟m not quite sure, if they wanted to be chosen or not, they tried to force people to like them, and that was really interesting and cool to be able to do.
    42. 42. Christine Hatton, University of Newcastle, Sydney Mary Mooney, University of Western Sydney Jennifer Nicholls, Macquarie University Sydney Julian Kennard, participating teacher
    43. 43. + Queensland site Some initial reflections on Sustainability and technology aspects (Susan Davis, Angelina Ambrosetti, Glenn Taylor)
    44. 44. + What do you think are the current water issues that the world is facing? Natural disasters Flood Drought Tsunami Water contamination 1st world vs. 3rd world Water wastage Restrictions Pollution Global Warming  Rising sea levels Destruction of life Overfishing Loss of marine life Loss of mammals People care more about themselves than the environment.
    45. 45. + Technology will ….. create more issues within our environment, but it could also help to solve some issues within our environment in that we would develop specific technology to address those issues.
    46. 46. +Key experiences in shifting understandings – realising these are real „human‟ issues – the sensory and the „now‟ Importance of the „Tuvalu‟ video for highlighting the urgency of these issues http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlFVJBZfsBY
    47. 47. + Changed perceptions – from the head to the heart…… At the beginning of the project, students reported that….„sustainability plays such a big part in our lives‟, They knew and could recite the rhetoric about sustainability – don‟t waste water, don‟t pollute, recycle etc. The drama activities provided the opportunity to „feel‟ the impacts and become emotionally involved The realization that water issues surround us and that we need to work together to create solutions
    48. 48. + Changed perceptions – from the head to the heart…… Students indicated that they felt sympathy towards those who were facing sustainability issues “Realizing the affects and issues to do with water and how it affects large groups of people.” “Watching the video about Tuvalu – seeing that it is really sinking. It is real.” “The world is changing and water is becoming more valuable.” Will this lead to active citizenship? Of what kind?
    49. 49. + Changed perceptions – from the head to the heart……but… Many of the project‟s young people distrust authority, particularly the government and those seen with „power‟ The direction in which the drama progressed brought out these distrust issues and the students emphasized these in role. The rolling role provided the students with the opportunity to communicate what they distrust about people in power. People in power: • Make choices to suit themselves • Are only in power to get rich • Don‟t think about the greater good
    50. 50. + Digitally creative generation?  Considering that the majority of students owned a mobile phone, most did not engage in the project in a digitally creative way.  Students were keen to use their phones for personal social media purposes (outside the drama), the phones were actually a distraction for the resistant students and disengaged them from the context and content  Real value of digital media – experience framed and meaning shaped by technology  Digital creative modes were mediated by the teacher and researcher – students enjoyed watching the outputs and were happy to star in the digital modes, but did not want to create any themselves.  The use of online platforms for enabling collaborative learning experiences across sites viewed very positively – enabling international collaboration – real potential for „global citizenship‟
    51. 51. Narrative anticipation Teacher as mediator and curator of aesthetic encounters Utilising Mediation tools of imagination & experience Negotiating & becoming the other Creating identities linked to own experience – exploring identity within safety of dramatic context Engagement of the senses (feeling and feelings) Sensory engagement increasing the sense of presence in the real world and the fiction (touch, taste, feel) Use of recording technology creates a context where an elevated sense of presence and audience Framing experience with technology Interpreter of meaning Community formation and commitment
    52. 52. + Common elements & interesting points
    53. 53. +  There were difficulties with students embracing the pre-text and focus as both a fictional context that was also dealing with real-life issues.  Great opportunity for teachers/researchers to share planning & experience (de-privatise the classroom)  Explicit teaching of drama conventions and artform & sustainability issues essential in current educational climates  Importance of utilising aesthetically charged 'tools‟  Increased awareness by students of local and global water issues – For many the data shows that understanding moved from 'the head to the heart' from cognitive knowing to feeling and knowing.  Those who experienced hangouts all commented on how although the technology issues in schools are still significant, that these experiences were very engaging for students and worth pursuing – enabling real global awareness and citizenship  Great potential for exploring human aspects of sustainability at local and global levels

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